23 min

The Anthropocene epoch that isn't The Conversation Weekly

    • News Commentary

For almost 15 years, scientists have debated whether the Anthropocene should be an official geological epoch marking the profound influence of humans on the planet. Then in March, an international panel of scientists formally rejected the proposal for a new Anthropocene epoch.
In this episode, two scientists give us their different opinions on whether that was the right decision and what it means for the future use of the word Anthropocene. 
Featuring Jan Zalasiewicz, professor of palaeobiology at the University of Leicester in the UK, and Erle C. Ellis, professor of geography and environmental systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in the US. Plus an introduction from Will de Freitas, environment and energy editor at The Conversation in the UK.
This episode was written and produced by Tiffany Cassidy with assistance from Katie Flood. Eloise Stevens does our sound design, and our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. Gemma Ware is the executive producer. Full credits available here. A transcript will be available shortly. Subscribe to a free daily newsletter from The Conversation.
Further reading
The Anthropocene is not an epoch − but the age of humans is most definitely underwayWhat the Anthropocene’s critics overlook – and why it really should be a new geological epochAnthropocene or not, it is our current epoch that we should be fighting forThe Anthropocene already exists in our heads, even if it’s now officially not a geological epoch


Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

For almost 15 years, scientists have debated whether the Anthropocene should be an official geological epoch marking the profound influence of humans on the planet. Then in March, an international panel of scientists formally rejected the proposal for a new Anthropocene epoch.
In this episode, two scientists give us their different opinions on whether that was the right decision and what it means for the future use of the word Anthropocene. 
Featuring Jan Zalasiewicz, professor of palaeobiology at the University of Leicester in the UK, and Erle C. Ellis, professor of geography and environmental systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County in the US. Plus an introduction from Will de Freitas, environment and energy editor at The Conversation in the UK.
This episode was written and produced by Tiffany Cassidy with assistance from Katie Flood. Eloise Stevens does our sound design, and our theme music is by Neeta Sarl. Gemma Ware is the executive producer. Full credits available here. A transcript will be available shortly. Subscribe to a free daily newsletter from The Conversation.
Further reading
The Anthropocene is not an epoch − but the age of humans is most definitely underwayWhat the Anthropocene’s critics overlook – and why it really should be a new geological epochAnthropocene or not, it is our current epoch that we should be fighting forThe Anthropocene already exists in our heads, even if it’s now officially not a geological epoch


Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

23 min

More by The Conversation

The Conversation Weekly
The Conversation
Don’t Call Me Resilient
The Conversation, Vinita Srivastava, Dannielle Piper, Krish Dineshkumar, Jennifer Moroz, Rehmatullah Sheikh, Kikachi Memeh, Ateqah Khaki, Scott White
The Anthill
The Conversation
Politics with Michelle Grattan
The Conversation
In Depth, Out Loud
The Conversation
Trust Me, I'm An Expert
The Conversation