22 episodes

Are you looking to hack your own biology with supplements and technology that have been seen by few and probably afforded by even fewer? If so, you've come to the wrong place. This is ‘That's Healthy, Right?’ a scientific look at everything we know about fitness and nutrition, so you can master your own body and live a healthier life.

That's Healthy, Right‪?‬ Adam Bornstein

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0 • 42 Ratings

Are you looking to hack your own biology with supplements and technology that have been seen by few and probably afforded by even fewer? If so, you've come to the wrong place. This is ‘That's Healthy, Right?’ a scientific look at everything we know about fitness and nutrition, so you can master your own body and live a healthier life.

    Can Music Actually Enhance Your Workout?

    Can Music Actually Enhance Your Workout?

    Does listening to music, something many of us do when we exercise, really do anything for your training performance?
    Because it’s such a popular motivator in sports and fitness, it would only make sense that it does something to help. Or, is it magical thinking that your favorite tunes make you stronger or faster?
    Get ready for some good news — and some bad — about how music may affect your workout.
    In this episode of That’s Healthy, Right?, we’ll dig into the research on whether or not music helps increase your maximum strength, how it may actually boost the number of reps you can do, help you push a little bit harder, run a little bit farther, and even recover faster.
    To ask a question, read the transcript, or learn more, visit bornfitness.com/thats-healthy-right.
    Don’t forget to Subscribe to the show, and Rate or Review wherever you tune in!
    Resources:
    The Psychophysiological Effects of Different Tempo Music on Endurance Versus High-Intensity Performances — Frontiers in Psychology
    Ergogenic and psychological effects of synchronous music during circuit-type exercise — Psychology of Sport and Exercise
    The effects of music tempo and loudness level on treadmill exercise — Ergonomics
    Can Listening to Music Improve Your Workout? — National Center for Health Research 
    Revisiting the exercise heart rate-music tempo preference relationship — Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
    Effect of different musical tempo on post-exercise recovery in young adults — Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
    Effects of self-selected music on maximal bench press strength and strength endurance — Perceptual and Motor Skills
    Effects of self-selected music on strength, explosiveness, and mood — Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 
    The effect of music during warm-up on consecutive anaerobic performance in elite adolescent volleyball players —  International Journal of Sports Medicine
    Music Mindset: Don’t Wait for Tomorrow — Born Fitness

    • 4 min
    Why Do People Think Lectins Are Toxic to Eat?

    Why Do People Think Lectins Are Toxic to Eat?

    Are you one of those people that think lectins — proteins that are found in many fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, beans, and legumes — are actually bad for you?
    Sadly, there’s probably one reason you might believe this misinformation, a book titled, The Plant Paradox, by Dr. Steven R. Gundry MD.
    In it, Gundry makes a wide variety of unsupported claims that many of the plants we consider to be healthy are actually bad for you.
    In fact, Gundry goes as far as to claim, “I believe lectins are the #1 Biggest Danger in the American Diet.”
    The #1 biggest danger is making a claim like that, especially when there is a significant lack of science to suggest anything so bold, and very little evidence to even be worried about lectins in the first place. 
    Lectins, as they are consumed in a diet, just aren’t an issue. And, unless you’re eating raw kidney beans (why are you eating raw kidney beans!) the alleged poisonous nature just isn’t realistic. 
    In other words: “Lectins are far more active in binding to our cells when they’re consumed in high concentrations and in isolation, as they are in experiments, than when they are consumed in food, as they generally are by actual humans,” notes Dr. David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center at Griffin Hospital and founder of the True Health Initiative.
    In this episode of That’s Healthy, Right?, we’ll look at the problem with taking anecdotal evidence as fact, how some of the healthiest populations in the world live off of lectin-heavy diets, and the only food you actually need to avoid eating (hint: you wouldn’t anyway).
    To ask a question, read the transcript, or learn more, visit bornfitness.com/thats-healthy-right.
    Don’t forget to Subscribe to the show, and Rate or Review wherever you tune in!
    Resources:
    Legume Lectins: Proteins with Diverse Applications — International Journal of Molecular Sciences
    Lectins as bioactive plant proteins: a potential in cancer treatment — Critical Review of Food Science Nutrition 
    Red kidney bean poisoning in the UK: an analysis of 50 suspected incidents between 1976 and 1989 — Epidemiology & Infection 
    Effect of Some Processing Methods on Hemagglutinin Activity of Lectin Extracts from Selected Grains (Cereals and Legumes) — International Journal of Advanced Academic Research
    Handbook of Foodborne Pathogenic Microorganisms and Natural Toxins — FDA
    Reduction in antinutritional and toxic components in plant foods by fermentation — Food Research International 
    Does Fruit Really Make You Fat? — That's Healthy, Right? Podcast  
    So Now Kale Is Bad for You? — Born Fitness

    • 5 min
    Is Activated Charcoal Actually Good for You?

