2 episodes

Sysazzle's TechExchange brings together a wide array of technology topics from technology leaders across all industries. Meet technology leaders from across the country and hear their thoughts on where technology is going, current technology trends, specific technologies and more. hireright@sysazzle.com

TechExchange Michael Paradise

    • Technology

Sysazzle's TechExchange brings together a wide array of technology topics from technology leaders across all industries. Meet technology leaders from across the country and hear their thoughts on where technology is going, current technology trends, specific technologies and more. hireright@sysazzle.com

    TechExchange Podcast: Data Fabrics and the Healthcare Industry

    TechExchange Podcast: Data Fabrics and the Healthcare Industry

    Welcome to our podcast, TechExchange! In this episode, we explore data fabrics and its impact on the healthcare industry. Joining us for this discussion is Chris Maresca, a veteran Silicon Valley Executive and currently Chief Technology Officer for Cyberionix.



     



    Transcript:



    00:00:00 - 00:05:08

    STEVE STEVENS: Hello and welcome to TechExchange podcast. I'm your host, Steve Stevens. I'm the Chief Solutions Officer for Sysazzle. The Sysazzle TechExchange podcast was created to bring you highly relevant topics from some amazing technology leaders. Today, we'll be exploring data fabrics and their impact on Health Care. Joining me to discuss the data, data fabrics, and the impact on the health care industry is Chris Maresca. He is a veteran Silicon Valley executive and has joined Cyberionix as Chief Technology Officer. Cyberionix is a leading data fabric provider for healthcare. Hi Chris, welcome!

    CHRIS MARESCA: Thanks, thanks for having me.

    STEVENS: Can you tell us a little bit about yourself so the audience understands your background?

    MARESCA: Yeah, I'm a technologist based in San Francisco, California. I've been in the tech industry now for twenty-five plus years. I've done a dozen startups had six exits including one IPO. I've worked with companies of all types and sizes all the way from small business, to consumer startups, to Fortune 100 companies, helping them figure out their technology strategies and place in the world, especially as technology has been shifting industries around. And now I joined Cyberionix last year and we're focused on the disruption that technology is doing to healthcare, like it has to many other Industries.

    STEVENS: Well, speaking of disruption in a good way, there’s been a lot of focus on data and data fabrics over the last ten years. But most recently, what it can do for the health care industry. So, if we take a look at data fabrics, I mean, are we looking at a function or a technology layer that includes data integration and virtualization or just what is it?

    MARESCA: I mean I think the reality is that all of us in whatever industry we're in or even personally as consumers or just living your life in a modern country, are swimming in a sea of data. The problem, however, is that for most organizations and people it's really hard to pull all of that data into something that's useful and actionable. And the idea of a data fabric is to attempt to organize that data and make it similar enough much like, you know, the threads in fabric are woven together so that it becomes useful and delivers actionable insights into what is going on because it's the needle in the haystack problem. We produce way more data than we can actually consume. There's an insane statistic from the national Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration which has been a big data generator as well as consumer, that's the core of their work. One of their data scientists said even they only use 1% of the data that they generate. So, when you think about those things you think, well, what's the matter with that picture? We're producing all this data, and nobody's actually using it. So, the idea of data fabric is to bring toolsets and technologies and layers of integration and virtualization, in such a way that for an end-user consumer data, who wants actionable insights, they don't have to worry or understand where all of that is coming from and how to massage it into something useful.

    STEVENS: That's amazing. 1%. 1% and the rest of it is just noise and being collected?

    MARESCA: Yeah, it's not necessarily noise. I mean, I'll give you another data point around that. So a few years ago, maybe four years ago, I was talking to the Facebook team that does data analytics at Facebook. So you can say, well no as a government agency so they just don't have the money to process the data. So let's look at Facebook.

    • 23 min
    TechExchange Podcast: The Supply Chain and the Cannabis Industry

    TechExchange Podcast: The Supply Chain and the Cannabis Industry

    Welcome to our podcast, TechExchange! Sysazzle's TechExchange brings together a wide array of technology topics from technology leaders across all industries. Meet technology leaders from across the country and hear their thoughts on where technology is going, current technology trends, specific technologies and more. Let's welcome our first guest, Steve Stevens, formerly VP of IT / now Chief Technology Officer - Sysazzle, as we explore how information technology enables the Cannabis Industry.



     



    Transcript:



    00:00:00 - 00:05:17



    Hello and welcome to the TechExchange Podcast! I'm your host, Phil Hopkins. I'm the Chief Solutions Officer for Sysazzle. The Sysazzle TechExchange Podcast was created to bring you highly relevant topics from some amazing technology leaders. Today will be exploring how information technology enables what may be the fastest growing consumer product category in the United States. The industry we're talking about today is also a major employer providing jobs for a quarter of a million American workers according to market research from New Frontier data. I know you've heard about it. This type of business got started in California but really took off in Colorado and Washington in 2012. In fact you may already be customer. Well what could it be? Some aspect of the gig economy like ride sharing? Well, I'll give you a big hint. Before, I said it was growing. Right, now you've got it. We're talking about technology behind the cannabis or if you prefer the medical and recreational marijuana business. Joining me to discuss the technology side of the legal cannabis industry is Steve Stevens. He was a veteran IT executive and recently lead systems implementations for Harvest Health and Recreation, the leading cannabis manufacturer and retailer headquartered in Arizona. Hi Steve, welcome aboard. Hey Phil, how are you. I'm doing great, thanks. Steve, I know that The cannabis industry especially the legal cannabis Industry is very different than any other industries. It's kind of like parts of the agricultural industry. It's like parts of the alcoholic beverage industry. How's it different from a supply chain perspective from other regulated industry. It's very challenged from a supply chain perspective. Cannabis is illegal at the federal level but has been regal at the state level and more than two dozen states for a while now and every election adds a few more states. However, the supply chain is not allowed to cross state lines and is complicated by the fact that the federal government still considers it an illegal substance. Over the swiping across state lines what type of modifications to the supply chain technology have to be in place? Does it have to remain separate state by state or how does that work? Well to start out with the regulatory environment for that supply chain it gets very complicated because we have state after state implementing its own regulations without any kind of federal oversight homogenizing those regulations. So every state treats it differently. Some for recreational use and others for strictly medical use but it gets even further complicated because of the way it's licensed. In states like California you have separate licenses for those who grow for those who refined the product, process it, for those who distribute and so forth. In other states, it's illegal to have any interoperation between companies so you have one vertical license from growing to selling it in your dispensary and you're not allowed to sell at the wholesale level to other companies. So state by state the rules change and trying to support that from technology standpoint is very complicated. Wow sounds like it. And also I think there's a lot of compliance and oversight requirements that many states put on the industry as well and that also impacts the technology, am I right about that? Yes so the regulatory environment for each state is somewhat different...

    • 22 min

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