181 episodes

Teachers Aid is with Mandy Froehlich and Jon Harper - We've refocused the show on meeting some of the biggest unmet needs every educator has. If you are an educator who gives teaching your all, but still feels that you're not doing enough, this show is for you. Tune in to get social and emotional support for the very personal challenges teachers face. We promise you that you won't hear educators talking like this every day.

Teachers Aid BAM Radio Network

    • Courses
    • 4.8 • 25 Ratings

Teachers Aid is with Mandy Froehlich and Jon Harper - We've refocused the show on meeting some of the biggest unmet needs every educator has. If you are an educator who gives teaching your all, but still feels that you're not doing enough, this show is for you. Tune in to get social and emotional support for the very personal challenges teachers face. We promise you that you won't hear educators talking like this every day.

    Starting a Conversation About Race – Part 2: Keeping the Discussion on Track

    Starting a Conversation About Race – Part 2: Keeping the Discussion on Track

    There’s a rising wave of agreement that the time has finally come to have that long-overdue discussion about race, injustice. In this segment, we talk about how to keep that discussion on track.


    Follow on Twitter: @docjorich@DrDorindaCA @d4griffin3 @jonHarper70bd @froehlichm @bamradionetwork

    Dr. Dorinda Carter Andrews is an internationally-renowned professor and the chairperson for the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University. Her research focuses on racial equity and justice in education and helping school leaders and youth develop and maintain culturally responsive learning environments. She has given two TEDx talks and is widely published on teacher education and culturally relevant teaching. Dr. Joseph B.. Richardson’s research focuses on four critical areas: 1) the intersection of structural and interpersonal violence among Black boys and young Black men 2) the intersection of the healthcare and criminal justice systems among violently injured young Black men; 3) violence prevention and intervention programming; 4) parenting and youth strategies for negotiating the social context of violence among low-income Black boys and young Black men. He is the Co-Founder and former Co-Director of the Capital Region Violence Intervention Program (CAP-VIP), a hospital-based violence intervention program, at the University of Maryland Prince George’s Hospital Center. He is the Executive Director of the Transformative Research and Applied Violence Intervention Lab (TRAVAIL). Dennis Griffin, Jr. serves as the principal of Prairie Elementary School and is pursuing his doctoral studies in Educational Leadership at Cardinal Stritch University. Dennis is a servant leader that seeks to build collaborative cultures that enhance the future for ALL students, educators, and communities at large.

    • 12 min
    How to Start the Conversation – Part 1: Race, Injustice, Unconscious Biases

    How to Start the Conversation – Part 1: Race, Injustice, Unconscious Biases

    There’s a rising wave of agreement that the time has finally come to have that long-overdue discussion about race, injustice, and our differing views about systemic bias. Join us as we make our own humble attempt to start that discussion.


    Follow on Twitter: @docjorich@DrDorindaCA @d4griffin3 @jonHarper70bd @froehlichm @bamradionetwork

    Dr. Dorinda Carter Andrews is an internationally-renowned professor and the chairperson for the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University. Her research focuses on racial equity and justice in education and helping school leaders and youth develop and maintain culturally responsive learning environments. She has given two TEDx talks and is widely published on teacher education and culturally relevant teaching. Dr. Joseph B.. Richardson’s research focuses on four critical areas: 1) the intersection of structural and interpersonal violence among Black boys and young Black men 2) the intersection of the healthcare and criminal justice systems among violently injured young Black men; 3) violence prevention and intervention programming; 4) parenting and youth strategies for negotiating the social context of violence among low-income Black boys and young Black men. He is the Co-Founder and former Co-Director of the Capital Region Violence Intervention Program (CAP-VIP), a hospital-based violence intervention program, at the University of Maryland Prince George’s Hospital Center. He is the Executive Director of the Transformative Research and Applied Violence Intervention Lab (TRAVAIL). Dennis Griffin, Jr. serves as the principal of Prairie Elementary School and is pursuing his doctoral studies in Educational Leadership at Cardinal Stritch University. Dennis is a servant leader that seeks to build collaborative cultures that enhance the future for ALL students, educators, and communities at large.

    • 13 min
    Feel Better and Teach Better by Letting Go of Your Inner Super Teacher

    Feel Better and Teach Better by Letting Go of Your Inner Super Teacher

    Yes, it feels good to be viewed as a rockstar, superhero teacher. But the image of the super teacher can create unrealistic and ultimately harmful expectations. Join us for a look at why we need to shatter the myth of the superhero teacher for our wellbeing and the betterment of our students.
    Follow on Twitter: @RoxannaElden @jonHarper70bd @froehlichm @bamradionetwork


    Roxanna Elden’s teacher advice book, See Me After Class: Advice for Teachers by Teachers, has long been a staple in many school districts and training programs. Her recently released novel, Adequate Yearly Progress, follows several teachers as their professional lives impact their personal lives and vice versa. (Washington Post calls it “a funny but insightful look at teachers in the workplace… reminiscent of the TV show The Office, but set in an urban high school.”)

