44 episodes

The Art of Leadership with Niña Ellison focuses on the soft skills of leadership, their value and the power of their influence. As a leader, if you are interested in moving from success to significance then balancing both hard and soft skills is essential!

Hard skills are demonstrated through technical expertise that results in clearly measured goals being reached. They are vital to the success of any initiative or program. On the other hand, soft skills emphasize the transformation of people more than the transaction of tasks. They highlight behavioral changes and making a difference in people’s lives.

This podcast is for leaders who are seeking a fresh perspective into some of the hardest soft skills a leader will ever learn. You can connect with Niña at https://www.healthyleadership.online

The Art of Leadership Dr. Niña Ellison

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

The Art of Leadership with Niña Ellison focuses on the soft skills of leadership, their value and the power of their influence. As a leader, if you are interested in moving from success to significance then balancing both hard and soft skills is essential!

Hard skills are demonstrated through technical expertise that results in clearly measured goals being reached. They are vital to the success of any initiative or program. On the other hand, soft skills emphasize the transformation of people more than the transaction of tasks. They highlight behavioral changes and making a difference in people’s lives.

This podcast is for leaders who are seeking a fresh perspective into some of the hardest soft skills a leader will ever learn. You can connect with Niña at https://www.healthyleadership.online

    Leaders are Learners

    Leaders are Learners

    Leaders are learners
    There is more than meets the eye when seeking to add value to others
    In every profession, our values impact our decision making as leaders.
    The values you and I as leaders embrace create structure and meaning in our work.
    Putting your values first impacts your decision making in a way that enables you to gain a consistency in your leadership no matter the circumstance.
    How willing we are to understand others and what they value…. what matters to them.
    Being a leader is not as much about me as it is understanding and empowering those I lead.
    Going deeper leaders learn that adding value is even more than strategy or process. It is certainly more than the idea of clicking on a radio button in your mind that you are adding value.
    One of the challenges for you and for me as we seek growth as leaders who add value to others is the continual pursuit of the awareness of our assumptions.
    At times this kind of critical thinking can be a solo activity, but I believe it must be balanced with experiences such as Round Tables where new ideas, new concepts, a heightened awareness of what we value becomes evident and lends authority to our decision making as leaders.
    As always, you can reach me at http://www.healthyleadership.online/ (www.healthyleadership.online).
    Resources:
    Maxwell, J and Hoskins, R. (2021) Change Your World. Harper Collins: USA. p.107-129.
    https://www.changeyourworld.com/en/landing (https://www.changeyourworld.com/en/landing)
    https://www.airuniversity.af.edu/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=y4oFCKRrMKI%3Dandportalid=10 (The RED model of critical thinking )

    • 9 min
    Leaders Captivated by courage

    Leaders Captivated by courage

    Leaders Captivated by courage
    Personal insights into a leader’s 46 year journey of courage
    Deeper insights on courage from a successful leader with 46 years of experience:
    1. Stand up for yourself
    2. Summon your inner strength; who you are
    3. Recognize what is important to you
    4. Push through your fear; use positive self-talk
    5. Share from an “I” perspective and let your voice be heard
    6. Where the mind goes the body follows
    7. Do what you know you need to do
    8. Courage frees you up to be you
    9. Preparation makes the difference
    10. Be ready to know and share the “WHY”
    Connect with me at http://www.healthyleadership.online/ (www.healthyleadership.online)

    • 15 min
    Adaptability is a key soft skill for virtual leaders

    Adaptability is a key soft skill for virtual leaders

    Adaptability is a key soft skill for virtual leaders
    Adaptability empowers a virtual leader to thrive within a rapid change environment
    Speaking broadly, adaptability in a leader is seen when learning new skills to change the course of their choices and their actions in response to circumstances that are in a rapid change pattern.
    The cycle looks like this:
    Rapid change → Recognized need for new skill development → Different choices are needed → Different actions must be pursued → the next phase of rapid change
    Three things to consider with seeking the evidence of adaptability in a leader:
    1. Being grounded so you can soar
    2. A willingness to shift thoughts and ideas that result in relevant actions for times of rapid change
    3. Focusing on an energy that moves the work from transaction (getting tasks done) to transformation (discovering what really matters and then unleashing actions that make a difference)
    Adaptability empowers a virtual leader to thrive within a rapid change environment!
    Three things that are missing if virtual leaders are not demonstrating adaptability.
    1. Continued reference to the existing way of doing things.
    2. A lack of inclusion in new partnerships
    3. Confusion and uncertainty on changing priorities.
    Virtual leadership for many is a new normal that will fundamentally change the lives for many of today’s leaders. If you are, or work with, virtual leaders, let me encourage you to affirm what grounds you and they determine the willingness to adapt to the value found in a new normal.
    “You cannot be the same, think the same, and act the same if you hope to be successful in a world that does not remain the same.” John Maxwell, international leadership expert.
    Maxwell, J. (2019). Leadershift: the 11 essential changes every leader must embrace. USA: Harper Collins, p. 7
    My name is Niña Ellison, Leadership Consultant and coach. You can reach me at http://www.healthyleadership.online/ (www.healthyleadership.online).
    Going forward you will see a new format to this podcast, The Art of Leadership, as I am shifting to publishing a podcast monthly. I look forward to connecting with you virtually at the end of March!

