6 episodes

Teach Talk Listen Learn is a podcast featuring conversations about teaching and learning at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Join host Bob Dignan and his guests as they shine a spotlight on the innovative and creative ways faculty and instructors across campus are shaking up the hallowed halls of academia to engage traditional and nontraditional students in all modalities and create transformative learning experiences for them. 
 
This podcast is produced by the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning at the University of Illinois. Episodes can be found on our website, citl.illinois.edu, and major podcast platforms. Email us: ttll@illinois.edu. We hope you’ll find us there and join the conversation! 

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Teach Talk Listen Learn Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

Teach Talk Listen Learn is a podcast featuring conversations about teaching and learning at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Join host Bob Dignan and his guests as they shine a spotlight on the innovative and creative ways faculty and instructors across campus are shaking up the hallowed halls of academia to engage traditional and nontraditional students in all modalities and create transformative learning experiences for them. 
 
This podcast is produced by the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning at the University of Illinois. Episodes can be found on our website, citl.illinois.edu, and major podcast platforms. Email us: ttll@illinois.edu. We hope you’ll find us there and join the conversation! 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Embodied Learning

    Embodied Learning

    Episode Transcript available here. 

    About the guests Robb Lindgren is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology in the College of Education.  
     
    Ava Wolf is an assistant director at the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning. 

    Episode Resources Lindgren, R., DeLiema, D. Viewpoint, embodiment, and roles in STEM learning technologies. Education Tech Research Dev (2022) 

    Episode Summary This episode explores embodied learning—using expression, gestures, and body movement to deepen the learning process. 
     
    And yes, it’s okay to chuckle that this topic is being featured on a listen-only podcast, according to host Bob Dignan. He invites you to picture him and guests—Robb Lindgren (Education) and Ava Wolf (CITL)—using facial expressions, hand gestures, and other movements throughout their conversation—and join in. 
     
    Lindgren does research on how people learn with emerging technologies such as virtual and augmented reality and interactive simulation and is particularly curious about the ways you can make interactions with these technologies more physical. 
     
    “We take those things really seriously because we think that there’s a tight-knit relationship between how we move … our body, and how we think … and how people learn,” he says, adding that just getting up and looking at an object from another angle can broaden one’s perspective. 
     
    While an avid proponent, Lindgren advises there are right—and wrong—approaches to incorporating it into learning. 
     
    It doesn’t mean putting treadmills in every classroom, having students do jumping jacks when solving word problems, or incorporating “movement for the sake of movement.” It must be done in a way that’s meaningful to the learning objectives and content. And don’t use AR, VR, or other technology just to replicate something that can be done in the real world. 
    “It’s about finding things that you can’t do,” he says. “I can’t fly. I can’t shrink down to the microscopic level to see cells. 
     
    “What we want to do is create these very nurturing and supportive situations with the technologies that we have available to us … so it’s not just replicating the lecture but creating these better learning opportunities and experiences.” 
     
    Listen to this episode for the full discussion, including some of the research projects Lindgren is working on, the importance of designing conducive learning environments, how to engage introverted students, and how to introduce embodied learning into your course. 
     
    Did you enjoy this episode, or do you have a story to share about your teaching? Drop us a note at ttll@illinois.edu. 
     
    This podcast was produced by the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning at the University of Illinois. Episodes can be found on our website, citl.illinois.edu, and major podcast platforms. We hope you’ll find us there and join the conversation! 

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 36 min
    Giving Feedback on Student Writing

    Giving Feedback on Student Writing

    Episode transcript available here.

    About the guests Carolyn Wisniewski is Director of the Writer’s Workshop. View her recent publications on Illinois Experts. 
     
    Lucas Anderson is a Specialist in Education at CITL. Check out his blog where he writes about developing a teaching philosophy statement and other teaching topics. 

    Other resources Read more on these topics in these Writers Workshop articles: 
    Responding to Student Writing 
    Teaching Linguistically Diverse Writers 
    Preventing Plagiarism 

    Episode Summary This episode delves into writing—specifically, how instructors can help students improve. 
     
    Who better to weigh in than Carolyn Wisniewski, Director of the Writer’s Workshop, which supports members of the campus community in all stages of their writing through consultations, presentations, and writing groups, and Lucas Anderson, a CITL Specialist in Education, who trains instructors and runs the biannual Graduate Academy, which trains all incoming graduate teaching assistants. 
     
