176 episodes

Click here to Subscribe in iTunes.

Helping you become a better writer.

Join Shawn Coyne, author of Story Grid and a top editor for 25+ years, and Tim Grahl, struggling writer, as they discuss the ins and outs of what makes a story great.

More at www.StoryGrid.com.

Story Grid Podcast Shawn Coyne and Tim Grahl

    • Arts
    • 4.9, 525 Ratings

Click here to Subscribe in iTunes.

Helping you become a better writer.

Join Shawn Coyne, author of Story Grid and a top editor for 25+ years, and Tim Grahl, struggling writer, as they discuss the ins and outs of what makes a story great.

More at www.StoryGrid.com.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
525 Ratings

525 Ratings

LJKOIS ,

Solid gold information!

I found this podcast after enrolling in a writers group online. I’ve never written a story before and all of the information that Tim and Shawn break down is so helpful! I have since purchased the Story Grid book and know that my writing will be so much better for having learned it! Thank you for making it all available!

AGPS Guru ,

Great podcast!

I stumbled on this podcast about a month ago, went back and downloaded all of them to listen to from the beginning. The first "season" (are podcasts measured that way?) has Tim Grahl working with Shawn Coyne to improve his writing.

Since Tim was roughly at the same place in his development as a fiction writer that I am, I have found these episodes to be great. Tim asks all the questions I would ask if I had the chance to talk to Shawn Coyne or someone like him.

If you're a writer, especially one who's developing your craft and struggling to understand what makes a given story "work" or not, and how to fix it if it doesn't, this podcast is, in my estimation, a must, and I also recommend reading Shawn's book.

I have found the Foolscap method indispensible in developing initial story ideas. The grid itself plays a much larger role when I go back to edit my first draft, but tracking the basic elements in the grid (what happens in a given scene) has helped me keep everything straight in my head for the novel I'm writing. I also find it useful to map out the "Five Commandments" of each scene before I write it. This has enabled me to move from an average of 250 words per day up to an average of 750 words per day because, before I even start writing, I *know* where the current scene starts, where it's going, and I have a rough idea of how it gets from point A to point B. It makes my work *a lot* more productive. It also means that, when I write something that does *not* "work," I recognize it pretty quickly. As an example, yesterday, I realized a scene I had written was purely expositional. I could cut it out completely, and the story wouldn't be affected, so I added a complication, crisis, and resolution to the scene, and it became a vital part of the story.

Get the book. Read the book. Listen to the podcast. They go hand-in-hand wonderfully. I don't think you'll be disppointed.

Bob'516 ,

The Kangaroo Question

After listening to the first two episodes I found some interesting points being brought up. When something so patently obvious is discussed, that a book about a kanagroo detective won't sell well unless there is a kanagroo on the cover, I'm wasting my time. I might give it a few more episodes, but if there is more such innane discussions, I will unsubscribe. I should spend my time writing than listening to that which any thoughtful writer should already know.

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