44 episodes

"The Art of Medicine" explores the arts, business and clinical aspects of the practice of medicine. Guests range from a CPA who specializes in helping locum tenens physicians file their taxes to a Rabbi who shares secrets about spiritual healing.

The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner Andrew Wilner, MD

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

"The Art of Medicine" explores the arts, business and clinical aspects of the practice of medicine. Guests range from a CPA who specializes in helping locum tenens physicians file their taxes to a Rabbi who shares secrets about spiritual healing.

    The Art of Medicine, Episode #43, Advanced Practice Clinicians in Neurology

    The Art of Medicine, Episode #43, Advanced Practice Clinicians in Neurology

    Show Notes
    July 9, 2021
    Many thanks to Rhonda Finnie, DNP, APRN (and a lot of other acronyms due to her many certifications!) for joining me today to examine the role of nurse practitioners and other nonphysician providers in the health care team.
    We discussed the recent article published in JAMA Neurology by Calli Cook, DNP, and Heidi Schwarz, MD, that called attention to the role of advanced practice clinicians (APCs) in neurology (1). Rhonda’s clinical focus for more than 15 years has been neurology and neurosurgery. Currently, she works as a nurse with a 5-member neurosurgical group where she evaluates and cares for patients in the emergency room and intensive care unit. Her clinical activities allow the neurosurgeons to spend more time in the operating room employing their unique skills

    Advanced practice clinicians are a growing part of the healthcare workforce. For example, of the 36,000 members of the American Academy of Neurology, more than 1,600 are APCs. How these providers integrate into patient care with respect to autonomy and scope of practice is very much a work in progress. The inclusion of “midlevels” has not been without its growing pains. Rhonda clarified how the addition of APCs to the healthcare team can benefit patients.
     Rhonda explained that postgraduate education such as specialty boards can help APCs prepare for roles in neurology. Mastering the neurologic clinical examination is another key to success. 
    Physicians and organizations that employ APCs need to have appropriate expectations. Rhonda emphasized that APCs are “not there to replace the physician.” Physicians shouldn’t feel threatened by the integration of APCs into the healthcare team.
    Please enjoy this 20-minute interview. Your feedback is always welcome.

    PS: Now available on Alexa! Just ask, "Play podcast The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner!" 
    References
    Cook CL, Schwarz HB. Advanced Practice Clinicians-Neurology’s Underused Resource, JAMA Neurology, May 24, 2021, doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2021.1416.
     
    For more fascinating interviews, please subscribe to “The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner.” www.youtube.com/c/andrewwilnermdauthor
     
    www.andrewwilner.com
     
    #advancedpracticeclinicians, #midlevels, #AAN, #nursepractitioner, #APCs, #RN, #providers,
    #locums #locumphysicians
     

    • 18 min
    The Art of Medicine, Episode #42, Asset Protection: Who Needs It? An interview with Brian Bradley, Esq.

    The Art of Medicine, Episode #42, Asset Protection: Who Needs It? An interview with Brian Bradley, Esq.

    Show Notes
    July 9, 2021

    Many thanks to Brian Bradley, Esq., for discussing the topic of asset protection during this 20-miunute podcast. Brian is an asset protection attorney with Bradley Legal Corp.

    The more assets one has, the more critical asset protection becomes. However, asset protection plans may be advisable even for those without private jets and multiple residences. Brian advised that anyone who invests in something beyond their personal residence should consider asset protection. For example, owning a single rental property may warrant a Limited Liability Company (LLC) or other strategies. According to Brian, real estate is a “very risky asset” because you become a landlord with tenants. Other assets, including “anything that needs a key that has a motor,” such as an airplane, boat, or recreational vehicle, requires inclusion in an asset protection plan.

    Brian explained that “asset protection” goes beyond insurance policies and estate planning. Asset protection is crucial because it places an additional legal barrier between assets and a potential creditor. As the stakes get higher, security can be layered. An asset protection trust may be advisable for high-net-worth individuals.

    Brian also explored whether malpractice insurance provides sufficient protection for most physicians. This depends upon the type of medical practice as well as personal risk tolerance.

