155 episodes

Welcome the Tech-Entrepreneur-on-a-Mission podcast. The goal I have with this podcast is two-fold:
to inspire ‘new forms of value creation’ by sharing compelling ideas and stories about the potential we can unlock when technology and people blend in the right way.Share experiences from tech-entrepreneurs like you about what it requires to create a remarkable software business and how to overcome the roadblocks to do so.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tech-Entrepreneur-on-a-Mission Podcas‪t‬ Ton Dobbe

    • Technology
    • 5.0 • 16 Ratings

Welcome the Tech-Entrepreneur-on-a-Mission podcast. The goal I have with this podcast is two-fold:
to inspire ‘new forms of value creation’ by sharing compelling ideas and stories about the potential we can unlock when technology and people blend in the right way.Share experiences from tech-entrepreneurs like you about what it requires to create a remarkable software business and how to overcome the roadblocks to do so.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    A story about creating extremely sticky technology that marketers actually want to use

    A story about creating extremely sticky technology that marketers actually want to use

    This podcast interview focuses on product innovation that has the power to change the way that marketers create. My guest is R.J. Talyor, CEO and Founder of Pattern89
    R.J. has been a B2B software entrepreneur for well over 15 years. He fulfilled various roles ranging from strategist, director Product Marketing and VP of Mobile Products at ExactTarget, became VP of Messaging Products at Salesforce, and served as the VP of Product Management at Geofeedia. He’s recognized as one of the Indianapolis business Journal’s 40 Under 40.
    In 2016 he founded Pattern89. With this company he’s on a mission is to inspire creativity – and to build something that will change marketing forever. 
    Their strong believe is that AI will make brands, agencies, and marketers more creative, and more human in an increasingly automated world.
    This inspired me, and hence I invited R.J. to my podcast. We explore what’s broken in marketing – especially on the creative side. We discuss how marketing is becoming more and more metrics driven, while we still make creative decisions based on gut-feel (often by the highest paid person in the room). We also dig into what it takes to build a remarkable software business – creating software that’s extremely sticky – software that people want to use.
    Here are some of his quotes:
    Marketers spend a ton of time on audience development, on reach, on frequency. Everyone talks about journeys, but they don't talk about creative.
    What I saw was that there's a better way to create what images or videos or copy that you see, and machine learning provides marketers with tools to allow them to do that, like never before. So, the big problem is how do we get more efficient at the creative process, without asking marketers to act more like machines?
    What they want to do is understand if their idea is going to work or not. And so marketers are kind of trained themselves into machines to try to compute that when we should say: “Hey, no, no human marketer, go create something else. You're the creator, you're the idea person, you're the idea. Machine machines can come up with ideas, let the machines simulator validate what's gonna work, and you human, you do what humans can do best.”
    During this interview, you will learn four things:
    That very often stickiness of your applications increase not by building a better User Interface to perform a task, but by making it magically happenHow you can help your customers make a difference is by avoiding the ‘highest paid person in the room’ to feel inclined to make a decisionWhy your future success and momentum can be hidden in killing your darlings i.e., get rid of those things you’re just hooked to.How Data-Coop across your customers can shift from a nice to have into your primary selling point
    For more information about the guest from this week:
    R.J. TalyorWebsite Pattern89

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    • 40 min
    How leveraging technology can help to eliminate bad customer support experiences from the world

    How leveraging technology can help to eliminate bad customer support experiences from the world

    This podcast interview focuses on product innovation that has the power to engage your support team and empower them to do their best work. My guest is Justin Winter, Co-founder and CEO of Boostopia.
    He has been an advisor to over a dozen companies and acted in a consulting capacity with over 150+ consumer brands and technology companies across areas of growth, retention, product, and operations. 
    Justin studied for his Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing from Liberty University in Lynchburg, VA. 
    In 2010 he co-founded Diamond Candles, the fastest growing and largest online  home fragrance brand in the world. He lead the company as the CEO for 5 years.
    In that process he became frustrated with the solutions available to him to deliver customer support that his customers loved. So he decided to set out to assemble a team to lead to build what he wish he would have had during his tenure there. 
    This became the spark that started Boostopia of which Justin is the the Co-founder and CEO. Boostopia is a technology company that helps B2C companies decrease the number of tickets they get, discover ways to efficiently manage support issues, and transform support into a new revenue generating channel.
    This inspired me, and hence I invited Justin to my podcast. We explore why bad customer support still exists and why the current approach of focusing on the support agent is not enough to solve it. We also discuss the opportunities to turn the support department from a cost-centre into a profit-centre, and the opportunity to increase the wage of support team members by a mere 50% as a consequence of that.
    Here are some of his quotes:
    We fundamentally believe that the way to create better customer experiences isn't by getting the latest and greatest fancy ticketing system. It's really about engaging your support team that you have and empowering them to do their best work.
    Why does customer support, from our perspective as a consumer, why is it so horrible? We all hate talking to customer support. We have lots of frustrating experiences. So, we fundamentally believe that the reason why bad customer support still exists. It's not because companies don't know that that's happening. It's because they don't have an underlying attribution model for understanding how those bad experiences lead to them making less money.
    During this interview, you will learn four things:
    How to spark momentum by overwhelming your users with opportunity i.e. give them a clear picture of the value they are creating with your productHow to find balance in your investment between ‘selling what you got’ versus making ‘the next big thing.’ Why companies that bet on product-led growth are proportionally better rewarded than those that are sales led.Why you’d drive more value for your customers by instead of helping them be more efficient, help them eliminate the underlying problem all together.
    For more information about the guest from this week:
    Justin WinterWebsite Boostopia