    • 10 min
    The Art of Saying No

    The Art of Saying No

    The Art of Saying No
    Saying Yes is Always Easy But Not Always Wise
    https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/114376-the-art-of-leadership-is-saying-no-not-yes-it (“The art of leadership is saying no, not yes. It is very easy to say yes.” Tony Blair)
    Consider What happens when you always say yes.
    1. It’s impossible to do everything well and saying yes to everything puts a leader at high risk for losing the focus and the stamina to accomplish their highest priorities.
    2. When a leader always says yes, they move into the tyranny of the urgent, putting out fires and tackling the day-to-day demands. All good and important things but not where their highest impact and value will be felt – good, but not great things.
    “Greatness is not a function of circumstance. Greatness, it turns out, is largely a matter of conscious choice, and discipline.” Jim Collins
    “Good is the enemy of great. And that is one of the key reasons why we have so little that becomes great.” Jim Collins
    3. When a leader always says yes, is that it may skew a leader’s motives for why they are willing to do the work. Are they are saying yes because they like to feel good? Feel that they are a supportive team player? Have a strong desire to be liked? Or are they saying yes in the hopes it will set them up for a promotion? Are they saying yes so that the conversation will take less of their time as they respond with a quick yes?
    Being bold enough to say no is not always easy. You still want to be perceived as a team player, as someone who wants to work hard, as one who understands the needs of the business; as a leader who can flex when needed…. And I could go on…
    When someone comes to you with a request, if at all possible, rather than jumping in with a response, look to share in an open and responsive way with comments such as:
    Can we set up some time to talk about this? Can I have a little time to learn more about this?
    From my own experience I have found that before I quickly say yes to a request the results are usually better if I have time to ask myself a few questions:
    Can I seek to understand why this request is being made?
    Step One: Clarify
    Step Two: Reflect
    Step Three: Confirm
    Is this request the wise thing to do?
    Exploration of wisdom is an essential component in every leader’s journey and, particularly as you consider the idea that there are times to say “No” then it’s great to have wisdom at your side.
    To me, this moves the question from whether doing the task is right or wrong, but is it the best choice.
    Jim Temme’s method in his book called Productivity Power uses the acronym USA to help a leader develop an approach to saying no.
    U: Begin with an understanding statement. Really this is about acknowledging the value of the person who is coming to ask you to support some work. Secondly it is an opportunity to show that you understand the work is important.
    S: Situation Statement. This takes into account what your situation is right now. Being organized in a way that demonstrates your work load really helps communicate clearly what your current situation is.
    A: Action Statement: You have the chance to move this request into action. Instead of starting with no or other words of frustration, engage in a conversation of options for action. Moving other priorities, including someone else in the request and so on….
    Notice that the action statement is asking your boss to help with the solution. This is so different than the only option being that you respond with a yes. This is also a good reminder that in saying no to this request you are still saying yes to the highest priorities.
    Gain a clear picture of your situation and your days. Determine what you value the most, what your top priorities are. And then enter into the art of learning to say no. (oh, by the way, this is not just for managing work in your busi

    • 11 min
    Black History Month can shift a leader’s perspective

    Black History Month can shift a leader’s perspective

    Black History Month can shift a leader’s perspective

    Intentional Soft Skill development in the celebration of Black History Month
    The month of February is Black History Month in the USA. This focused celebration of the achievements and history of African Americans is Also recognized in Canada, Ireland, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Germany.
    In the US, the idea that was birthed by historian and Harvard graduate Carter G. Woodson in 1915 was to strive for a balanced history, encourage better relations between Black and White people in the United States as well as inspire young Black Americans to celebrate the accomplishments and contributions of their ancestors.
    History is made by people! By you and me. Celebrating history opens the door from macro to micro possibilities for growth and development. This podcast looks at the micro potential for soft skill development though a deeper understanding of history.
    Three questions a leader can ask when seeking to develop soft skills as they celebrate Black History Month:1. Who am I leaving out?2. What am I hoping for?3. How am I influencing the next generation of leaders?
    Six soft skills to seek to develop during this month:Interpersonal relationships, a willingness to learn, Humility, Inclusiveness, creativity, and Thinking outside of the box - beyond expectations
    I am Niña Ellison and you can find me at http://www.healthyleadership.online/ (www.healthyleadership.online)

    Resources:Verna Myers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qTfX4U6C_0 (You can help stop the violence against young black men )

    • 12 min
    Millennials leading Millennials and making a difference

    Millennials leading Millennials and making a difference

    Millennials leading Millennials and making a difference
    In the https://www2.deloitte.com/global/en/pages/about-deloitte/articles/millennialsurvey.html (The Deloitte Global Millennial Survey 2020) we see that in 2016 76% of millennials saw business, in general, as a force for good.
    In December 2019, this number went down as 51% of millennials saw business, in general, as a force for good
    In May 2020, as the COVID-19 health pandemic spread around the world, only 41% of Millennials agreed that business was having a positive impact on wider society.
    If I were to stop there with the results shared on the 2020 Deloitte Global Millennial survey this would be such a gloomy picture.
    However, as the survey shared, at the individual employer’ level, reputations fared better: Millennials (ages 24-39) gave their employers high marks for their pandemic responses and, for the first time in four years, more Millennials said they want to stay with their employers for five or more years rather than leave within 2 years This is unprecedented since the question was first asked in 2016.
    Millennials also said that companies are doing more to align with their interests, including
    · and supporting career development through training and mentorship
    · creating diverse and inclusive work environments
    · making a positive impact on local communities.
    Listen to 2 millennial leaders as they share the systems and process that are working for them as they seek to build a reputation and a culture that moves them forward in working with their peers.
    Would you like to grow in this area of your leadership. Set up a call with me at http://www.healthyleadership.online/ (www.healthyleadership.online) – let’s chat about how I can partner with you.

    • 16 min

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