    To learn more about malpractice, check out Chapters 11 and 12 of my book, “The Locum Life: A Physician’s Guide to Locum Tenens,” available on Amazon and through my website: www.andrewwilner.com

    If you have assets to protect, it’s important to develop a continuing relationship with an attorney specializing in asset protection. A directory of asset protection attorneys is available at www.assetprotectioncouncil.com.

    Brian Bradley can be contacted at: www.btblegal.com

    For more fascinating interviews, please subscribe to “The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner.” www.youtube.com/c/andrewwilnermdauthor

    www.andrewwilner.com

    #risktolerance #malpractice #assetprotection #assetprotectionattorney #liability #LLC #realestate #realestateinvestment
    SHOW LESS

    • 19 min
    The Art of Medicine, Episode #41, Medspa vs. Dayspa, in interview with Leighann Landy, FNP-C

    The Art of Medicine, Episode #41, Medspa vs. Dayspa, in interview with Leighann Landy, FNP-C

    Show Notes
    July 9, 2021
    Many thanks to Leighann Landy, FNP-C, for sharing her experience as a co-owner of a Medspa with her husband, Stephen Landy, MD. If you listen to “The Art of Medicine” regularly, you will remember that Dr. Landy and I had a great talk about migraines in Episode #32.
    Leighann explained the difference between a Medspa and Dayspa.  Botox, fillers, and lasers are popular Medspa treatments that require medical training to limit complications. Dark spots, telangiectasias, and wrinkles are all susceptible to amelioration. Leighann observed that the type of treatments available varies depending upon the individual Medspa.
    Leighann emphasized that prospective patients should check the staff’s medical credentials when selecting a Medspa. They must also have realistic expectations regarding the expected results. 
    Before treatment begins, Leighann consults with each patient and discusses possible interventions and costs. Clients need to know that some procedures, like eliminating dark spots, may require more than one visit. Other treatments, like removing wrinkles with Botox, can be completed in one visit but wear off and need to be performed periodically. In some instances, Medspa techniques offer an alternative to more definitive surgery.
    To reach Leighann for a consultation, visit Landy Headache and Esthetics, 311 S. Gloster Street, Tupelo, MS: https://landyhe.com/
    Thanks for listening!
     
    #Medspa #Dayspa #esthetics #laser #filler #migraine #Botox #bodyimage
    For more fascinating episodes, please subscribe to “The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner.” www.youtube.com/c/andrewwilnermdauthor
    www.andrewwilner.com
     
     
     
     
     

    • 17 min
    The Art of Medicine, Episode #40, Locum Tenens and ER Medicine, an interview with Ripal Patel, MD

    The Art of Medicine, Episode #40, Locum Tenens and ER Medicine, an interview with Ripal Patel, MD

    Show Notes
    July 7, 2021
    Many thanks to Ripal Patel, MD, founder and lead for Mercision Emergency Medicine, for joining me to discuss locum tenens and ER medicine. Dr. Patel received his MD at UT Southwestern Medical Center and his MPH at Kings College, London. He started in general surgery but quickly found his home in ER medicine. After an ER residency at Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, Philadelphia, PA, he moved to Houston, TX, where he is an Assistant Professor at the Baylor College of Medicine. 
    As a locum tenens ER physician, Dr. Patel has traveled to as many as 30 different ERs in a half-dozen states. He works with staffing agencies and also has his own group of ER physicians who contract directly with hospitals. During this 20-minute interview, Rip shares his experiences, both good and bad, with the world of locums.
    Dr. Patel explained that locums physicians work on their own schedule, receive excellent compensation, and avoid hospital politics. Assignments are time-limited. If they don’t work out, there’s no obligation to return. On the other hand, if it’s a good experience, recurring assignments offer many advantages.
    If you are a physician unhappy with your current employment, need supplemental income, or just ready to try something new, this interview will interest you. Dr. Patel advises that physicians disillusioned with clinical medicine consider locums before switching to a nonclinical career. 
    Dr. Patel can be contacted through his website: www.mercisionem.com
    For more fascinating interviews, please subscribe to “The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner.”
    www.youtube.com/c/andrewwilnermdauthor
    If you have questions about locums, don't hesitate to get in touch with me: www.andrewwilner.com


    #ER #ermedicine #locums #locumtenens #travel #locumsphysician #roadwarrior #1099 #sidegig #nonclinicalcareers

