10 episodes

Teachers in the Movement is an oral history project that explores teachers’ ideas and pedagogy inside and outside the classroom during the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. The Teachers in the Movement podcast features the voices and stories of teachers throughout the South as well as practical advice and ideas for teachers, parents and citizens who want to talk about race and democracy.

Teachers in the Movement Podcast The Teachers in the Movement Project at CRPES

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Teachers in the Movement is an oral history project that explores teachers’ ideas and pedagogy inside and outside the classroom during the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. The Teachers in the Movement podcast features the voices and stories of teachers throughout the South as well as practical advice and ideas for teachers, parents and citizens who want to talk about race and democracy.

    Mr. Edward Newton Made the Most of Limited Options

    Mr. Edward Newton Made the Most of Limited Options

    Mr. Edward Newton grew up in South Carolina in the 40s and 50s. After High School and serving in the military, he followed in his mother's footsteps and became a teacher and then an administrator. In this episode he talks about his mother's creativity in the classroom, his upbringing, and why he got his graduate degree in New York City.

    • 27 min
    Ms. Lillian Carter Knew Her Students Needed a Full Stomach to Learn

    Ms. Lillian Carter Knew Her Students Needed a Full Stomach to Learn

    Ms. Lillian Carter never planned to be a teacher. Just before finishing college, her mother asked her to sign up for student teaching and she never looked back. In this episode she talks about planning a trip for her students following the Underground Railroad, her unconventional student teaching experience, and her commitment to showing her students love.

    Find your local Association for Study of African American Life and Culture (ASAHL)
    https://asalh.org

    • 28 min
    Mrs. Judith Anderson Was Destined for International Experiences

    Mrs. Judith Anderson Was Destined for International Experiences

    Judith Anderson was destined for international experiences. After spending a few years living in Germany and traveling all over Europe with her husband during his military deployment, Judith Anderson moved back to Virginia and shared those experiences with the students in her French class. In addition to teaching the language, Mrs. Anderson worked to broaden her students horizons and give them a global perspective in the midst of a fraught desegregation process in the Richmond city schools. In addition to her service as a teacher, Mrs. Anderson also discusses her distinguished career as a public servant, serving as Legislative Aide to the first Black governor of Virginia, Douglas Wilder, and in subsequent gubernatorial administrations. 

    You can read Dr. Carmen Foster’s dissertation "Tension, Resistance, and Transition: School Desegregation in Richmond's North Side, 1960-63” Here: Carmen_F_Foster_Dissertation_May2014.pdf 

    Listen to the Gary Flowers Morning show https://www.garylflowers.com 
    Monday Through Friday From 9 to 11 a.m. on WREI 101.3 FM

    • 42 min
    Reverend Dr. Grady Powell Practiced What He Preached

    Reverend Dr. Grady Powell Practiced What He Preached

    Reverend Dr. Grady Powell was always an activist. He spent his career both teaching and preaching and in both roles, he encouraged his students and his congregants to get involved in social justice movements. He led by example, challenging the white power structure in the school board, the voting registrar’s office, the local newspaper, and in the streets, including at the famous Selma march. In this interview he talks about his favorite teacher from his Rosenwald schooling in Brunswick County, Virginia, his creative classroom assignments, and taking over leadership of Gilfield Baptist Church from famed Civil Rights activist, Wyatt Tee Walker.

    • 1 hr
    Ms. Carolyn Addison is a Third-Generation Teacher

    Ms. Carolyn Addison is a Third-Generation Teacher

    Ms. Carolyn Addison says that teaching is in her DNA. Her grandmother, Estella Beck, started a school in Mississippi in the early 1900s. In this episode, we’ll talk about freedman’s schools like Estella Beck’s, Ms. Addison’s own experiences as a teacher, guidance counselor, and desegregator, and her experience witnessing an infamous act of racial violence at Jackson State College in 1970. 

    Our theme music is Summer Night by Vanilla. You can find their music at vanillabeats.bandcamp.com

    • 33 min
    Dr. Owen Cardwell Desegregated E.C. Glass High School in 1962

    Dr. Owen Cardwell Desegregated E.C. Glass High School in 1962

    Dr. Owen Cardwell had a winding path to becoming an educator. These days he’s a Professor at the University of Lynchburg. On his way there, he was one of the first Black students to desegregate E.C. Glass High School in Lynchburg, he participated in and led many civil rights demonstrations, served in the military, and served over fifty years as a Baptist preacher. He talks about those experiences and the importance of strength-based learning and individualized education. 

    Our theme music is Summer Night by Vanilla. You can find their music at vanillabeats.bandcamp.com 
    All other music is from Blue Dot Sessions.

    • 33 min

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