4 episodes

The Dyson Distinguished Lecture was endowed in 1982 by a gift from the Dyson Foundation made possible through the generosity of the late Charles H. Dyson, a 1930 graduate, trustee, and long-time benefactor of Pace University. The principal aim and object of the Dyson Distinguished Lecture is to encourage and make possible scholarly legal contributions of very high quality in furtherance of Pace Law School's educational mission.

Charles H. Dyson was born August 2, 1909, and died at the age of 87 on March 14, 1997. He was well known as a financier, entrepreneur, and philanthropist. He was considered a pioneer in the field of leveraged buyouts and was best known for his government service. After graduating from Pace Institute in 1930, he began a career in public accounting. Dr. Dyson was a lifelong Democrat who worked for President Franklin D. Roosevelt and served in World War II. In 1954, he founded the Dyson-Kissner-Moran Corporation, a New York investment company that has become one of the nation's largest privately held corporations. Pace University's Dyson College of Arts and Sciences is also named in his honor.

The Annual Charles H. Dyson Distinguished Lecture Pace University

    • News

The Dyson Distinguished Lecture was endowed in 1982 by a gift from the Dyson Foundation made possible through the generosity of the late Charles H. Dyson, a 1930 graduate, trustee, and long-time benefactor of Pace University. The principal aim and object of the Dyson Distinguished Lecture is to encourage and make possible scholarly legal contributions of very high quality in furtherance of Pace Law School's educational mission.

Charles H. Dyson was born August 2, 1909, and died at the age of 87 on March 14, 1997. He was well known as a financier, entrepreneur, and philanthropist. He was considered a pioneer in the field of leveraged buyouts and was best known for his government service. After graduating from Pace Institute in 1930, he began a career in public accounting. Dr. Dyson was a lifelong Democrat who worked for President Franklin D. Roosevelt and served in World War II. In 1954, he founded the Dyson-Kissner-Moran Corporation, a New York investment company that has become one of the nation's largest privately held corporations. Pace University's Dyson College of Arts and Sciences is also named in his honor.

    • video
    The Nonhuman Rights Project's Struggle for Nonhuman Personhood

    The Nonhuman Rights Project's Struggle for Nonhuman Personhood

    Steven M. Wise has taught "Animal Rights Law" or "Animal Rights Jurisprudence" at the Harvard, Lewis and Clark, Vermont, University of Miami, St. Thomas, and John Marshall Law Schools. He has written Rattling the Cage - Toward Legal Rights for Animals, Drawing the Line - Science and the Case for Animal Rights, Though the Heavens May Fall - The Landmark Trial That Led to the End of Human Slavery, and An American Trilogy - Death, Slavery, & Dominion on the Banks of he Cape Fear River, and numerous law review articles. He directs the Nonhuman Rights Project, comprised of dozens of intelligent committed volunteers, including lawyers, law students, social scientists, natural scientists, mathematicians, film makers, and media experts, dedicated to persuading state high courts that a nonhuman animal should be declared a common law person. He regularly lectures throughout the world on animal rights jurisprudence.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    • video
    Fouling Our Nest: Is An (Environmental) Ethic Impotent Against (Bad) Economics

    Fouling Our Nest: Is An (Environmental) Ethic Impotent Against (Bad) Economics

    What is the moral nature of nature's capital? How do market failures contribute to the degradation of the environment? Why is there no comprehensive ethical and philosophical account of why environmental damage and destruction is immoral? This lecture will explore the problem posed by the very field of environmental ethics and reveal the philosophical conflict that undergirds our moral ambivalence towards nature and the environment. Professor Heidi M. Hurd serves as the David C. Baum Professor of Law and Professor of Philosophy at the University of Illinois.

    • 52 min
    • video
    Can Prisons Make Us Safer?: Restorative Justice and Criminal Justice Reform

    Can Prisons Make Us Safer?: Restorative Justice and Criminal Justice Reform

    • 1 hr 2 min
    • video
    The United States Secretary of Homeland Security

    The United States Secretary of Homeland Security

    • 53 min

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