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    • 49 min
    Mastering the art of driving a 3-4x uplift of companies coming to your website without dramatically transforming cost

    Mastering the art of driving a 3-4x uplift of companies coming to your website without dramatically transforming cost

    This podcast interview focuses on product innovation that has the power to help marketers to build the meaningful relationships with the right companies. My guest is Riaz Kanani, Founder and CEO of Radiate B2B.
    Riaz is a mix of marketer, technologist and entrepreneur who worked with cutting edge technologies throughout his career, whether it be the nascent flash/java video space in the early 2000s to combining email, mobile and social media marketing technologies in 2008. Throughout it all, he’s used data as the backbone behind these technologies to better understand how people behave and use these new approaches. In that journey he founded 6 companies and worked for IBM, Lyris, Alchemy Worx and Profusion. He’s also a mentor at Techstars.
    Today he’s helping to build a better way to do B2B Marketing that increases both average contract values and the speed of closing contracts.
    And this resonated with me, and hence I invited Riaz to my podcast. We explore what’s broken in marketing automation and why the answer is in choosing a different approach, not in more tools.
    We also discuss what it takes to succeed in B2B software, and what decisions and mindsets are fundamental to stand out.
    Here are some of his quotes:
    It became really clear when talking to those companies that we've become in the b2b or business marketing space, very reliant on content and events to drive lead acquisition, nurturing, email marketing obviously as well. Basically, we were all reliant on exactly the same things, and b2b marketing would become homogenous. And the only way to stand out was really to be doing better creative. And I think that's a marketer’s worst nightmare.
    I felt that there had to be a better way.
    The more I looked at it, the more I realized that if you were building a marketing automation company today, you wouldn't build a platform that looked anything like the marketing automation platforms that exist today.
    During this interview, you will learn four things:
    That there’s no nice handbook that tells you exactly what’s going to happen with your software business: so, to succeed it’s your duty to hire people that can think on their feetWhy your marketing will become exponentially better if you start thinking about the world as being a list of companies that you build relationships withHow defensible differentiation can be created by blending a strong product with an irresistible business model.That your decision how to position yourselves in a space can create a significant problem around your messaging
    For more information about the guest from this week:
    Riaz KananiWebsite Radiate B2B

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    • 41 min
    The art of creating technology that makes users feel good about themselves

    The art of creating technology that makes users feel good about themselves

    This podcast interview focuses on product innovation that has the power to radically evolve the way people search and transact property. My guest is Bobby Bryant, Founder and CEO of Doss.
    Bobby has been in real estate for 20 years. He began his journey in the mortgage business. In 2008, he took one year off to relentlessly study and understand the collective real estate industry, what happened, and what's to come. That sparked the idea to found DOSS. 
    DOSS is on a mission to develop the best technology to make homeownership in America more affordable.
    This inspired me, and hence I invited Bobby to be a guest on my podcast. We explore what’s broken in the Real Estate industry when it comes to finding and buying properties. We dig into the opportunity to create a win-win approach i.e. a world where nobody has to lose, and how technology and data has a fundamental roll in realizing this. Finally we discuss what it takes to build a software business people would miss if it was gone. 
    Here are some of his quotes:
    Every industry in the country has become more automated and economical.
    If you think about the promise of technology it was to do two things. The promise of technology was to save us time and money. So, in real estate, when you think of all of the technological advancements of today, yet the cost of transact real estate hadn't changed.
    The biggest issue for a lot of people is the barrier of entry of costs to get into a home. Or a seller who has a million-dollar house and to give away $60,000 of their equity. How can we be in 2020 charging the same fee that we charged in the early 1900s?
    The real estate industry struggles with a win-win. Why does somebody have to lose in this equation?