    • 23 min
    The Art of Medicine, Episode #39, Stop the Bleed, an interview with Pamela Finnie, RN

    The Art of Medicine, Episode #39, Stop the Bleed, an interview with Pamela Finnie, RN

    Show Notes
    July 7, 2021
    Please join me for this 20-minute program with Pamela Finnie, RN, Trauma Program Manager at Regional One Health, Memphis, TN. We discussed the role of a regional trauma center and an important public health program, "Stop the Bleed."
    Pamela explains what trauma is and the need for immediate specialized care. As a Level 1 Trauma Center, Regional One Health accepts patients from a 150-mile radius. These include motor vehicle accidents, gunshot wounds, falls, burns, and other bodily injuries. Ground and air ambulances arrive at the hospital regularly. The trauma team treats as many as 40 patients each day, every day of the year.
    Pamela is a local ambassador for the "Stop the Bleed" campaign, which teaches first aid for gunshot wounds and other injuries that result in bleeding. She explained that the American College of Surgeons spearheaded "Stop the Bleed" after studies of mass shootings revealed that bystanders could have saved lives if only they knew how. For example, law enforcement officers prioritize neutralizing the threat in a mass shooting rather than assisting injured victims. An uninjured bystander's simple application of pressure or tourniquet could decrease bleeding sufficiently until emergency medical services arrive.
    The "Stop the Bleed" program recommends three steps:
    1.     Before helping others, first make sure you are safe.
    2.     Call 911, 
    3.     Apply pressure to the wound or a tourniquet 
    "Stop the Bleed" educational programs are free of charge. To locate one in your area, contact stopthebleed.org.
    For local programs, don't hesitate to get in touch with Pamela at outreach@regionalonehealth.org.  
    Many thanks to Pamela Finnie for her work at the trauma center and for explaining "Stop the Bleed!"
    Thanks for watching! Feedback is always welcome.
    For more fascinating programs, please subscribe: www.youtube.com/c/andrewwilnermdauthor
    #stopthebleed #trauma #polytrauma #gunshotwound #opencarry #nopermit #firearms #hemorrhage
     
     
     

    • 18 min
    The Art of Medicine, Episode #38, Gender Differences in Traumatic Brain Injury

    The Art of Medicine, Episode #38, Gender Differences in Traumatic Brain Injury

     Show Notes
    July 6, 2021
    Many thanks to Maheen Mausoof Adamson, Ph.D., for joining me to discuss gender differences in traumatic brain injury. Dr. Adamson is Clinical Research Director for Rehabilitation Services at the Veterans Administration Palo Alto, CA, and Clinical Associate Professor of Neurosurgery at Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford, CA. I’ve interviewed Dr. Adamson before on ReachMD.com, and I’m grateful for this additional opportunity to discuss her research.
    As the number of women in active military service and extreme sports increases, so does their risk of traumatic brain injury. Dr. Adamson speculated that anatomical variations between men and women, such as skull size, neck size, and hormonal differences, may play a role in both injury severity and healing. Her team’s research has revealed that traumatic brain injury symptoms can vary depending upon gender. For example, similar injuries resulted in more complaints of anxiety, cognitive dysfunction, depression, PTSD, and vertigo from women than men. Gender differences in traumatic brain injury may have critical implications when individualizing treatment with medication, neuromodulation, and rehabilitation.
    Please join us for this 20-minute discussion on gender differences in traumatic brain injury.
    Additional information on Dr. Adamson’s research here: 
    https://profiles.stanford.edu/maheen-adamson
    For more fascinating episodes, please subscribe to “The Art of Medicine with Dr. Andrew Wilner.” www.youtube.com/c/andrewwilnermdauthor
    Links to prior episodes are available at: www.andrewwilner.com/videos
     #traumaticbraininjury #genderdifferences #menstrualmigraine #menstrualseizures #catamenialepilepsy #blastinjury #artofmedicine #TBI
     
     
     

    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

602 Battalion ,

In the End with Dr. Michael Weisberg

Excellent content and very entertaining. I learned a lot from Dr. Weisberg’s opinions and loved the connection he forged with Dr. Wilner.

Top Podcasts In Arts