    Is Activated Charcoal Actually Good for You?

    Is the detox of all detoxes really a detox that you want?
    This mouthful is exactly what you need to ponder when using activated charcoal. The compound — which is used in hospitals when people overdose on certain drugs — has risen to popularity. It became a hot nutritional fad in the LA restaurant scene a few years ago, and it’s picked up momentum ever since. 
    Some claim it’s the ultimate detox. Others say it will improve general health. And, even the beauty industry has joined in, as it’s commonly touted as an effective “teeth-whitener.”
    In this episode of That’s Healthy, Right?, we’ll look at the clinical uses of activated charcoal, the negative side effects of long-term use, and a study that proves all you’re doing for your teeth is brushing them with the stuff from the grill.
    To ask a question, read the transcript, or learn more, visit bornfitness.com/thats-healthy-right.
    Don’t forget to Subscribe to the show, and Rate or Review wherever you tune in!
    Resources:
    Is Activated Charcoal Healthy for You? — Born Fitness
    Activated charcoal for acute overdose: a reappraisal — British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
    Oral activated charcoal in the treatment of intoxications. Role of single and repeated doses — Medical Toxicology and Adverse Drug Experience
    Whitening toothpaste containing activated charcoal, blue covarine, hydrogen peroxide or microbeads: which one is the most effective? — Journal of Applied Oral Science
    Charcoal and charcoal-based dentifrices: A literature review — Journal of the American Dental Association 
    Position paper: Single-dose activated charcoal — Clinical Toxicology
    Activated Charcoal for Acute Poisoning: One Toxicologist’s Journey — Journal of Medical Toxicology 
    New York City Department Of Health Bans Black Foods That Contain Activated Charcoal
     — Tech Times
    The Hype Machine: Do Detoxes Really Work? — Born Fitness

    • 5 min
    Does the Celery Juice Craze Hold Water?

    Does the Celery Juice Craze Hold Water?

    According to a recent informal poll of our followers, we discovered that 64% of respondents believe celery juice has a higher nutritional value than many other healthy options out there.
    But, where does this belief come from? After all, we’re talking about celery. Not some exotic superfood that was just discovered. 
    And yet, the celery juice explosion is very real and worth discussing because any food that gives you a nutritional advantage is worth adding to your diet — if it really backs up its claims.
    There are many things about the human body that we still don’t understand, but a little sleuthing (and a good dose of science) can help us to see why the claims around this craze are a bust.
    In this episode of That’s Healthy, Right?, we’ll look at the progenitor of the celery juice craze, his spurious health claims, and the real reason you’re seeing health benefits from drinking it.
    To ask a question, read the transcript, or learn more, visit bornfitness.com/thats-healthy-right.
    Don’t forget to Subscribe to the show, and Rate or Review wherever you tune in!
    tl/dr: Does Celery Juice Really Work?
    If you’ve been following That’s Healthy, Right?, you know that we take tremendous pride in our in-depth, unbiased research. But, when it came to researching celery juice, we came away frustrated. Why? Because there is almost no published research that supports any of the claims that suggest celery juices works for many of the proposed health benefits. Celery juice has many antioxidants and it’s not bad, but it's no different than drinking many other vegetable or fruit juices. And, in many ways, eating raw celery is likely to have more nutritional value than juicing the celery. Sadly, the celery juice diet is a big myth with no scientific backing. 
    Resources:
    Experts Are Rolling Their Eyes At The Celery Juice Diet Craze — NY Post 
    Celery Juice: Are the Benefits Real? — UC Davis Health 
    Celery Juice Will Not Work Miracles, No Matter What You Read on Goop — The Washington Post 
    Detoxing is a Hoax — Vice 
    Your Juice Cleanse is Probably Doing More Harm Than Good — Vice 
    A Forensic Analysis of the Benefits of Lemon Water — That’s Healthy, Right?
    The Body Cleanse: Does Juicing Really Work? — Born Fitness

    • 5 min
    Does Fruit Really Make You Fat?

    Does Fruit Really Make You Fat?

