137 episodes

Wesley Morris and Jenna Wortham are working it out in this weekly show about culture in the broadest sense. That means television, film, books, music — but also the culture of work, dating, the internet and how those all fit together.

Still Processing The New York Times

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7 • 8.5K Ratings

Wesley Morris and Jenna Wortham are working it out in this weekly show about culture in the broadest sense. That means television, film, books, music — but also the culture of work, dating, the internet and how those all fit together.

    'Before I Let Go'

    'Before I Let Go'

    When the three opening notes of the song hit, there’s only one thing to do: Find your people and dance. Today, we’re talking about “Before I Let Go,” by Maze featuring Frankie Beverly, and the song’s unique ability to gather and galvanize. It wasn’t a huge hit when it came out in 1981, but it has become a unifying Black anthem and an unfailing source of joy. We dissect Beyoncé’s cover, and we hear from friends, listeners and the Philadelphia DJ Patty Jackson about their memories of the classic song.

    • 43 min
    The People in the Neighborhood

    The People in the Neighborhood

    A powerful — and revealing — aspect of the Derek Chauvin trial was the community it created out of strangers. Week later, we’re still thinking about the witnesses, and the way they were connected in telling the story of how George Floyd lost his life. This phenomenon is reflected in works of art, like Spike Lee’s “Do the Right Thing,” which explores the conflict inherent in a community.

    • 39 min
    We, Tina

    We, Tina

    She’s simply the best. A new documentary on HBO (called, simply, “Tina”) explores Tina Turner’s tremendous triumphs, but we wanted to go deeper. We talk about how her entire career was an act of repossession: Taking back her name, her voice, her image, her vitality and her spirituality made her one of the biggest rock stars in the world, even in her 50s.

    Also, Jenna and Wesley want your help in settling a bet! Do you know the song “Before I Let Go” by Frankie Beverly and Maze? Did you play it at a party or dance to it at a wedding? Do you jump to your feet every time it comes on? Grab your phone and record yourself telling a story about what the song has meant to you. Send it to us at stillprocessing@nytimes.com.

    • 42 min
    Cathy Park Hong

    Cathy Park Hong

    The Asian-American poet wants to help women and people of color find healing — and clarity — in their rage. Hong's book of essays, “Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning," came out in February 2020, and it’s taken on new urgency with the rise in anti-Asian violence and discrimination during the pandemic.

    • 37 min
    Lil Nas X? Not Sorry!

    Lil Nas X? Not Sorry!

    Social media apologies have become the standard celebrity response to internet outrage. But why do they feel so deeply inadequate? Jenna and Wesley dissect a new spate of public apologies from the last year. And they look to the activist and writer adrienne maree brown for an example of a “fully evolved” apology.

    • 42 min
    40 Acres and a Movie

    40 Acres and a Movie

    Disney owns a piece of every living person’s childhood. Now it owns Marvel Studios, too. Jenna and Wesley look at depictions of racist tropes and stereotypes in Disney’s ever-expanding catalog. The company has made recent attempts to atone for its past. But can it move forward without repeating the same mistakes?

    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
8.5K Ratings

8.5K Ratings

Drakefanpage ,

LAC review

I like this. Very cool and entertaining. Grabs the , I guess listeners attention !

LucySMK ,

Insipid, Underwhelming

The two hosts’ idea of being critical is formulaic to the point of being boring, embarrassing. I would usually begin an episode with eagerness and curiosity about the topics they’ve curated only to find myself frustrated at the disappointing and predictable turn the conversation unfailingly takes. They obviously love hearing themselves talk; you can hear it in the way they react to and drag out certain points like it’s the single greatest revelation to happen to them all year, or even the past decade. My problem with this is that this mode of delivery is used to mask the fact that they provide no original insight. (Or maybe they do, but to themselves only? Like their opinions are news to them but in reality something the world has already “processed,” likely ages ago?) It tries to be organically smart, thoughtful, and intellectual but in an too-conscious, overproduced way. The result is this cringe-fest of a podcast that I’ve finally decided to delete; I don’t need regular deliveries of flat and trite—but with a dash of self-importance—taking up storage space.

Erremex ,

CABALLO DORADO

That’s the song that triggers Mexican line dancing!

Love you guys.

-rebecca

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