    During this interview, you will learn four things:
    How a position of advantage can be created if we think about win-win i.e. provide unique value to both parties at the table – not just one.Why instead of talking like a rocket scientist you should soften your message and talk like a truck driver Why the companies of the future are going to be the companies that figure out how to make people feel good, and feel good about themselves Why you have to be prepared to pay attention for continuous evolution. 
    For more information about the guest from this week:
    Bobby BryanWebsite Doss

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    • 41 min
    6 ways Technology can help companies innovate out of the Coronavirus Downturn

    6 ways Technology can help companies innovate out of the Coronavirus Downturn

    This podcast interview focuses on a discussion around the essence of the book ‘The Innovation Ultimatum – how 6 technologies reshape every business in the 2020s. My guest is Steve Brown, Author and Founder of Possibility & Purpose.
    Steve Brown is a futurist, author, entrepreneur, and advisor with over 30 years of experience in high tech. Prior to building his own consulting business, he was Intel’s Chief Evangelist and worked in Intel Labs as a futurist, where he imagined and built plans for a world 5, 10, and 15 years in the future.
    After leaving Intel in 2016, Steve built his own company, Possibility and Purpose LLC, which helps businesses to be more innovative, more resilient, and more profitable. 
    In 2018 he co-founded The Provenance Chain Network, an open standards approach to bringing transparency to global commerce.
    In 2020, he published his latest book, “The Innovation Ultimatum: How six strategic technologies will reshape every business in the 2020s”
    This inspired me, and hence I invited Steve to my podcast. We explore why the gap between those that embrace the new technologies and those that don’t is going to dramatically widen. Why it’s about agency taking responsibility and decide you’re going to participate in building the future that defines the winners. We also address what’s qualities leaders are required to develop to lead and be remarkable doing so.
    Here are some of his quotes:
    There are two pieces to the innovation ultimatum, there's one that's sort of more obvious on the surface, which is the competitive imperative, which is kind of the stick
    The gap between those that embrace technology, and those that don't, has always been there, but that gap is going to widen dramatically in the next decade
    The other side of the innovation ultimatum is the moral obligation for us as individuals and as companies to do the right thing and to create value for humans and to solve human problems.
    During this interview, you will learn four things:
    That you should ask yourself two questions. What's the future we want to build? And what's the future we want to avoid? That to be great a leader in the 2020s you should be equipped to ask the right questions, become very clear eyed and understand the application of these technologiesWhy the smartest companies are thinking five or six steps ahead and then they work their way back to a starting point.That too much of the ‘innovation’ we put out is still about boosting productivity and efficiency, and that in doing so, we’re leaving so much on the table that we risk irrelevancy.
    For more information about the guest from this week:
    Steve BrownWebsite

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    • 41 min
    How declaring war to a problem helps to save the world

    How declaring war to a problem helps to save the world

    This podcast interview focuses on product innovation that has the power to empowers internet users and content creators with the tools to build a safer and more trustworthy internet. My guest is Sebastiaan van der Lans, Founder and CEO of WordProof and Chairman of Trusted Web Foundation
    Sebastiaan van der Lans has a big heart for open source. In 2006 he co-founded Amsterdam’s first WordPress agency ‘Van Ons’, which is a leading digital agency now, serving over 100M page views a year. 
    Sebastiaan has a strong passion for improving the playing fields of publishing, SEO, and e-commerce.
    In 2019, Sebastiaan founded WordProof with which he’s on a mission to restoring trust on the internet.
    This inspired me, and hence I invited Sebastiaan to my podcast. We explore what’s underpinning the fact the internet is broken when it comes to trust and how this is undermining our progress. We also address how to get a movement going in a situation that’s characterized by multiple ‘chicken & egg’ dilemmas. Finally, we discuss the mindset and approach required to achieve results that have remarkable impact for everyone around the globe.
    Here are some of his quotes:
    Even though the Internet has brought us so many great things, it has a deep-rooted issue. And that's what it's trustworthiness.
    And therefore, all sorts of obnoxious human behaviour, like theft and manipulation and fraud thrive. Normally in society, we have systems in place to make sure that those obnoxious behaviors don't thrive. But on the internet, trust simply isn't part of the internet's DNA. And that goes back to society. 
    So what we say is: “To save the world, we need to fix the internet, we need to make trust part of the internet's DNA.”
    That's what we aim for. And Wordproof is a Time Stamping tool to achieve the mission of the trusted web. 
    In a few years from now, if you don't timestamp your information, you’ll be considered a fraud. What are you hiding from?
    During this interview, you will learn four things:
    That just because technology isn’t scalable or mature enough is no reason to not embrace it.How to solve a business model challenge where the audience that benefits most are not the one that will pay for it.Why it requires to declare war on a specific problem to create solutions that are remarkableWhy spending 1000 hours on a 1-minute pitch pays off
    For more information about the guest from this week:
    Sebastiaan van der LansWebsite WordProof Website The Trusted Web

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    • 47 min

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5.0 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

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