119 episodes

LATEST SERIES: Thea (T Episodes) - tracing the disintegration of the Seleucid Empire

PREVIOUS SERIES:

The Ancient World - from the earliest human civilizations down through 500 BC

Rediscovery (R Episodes) - the stories of the modern scholars and adventurers who rediscovered the ancient world

Bloodline (B Episodes) - tracing the descendants of Mark Antony and Cleopatra over ten generations

The Ancient World Scott C.

    • History

LATEST SERIES: Thea (T Episodes) - tracing the disintegration of the Seleucid Empire

PREVIOUS SERIES:

The Ancient World - from the earliest human civilizations down through 500 BC

Rediscovery (R Episodes) - the stories of the modern scholars and adventurers who rediscovered the ancient world

Bloodline (B Episodes) - tracing the descendants of Mark Antony and Cleopatra over ten generations

    Episode T15 – Grypus

    Episode T15 – Grypus

    Synopsis: Cleopatra Thea convinces her son Antiochus VIII Grypus to return to Syria and share the throne.  But once Zabinas is defeated and the kingdom secure, Grypus decides to avenge his brother’s murder.







    “Ptolemy (Physcon)…proceeded to devote his entire strength to the destruction of Alexander (Zabinas’) kingdom, which the latter had acquired by Ptolemy’s resources solely because of his hatred for Demetrius (II).  He therefore sent assistance to Grypus on a massive scale and also gave him the hand of his daughter, Tryphaena, in marriage.”  – Justin, Epitome of the Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus, Book 39







    “After recovering his father’s throne and being freed from threats from abroad, Grypus became the target of his mother’s treachery.  Through her lust for power she had already betrayed her husband, Demetrius, and killed her other son; now she took it ill that her prestige was diminished by Grypus’ victory, and so she set before him a cup of poison.”  – Justin, Epitome of the Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus, Book 39

    • 27 min
    Episode T14 – Zabinas

    Episode T14 – Zabinas

    Synopsis: Demetrius II returns to Syria, but his unpopularity – and support for the Egyptian Queen Cleopatra II – results in a usurper named Alexander Zabinas taking most of his kingdom.  Fleeing a military defeat, Demetrius is denied entry to Ptolemais-Akko by Cleopatra Thea, an act that leads to his death.  The elevation of their son Seleucus V results in a darker tragedy.





    “Released from confinement among the Parthians and restored to his throne, Antiochus’ brother Demetrius (II) decided to make war on Egypt…For his mother-in-law, Cleopatra (II), promised him the throne of Egypt as the reward for his assistance against her brother.” – Justin, Epitome of the Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus, Book 39.





    “Demetrius (II), for his part, was defeated by Alexander (Zabinas) and, with misfortune besetting him on all sides, he was finally abandoned even by his wife and children. Left with a few slaves, he made for Tyre, intending to use the sanctity of the temple to protect himself; but as he disembarked from this ship he was killed on the orders of the governor.” – Justin, Epitome of the Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus, Book 39.

    • 30 min
    Episode T13 – Eunus

    Episode T13 – Eunus

    Synopsis: A Syrian man from Apamea, enslaved on the island of Sicily, renames himself King Antiochus and launches the first large-scale slave rebellion against the Roman Republic.

     

    “The Sicilians, through the enjoyment of a long peace, grew very rich, and brought up an abundance of slaves; who being driven in droves like so many herds of cattle from the different places where they were bred and brought up, were branded with certain marks burned on their bodies….their masters were very strict and severe with them, and took no care to provide either necessary food or clothing for them, so that most of them were forced to rob and steal to get these necessities; so that all places were full of slaughters and murders.” – Diodorus Siculus, The Historical Library, Book 34

     

    “Then they made Eunus king, not for his valor or skill in warfare, but on account of his extraordinary tricks, and because he was made the leader and author of the defection…At length, putting a diadem upon his head and graced with all the emblems of royalty, he caused his wife, who was also a Syrian from the same city, to be called queen, and chose such as he judged to be the most prudent to be his councillors.” – Diodorus Siculus, The Historical Library, Book 34

     

    • 30 min
    Episode T12 – Sar Matati

    Episode T12 – Sar Matati

    Synopsis: After Mithridates is struck down by an illness, his son Phraates II defends Parthian gains against the army of Antiochus VII.  Forced to retreat to Hyrcania, Phraates sets events in motion that result in the deaths of both kings.