    If sugar is bad, does that mean fruit needs to be avoided?
    It’s a question that has been asked thousands of times in hundreds of different ways. Because of the general fear of sugar, it’s assumed that fruit — which is, admittedly, filled with sugar — must be bad and more likely to contribute to making you gain weight (and become fat). 
    The concerns spill over to all your favorites: do you need to avoid bananas? What about apples and pears? Will peaches and watermelon ruin my summer body goals?
    The (very) short answer is fruit is badly misunderstood. As we’ve discussed before, not all sugar is equal, and any amount of sugar will not make you fat.
    Like so many things in health and nutrition, the obvious answer is rarely the correct one. When it comes to fruit, you have to look at the entire nutrient profile to understand why fruit has so many benefits that can offset the sugar and make it more of a weight loss aid than a weight gain food. 
    In this episode of That’s Healthy, Right?, we examine the real concerns with fruit, the fallacy of the relationship between fruit and weight gain, look at the research behind the benefits of eating fruit daily, the best time of day to eat fruit, and how much fruit is too much.
    To ask a question, read the transcript, or learn more, visit bornfitness.com/thats-healthy-right.
    Don’t forget to Subscribe to the show, and Rate or Review wherever you tune in!
    Resources:
    Paradoxical Effects of Fruit on Obesity — Nutrients 
    Impact of Whole, Fresh Fruit Consumption on Energy Intake and Adiposity: A Systematic Review — Frontiers in Nutrition 
    Effects of two energy-restricted diets containing different fruit amounts on body weight loss and macronutrient oxidation — Plant Foods Human Nutrition
    Health benefits of fruits and vegetables — Advanced Nutrition
    What can intervention studies tell us about the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and weight management? —  Nutrition Reviews
    Changes in diet and lifestyle and long-term weight gain in women and men — New England Journal of Medicine
    Effects of fruit consumption on body mass index and weight loss in a sample of overweight and obese dieters enrolled in a weight-loss intervention trial — Nutrition 
    A low-energy-dense diet adding fruit reduces weight and energy intake in women — Appetite
    Changes in intake of fruits and vegetables in relation to risk of obesity and weight gain among middle-aged women — International Journal of Obesity
    Appetite control: Methodological aspects of the evaluation of foods — Obesity
    So Now Kale Is Bad for You? — Born Fitness
    Effect of a very-high-fiber vegetable, fruit, and nut diet on serum lipids and colonic function — Metabolism 
    Effect of fruit restriction on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes--a randomized trial — Nutrition Journal 

    • 5 min
    Is Blue Light Harmful to Your Health?

    Is Blue Light Harmful to Your Health?

    The digital world has created one inevitability: we all spend a lot more time in front of screens, whether it’s your computer, phone, or tablet-like device. While you could argue the dangers and downsides of what it does to your attention span, there’s a more direct issue worthy of your attention — is all of the blue light from those screens bad for your health?
    In particular, does blue light damage your eyes, disrupt your sleep, or, possibly, something worse?
    There’s quite a bit of misunderstanding about the origins, utility, value, and danger that blue light poses, and this episode clears the confusion and demystifies the true dangers.
    In this episode of That’s Healthy, Right? we explain the benefits (yes, benefits) of blue light and its effects on the human body, the importance of your circadian rhythms and melatonin production, a warning about wearing blue light glasses, and the 20/20/20 rule for healthy vision.
    To ask a question, read the transcript, or learn more, visit bornfitness.com/thats-healthy-right.
    Don’t forget to Subscribe to the show, and Rate or Review wherever you tune in!
    Resources:
    Solving Sleep Problems: Non-obvious Solutions to Better Rest and Recovery — Born Fitness
    The effect of blue‐light blocking spectacle lenses on visual performance, macular health and the sleep‐wake cycle: a systematic review of the literature — OPO
    A double-blind test of blue-blocking filters on symptoms of digital eye strain — Work 
    Effects of Blue Light on the Circadian System and Eye Physiology — Molecular Vision 
    LED’s and Blue Light — ANSES
    Research progress about the effect and prevention of blue light on eyes — International Journal of Ophthalmology 
    The Sun, UV lights, and your eyes — American Academy of Ophthalmology 
    Blue Light From Light-Emitting Diodes Elicits a Dose-Dependent Suppression of Melatonin in Humans — Journal of Applied Physiology 
    Effects of the Emitted Light Spectrum of Liquid Crystal Displays on Light-Induced Retinal Photoreceptor Cell Damage — International Journal of Molecular Sciences 
    Cones Support Alignment to an Inconsistent World by Suppressing Mouse Circadian Responses to the Blue Colors Associated with Twilight — Current Biology 
    Bigger, Brighter, Bluer-Better? Current light-emitting devices – adverse sleep properties and preventative strategies — Public Health

    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
42 Ratings

42 Ratings

R E Bricker ,

A little dose of common and uncommon sense

I love these bite size nuggets of wisdom. I learn something new every time. In a world of
noise, these nuggets have some simple harmony and rhythm common sense applied with actual science, leaving behind the trend hype.

Hshane5109 ,

Short and to the point

I love this podcast. It is short, it gets to the point, and is very informational. It answers a lot of questions I didn’t even know I had. Do yourself a favor, and give it a listen.

Corp.Athlete ,

Short, to the point and no agenda

Super unique podcast. Great for the person who wants to cut through the chit chat, and get solid information from someone who knows, researches and has no agenda. Thanks Adam!

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