    • 12 min
    Teaching Remotely Can Be Exhausting: Five Ideas to Help You Teach With a Full Tank

    Teaching Remotely Can Be Exhausting: Five Ideas to Help You Teach With a Full Tank

    Teaching remotely, in a crisis, with inadequate preparation can quickly drain the patience, energy, and creativity we need to teach well. Join us as we discuss ideas to make sure we are teaching with a full tank. Follow on Twitter: @jonHarper70bd @froehlichm @bamradionetwork@theWellEd Kiesha Easley is a certified educator with over 17 years of teaching experience. She is a burnout survivor. A few years ago, burnout and chronic fatigue led her on a health journey that enabled her to shed 75 pounds and recover her lost energy. With renewed strength, she became inspired to help other educators experience the same level of rejuvenation, so she founded Well Ed and began serving as a wellness coach for educators. www.theWellEd.com. Robert C. Schmidt, Ed.D, LCPC, NCC is a national speaker and consultant on building sustainable school mental health and suicide prevention programs centered on data collection, outcomes, quality of services, and student achievement. With interests embedded in research, Dr. Schmidt has published chapters in recognized books including the award-winning book by Dr. Kathryn Seifert, How Children Become Violent (2006) and Youth Violence (2011). He has led studies in the field of youth suicide, school mental health and was a contributor to Preventing Suicide: A Toolkit for High Schools: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). In 2009 Dr. Schmidt published and is the author of the Risk Identification Suicide Kit (RISK) and in 2018 the RISK2, a suicide assessment instrument for ages 7-24. Dr. Schmidt previously worked at Johns Hopkins BayView Campus in Baltimore, Maryland and provided coverage to the Johns Hopkins Psychiatric Children’s Center, Baltimore Adolescent Treatment Program, Outpatient Clinic, and 24-hour Baltimore Child & Adolescent Crisis Response Team. He is the Mental Health Coordinator for Talbot County Public Schools and provides outpatient mental health services in Centreville, MD.

    • 12 min
    Teaching During a Pandemic: Self Care is Good, Self Compassion Is Better

    Teaching During a Pandemic: Self Care is Good, Self Compassion Is Better

    As the pandemic-driven demands placed on teachers escalates, the need for self-care and self-compassion are rising as well. Join us as we clarify the difference between the two and discuss how we can do both better.

    Follow on Twitter: @jonHarper70bd @froehlichm @stantonalana @self_compassion @bamradionetwork

    Kristin Neff is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. She is a pioneer in the field of self-compassion research, conducting the first empirical studies on self-compassion over fifteen years ago. She has co-developed an empirically-supported training program called Mindful
    Self-Compassion, and is author of the books Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself, Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook, and Teaching the Mindful Self-Compassion Program: A Guide for Professionals and founder of www.self-compassion.org. Alana Stanton is a kindergarten teacher at Mulberry Elementary in Gwinnett County, Georgia. She has taught several grades over her 15-year career including K-3 literacy special, first grade, second grade, kindergarten, and technology special. Alana believes that relationships always come first in the classroom and the classroom should be a place where students thrive academically, socially, and emotionally. She currently writes for her blog, More Than A Lesson

    http://morethanalessonst.blogspot.com/ where she shares the stories of her classroom and her heart.

    • 12 min
    Three Ways to Create, Grow, Thrive, and Rise above the COVID-19 Mindset

    Three Ways to Create, Grow, Thrive, and Rise above the COVID-19 Mindset

    In this episode, we look at ways we can rise above this difficult moment by changing our routine and embracing creative, enriching, and uplifting activities.

    Follow on Twitter: @jonHarper70bd @froehlichm @bamradionetwork @DrKpsychologist @CoachHawkinsUMES

    Jelena Kecmanovic, Ph.D is the founding director of the Arlington/DC Behavior Therapy Institute and an adjunct professor of psychology at Georgetown University.  In addition to academic articles, she has written for the Washington Post, The Conversation, Psychology Today Magazine, and others. Shelton Hawkins is a father of three former college basketball coach, now a high school art teacher. His main focus is putting creative art on run down outdoor basketball courts to help with community engagement.

    • 9 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

G-Big2DogD-NizzleSkeezyWeezy ,

Hip Hughes = liquid Au

Keith understands we need our advice in quick, thought-provoking bursts. We're busy...we're beyond busy. And short 3-4 minute podcasts are just the thing to help us grow. Thanks!

thatguyjamal ,

Honest and helpful

As a beginning teacher this podcast has helped to prep me for what I may see. By learning from experienced educators who are being very candid about techniques and on the ground experience I'm confident in a few things. Yes I said a few. I'm being honest with myself that I know I won't know what the heck I'm doing for a while. But I'll continue to use the tricks and tips learned here. Thank you Rae and all the guests that you have on!

MusicM0M ,

I LOVE Teacher's Aid and Rae Pica!

I am a student teacher, and it is so awesome to get this valuable information from seasoned educators even BEFORE I start teaching full-time. Thank you Rae for hosting these amazing shows!

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