    As host Bob Dignan points out, evaluating student writing and offering constructive criticism can be both time consuming and challenging. How can instructors do this effectively and efficiently? 
     
    In this episode, Dignan and his guests touch on many aspects from students’ struggles and successes in their writing to effective evaluation strategies to the importance of offering constructive criticism to teaching the fundamentals while recognizing students’ linguistic diversity and respecting their backgrounds.
     
    Anderson shares a technique he learned from Wisniewski: Read through the entire paper, summarize comments at the end—including the best thing and something that needs improvement in the next draft—and if there’s time, make limited comments in the margin to address specific errors.
     
    “This notion of summarizing it at the end and really distilling the main message as kind of the primary thing I hope they look at has really helped me,” says Anderson, who uses the technique when helping graduate students craft their teaching philosophy statement.
     
    “In my field, we teach HOCs before LOCs,” adds Wisniewski, who wants instructors to focus on higher order concerns (e.g., do students understand the assignment and does the paper have structure) then move on to the lower order concerns (e.g., grammar and syntax) during the revision process.
     
    Drop us a note at ttll@illinois.edu. This podcast was produced by the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning at the University of Illinois.

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    • 38 min
    Reflection

    Reflection

    Episode transcript here.

    Episode Description In this episode, host Bob Dignan welcomes Ava Wolf (CITL) and Nic Flores (Latina/Latino Studies) to the studio where Flores reflects on his teaching philosophy statement and how he merged it with the realities of his semester. 
    Flores touches on various ways his teaching practices reflect his philosophy, including structuring the learning community (classroom) with no hierarchical order, sitting with his students in a circle when possible, calling each other by their names and using each others’ preferred pronouns, and co-creating ground guides (rules) and knowledge production. Another practice –no final exams. Instead, students write a paper reflecting on their research they and their learning process and then share those thoughts with their peers. 
    “It’s all about the process for me,” says Flores, who believes reflection at different points in the semester promotes deeper learning. “I think I’m learning … that learning is a lifelong process. It’s not these four years of undergrad education or even the … five-plus years of post-undergrad of education. It’s about learning and the process and not the product.” 
     
    Did you enjoy this episode, or do you have a story to share about your experience with reflection or another teaching topic? Drop us a note at ttll@illinois.edu. 
     
    This podcast was produced by the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning at the University of Illinois. Episodes can be found on our website, citl.illinois.edu, and major podcast platforms. We hope you’ll find us there and join the conversation! 
     
    About our guests Nic Flores is an assistant professor in the Department of Latina/Latino Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He specializes in public and sexual health, HIV/AIDS prevention, ethnography, comparative ethnic and racial studies, and gender and sexuality studies with additional interests in queer of color critique, disability studies, and feminist science and technology studies. 
     
    Ava Wolf is an assistant director at the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning. 
     
    Other resources Nic Flores’ teaching statement. 
     
    Learn more about the Teaching Philosophy Statement and find resources to help you get started. 
    Read this paper, “Best practices for using critical reflection to improve your teaching”. 
     
    Learn more about Instructional Spaces. 

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    • 31 min
    What’s the Big Idea?

    What’s the Big Idea?

    Episode Transcript available here.

    Episode DescriptionIn this episode, Cheelan Bo-Linn (CITL) and Yilan Xu (ACES) join host Bob Dignan to unpack the graphic syllabus. A misnomer of sorts, the graphic syllabus doesn’t focus on classroom policies and procedures, due dates, and a wordy course description, which can create a disconnect with students. Instead, it visually lays out the main learning objective the instructor wants students to get out of the course – or what Bo-Linn calls “the Big Idea” – and how they will go about learning it. It also helps set the tone for the class. 
     
    “It’s more like a tool to help you rethink what’s the most important thing in your class and how you organize all your materials around it,” says Xu, who worked with Bo-Linn to drill down to the Big Idea of her Retirement Benefits Planning course and create an interactive, evolving graphic, which the class revisits throughout the semester to see where they, how far they’ve come, and what’s to come. 
    Xu outlines the process she used and a few iterations of her Big Idea, and Bo-Linn provides some creative examples from instructors in other disciplines. 
    “I would hope it would be an inspiration to encourage faculty members to just try this,” says Xu, who also reports what students think about it. 
     