    “On Antiochus (VII)’s approach, many eastern princes came to meet him, surrendering their persons and their thrones, with curses of the arrogance of the Parthians.  The first encounter took place forthwith.  Victorious in three battles, Antiochus seized Babylon and began to be dubbed ‘the Great.’  Thus, as all the peoples were defecting to him, the Parthians were left with nothing but the lands of their fathers.” – Justin, Epitome of the Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus, Book 38





    “When word of (a revolt) came to Antiochus (VII), he advanced with the contingent which was wintering with him in order to assist those who were closest at hand, only to meet while on the march the king of the Parthians, against whom he put up a braver fight than did his forces.  Finally, however, the enemy’s valor prevailed and Antiochus, deserted by his craven troops, was killed.” – Justin, Epitome of the Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus, Book 38





    “Let’s sit on the ground and tell sad stories of the death of kings, how some were overthrown and others killed in war.  Some were haunted by the ghosts of the kings they had overthrown.” – Shakespeare, Richard II: Act 3 Scene 2





    Map of the Parthian Empire c. 96 BC, which is fairly similar to what they held under Mithridates I c. 138 BC:





    http://s407341505.onlinehome.us/Parthia96BC.jpeg

    • 32 min
    Episode T11 – Euergetes

    Episode T11 – Euergetes

    Synopsis: Ongoing strife in Anatolia and Egypt allows Antiochus VII to campaign east against the Parthians.  His early successes inspire hopes of a resurgent Seleucid Empire, hopes shattered by his unexpected death.





    “In Asia, Attalos III as soon as he came to the throne began to manage affairs in a way quite different from all the former kings; for they, by their clemency and kindness to their subjects, reigned prosperously and happily themselves and were a blessing to the kingdom; but this prince being of a cruel and bloody disposition oppressed his subjects with many slaughters and grievous calamities.” – Diodorus Siculus, The Historical Library, Book 35





    “Ptolemy Physcon, when he saw that his sister Cleopatra (II) was so great an enemy to him, and could not revenge himself otherwise upon her, contrived a most abominable piece of villainy for that purpose.  For, imitating the cruelty of Medeia, he murdered her son, begotten by himself, in Cyprus; the son was called Memphites, and was still a young boy.” – Diodorus Siculus, The Historical Library, Book 35





    “(Queen) Laodice (of Cappadocia) had had six children of the male sex by King Ariarathes (V); she feared that she would not long remain in control of the kingdom once any of them grew up, so she resorted to murder, killing five of them by poison.” – Justin, Epitome of the Philippic History of Pompeius Trogus, Book 37





    Map of Anatolia after the Treaty of Apamea (c. 188 BC):

    http://s407341505.onlinehome.us/Anatolia.jpg

    • 32 min
    Episode S2 – The Bactrian Kingdom

    Episode S2 – The Bactrian Kingdom

    “In this battle, Antiochus’ horse was wounded and killed, and the king himself was struck through the mouth and lost some of his teeth.  On the whole, he acquired on that occasion the greatest reputation for valor.  Because of this battle, Euthydemus was caught off guard and retreated with his forces into the Bactrian city of Zariaspa.” – Polybius, The Histories, 10.49

     

    Synopsis: After the death of Alexander the Great, Bactria came under Seleucid rule before gaining its independence under the Diodotid and Euthydemid kings.  In the second part of my interview with historian and author Tristan Hughes, we discuss how the Bactrian Kingdom was born, preserved itself against multiple attempts at Seleucid reconquest, and finally met its end. 

     

    Tristan Hughes @BattlesAncients on Twitter

     

    Battles of the Ancients website www.turningpointsoftheancientworld.com

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

raulrey0 ,

The ancient world rocks!!

Very well researched and so so so funny!!! Bloodlines series on Romans in Judea is world class. Until aprox the 18th century Josephus’ “The Jewish War” was the second most read book after the Bible in many areas of Christendom. It’s a rare firsthand record informing our picture of the rise and reception of Christianity, an absolutely fascinating story, and one of the most challenging events to teach. To get a flavor for the drama I can’t say enough about the brilliant storytelling of Scott the host of this podcast!

the objective reviewer ,

Overall history of the world

Well done

greeneyed28 ,

Great podcast!

I’m loving this.

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