37 episodes

Description: What we don’t know about American slavery hurts us all. Teaching Hard History brings us the lessons we should have learned in school through the voices of leading scholars, educators, and your host Hasan Kwame Jeffries. It’s good advice for teachers, good information for everybody.

Teaching Hard History: American Slavery Teaching Tolerance

    • Courses
    • 4.9, 268 Ratings

Description: What we don’t know about American slavery hurts us all. Teaching Hard History brings us the lessons we should have learned in school through the voices of leading scholars, educators, and your host Hasan Kwame Jeffries. It’s good advice for teachers, good information for everybody.

    Wrap Up: Teaching the Connections – w/ Bethany Jay

    Wrap Up: Teaching the Connections – w/ Bethany Jay

    The systems that enabled and perpetuated African and Indigenous enslavement in what is now the U.S. have much in common, and their histories tell us a great deal about the present. Professors Bethany Jay and Steven Oliver join us to talk about connections between the first two seasons and how to teach them, and we preview what’s to come in season three.

    • 1 hr 28 min
    Hard History in Hard Times – Talking With Teachers

    Hard History in Hard Times – Talking With Teachers

    In this special call-in episode, listeners share their stories and questions from throughout season 2—including teaching remotely, working with families and stakeholders, and incorporating social justice into subjects like math and science. As educators, we’re strongest when we support each other. And you’ll hear great suggestions from fellow teachers, like resources from Fairfax County Public Schools in Virginia. And of course, you'll find more resources, links and a transcript on our website. 

    • 57 min
    Call Us! (by Sunday, April 19)

    Call Us! (by Sunday, April 19)

    It’s time for our first call-in show! We know things are chaotic for you and every other educator right now. We feel it too, so this seems like the perfect time to talk. Pick up the phone and dial 888-59-STORY (888-597-8679). Our lines are open until Sunday night, April 19. Teaching hard history is even harder right now, so let’s talk about resources you can use if you’re teaching virtually. Ask us your questions; tell us your stories. And let us know how you’re doing.

    • 10 min
    Inseparable Separations: Slavery and Indian Removal

    Inseparable Separations: Slavery and Indian Removal

    Indian Removal was a brutal and complicated effort that textbooks often simplify. It is also inseparably related to slavery. Enslavers seeking profit drove demand for Indigenous lands, displacing hundreds of thousands of Indigenous people. Some of these Indigenous people participated in chattel slavery. Focusing on the Chickasaw and Choctaw nations, this episode pulls the lens back to show how Removal and enslavement must be taught together too fully understand the hard history of American enslavement.

    • 59 min
    Slave Codes, Liberty Suits and the Charter Generation – w/ Margaret Newell

    Slave Codes, Liberty Suits and the Charter Generation – w/ Margaret Newell

    The Americas were built on the lands, labor and lives of Indigenous peoples. Despite being erased from history textbooks after the so-called first Thanksgiving, Indigenous peoples did not disappear. Colonial settlers relied on the cooperation, exploitation and forced labor of their Native neighbors to survive and thrive in what became North America. Focusing on New England, historian Margaret Newell introduces us to the Charter Generation of systematically enslaved people across this continent.

    • 1 hr 21 min
    Using the WPA Slave Narratives – w/ Cynthia Lynn Lyerly

    Using the WPA Slave Narratives – w/ Cynthia Lynn Lyerly

    From 1936 to 1938, the Federal Writers’ Project collected stories from people who had been enslaved. The WPA Slave Narrative Collection at the Library of Congress is a valuable resource; these oral histories are also problematic. Interpreting these narratives within literary and historical context, students can develop primary source literacy. Historian Cynthia Lynn Lyerly outlines unique insights these texts can add to your curriculum.

    • 1 hr 5 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
268 Ratings

268 Ratings

$ boy ,

Essential

This podcast should be required for every educator—especially K-12 teachers—in America. Beyond that, this is essential listening for every American. We cannot move forward and make a better America without understanding how this country was built and how we continue to benefit from slavery today. This podcast is brilliantly constructed and deeply informative—it’s compelling and I’m grateful to all who brought it into being.

shermonno1 ,

A must listen for anyone who wants to dig deeper!

While I am not an educator not a student at the moment, I thoroughly enjoy this podcast and what it offers in helping understand history in a different light. It doesn’t hold back on presenting information that is oftentimes intentionally omitted or watered down in society and institutions at large. At the same time, it does its job in emboldening educators to teach even “the hard history” in a way their students can learn, relate and understand. For this, it works for any and all. Highly recommended.

Rowharder ,

A must-listen for Educators

This is a must-listen for anyone who teaches American History, but also anyone who wants to do better, in terms of understanding our past and reshaping the future. I will be sharing with my colleagues and social media groups and I hope they really choose to give it a go!

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