    Did you enjoy this episode, or do you have a story to share about your experience with creating a graphic syllabus or another teaching topic? Drop us a note at ttll@illinois.edu. 
     
    This podcast was produced by the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning at the University of Illinois. Episodes can be found on our website, citl.illinois.edu, and major podcast platforms. We hope you’ll find us there and join the conversation! 
     
    About the guests Cheelan Bo-Linn is a senior specialist in education at the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning. 
     
    Yilan Xu is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics. 
     
    Other resources See pre- and post-iterations of the Big Idea or graphic syllabi to 2 courses.  
     
    Read about interactive syllabi in this Faculty Focus article, “A Supportive Syllabus: What Students Say About an Interactive Syllabus.” 
     
    Read more here:
    “Revisiting the Syllabus”
    The Syllabus Reconstructed: An Analysis of Traditional and Visual Syllabi for information Retention and Inclusiveness. 

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    • 27 min
    Ungrading

    Ungrading

    Transcript of this episode is available here.
    Our first episode is all about grades – or lack of them to be more precise. 
    We chat with Kary Zarate (Special Education) and Billy Huff (Gender & Women’s Studies and Communication) about Ungrading, and why they're Ungrading in their classrooms, and the educators who inspired them to try. 
    Huff and Zarate share what Ungrading looks like in their classrooms, challenges they’ve encountered, and the impact it’s had on student learning—and themselves, including, as Zarate says, bringing back “the joy of teaching.” 
     
    Did you enjoy this episode, or do you have a story to share about your experience with Ungrading or another teaching topic? Drop us a note at ttll@illinois.edu. 
     
    This podcast was produced by the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning at the University of Illinois. Episodes can be found on our website and major podcast platforms. We hope you’ll find us there and join the conversation! 
     
    About the guests Kary Zarate is a Teaching Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education. Learn more at Kary's profile page.
     
    Billy Huff is a Lecturer in the Departments of Communication and Gender & Women’s Studies. Learn more at Billy's profile page.
     
    View Huff’s Art of Teaching: Lunchtime Seminar Series presentation on “Teaching for Social Justice in the Classroom.” 
     
    Jim Wentworth is Associate Director of Instructional Spaces and Technologies at CITL.
     
    Other resources Jesse Stommel is a faculty member in the University of Denver’s Writing Program, co-founder of Hybrid Pedagogy: The Journal of Critical Digital Pedagogy and Digital Pedagogy Lab (2015-2021); and co-author of An Urgency of Teachers: the Work of Critical Digital Pedagogy. He is online at www.jessestommel.com. 
     
    Jen Newton is an associate professor in special education at Ohio University. View Newton's profile page.

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    • 34 min
    We're starting a podcast!

    We're starting a podcast!

    Transcript of this episode
    Description
    In our trailer, CITL Director Michel Bellini joins host Bob Dignan (CITL) to introduce the Teach, Talk, Listen and Learn podcast, a platform where faculty and instructors across campus can shine a spotlight on the innovative and creative teaching practices and strategies they’ve implemented in and outside of their classrooms to engage students and create transformative learning experiences for them. Guests will share what worked, what didn’t work, what they want to try next time, and hope by doing so, they’ll spark a conversation with the teaching community on campus and across the globe. 
     
    Do you have a story to share about your teaching experiences or a teaching topic? Drop us a note at ttll@illinois.edu. 
     
    This podcast was produced by the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning at the University of Illinois. Episodes can be found on our website and on major podcast platforms. We hope you’ll find us there and join the conversation!
    About the host 
    Bob Dignan is Associate Director of Instructional Media Resources at the Center for Innovation in Teaching and Learning. 
     
    About the guest 
    Michel Bellini is Director of the Center for Innovation in Teaching & Learning and Associate Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology. Learn more at Professor Bellini's profile page.
     
    You can see Bellini in this Art of Teaching: Lunchtime Seminar Series presentation, “What I Know Now: Lessons about Teaching and Learning.” 

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    • 17 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

Speed and Ease ,

Upgrading

Enlighten conversation about improving student learning and engagement. Excellent timing given all the pressure lately on education in the US.

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