193 episodes

Welcome to the Ask Mike Reinold Show, where we answer your questions about physical therapy, fitness, strength and conditioning, sports performance, baseball, business, career advice, and more. Join myself, Lenny Macrina, Dave Tilley, Dan Pope, Mike Scaduto and my team at Champion Physical Therapy and Performance in Boston, MA and learn how we help people feel better, move better, and perform better. Ask your questions at http://MikeReinold.com/AskMikeReinold and follow us at @mikereinold, @lenmacpt, @shift_movementscience, @fitnesspainfree, @mikescadutodpt, and @championptp.

The Ask Mike Reinold Show Mike Reinold: Physical Therapist and Performance Enhancement Specialist

    • Medicine

Welcome to the Ask Mike Reinold Show, where we answer your questions about physical therapy, fitness, strength and conditioning, sports performance, baseball, business, career advice, and more. Join myself, Lenny Macrina, Dave Tilley, Dan Pope, Mike Scaduto and my team at Champion Physical Therapy and Performance in Boston, MA and learn how we help people feel better, move better, and perform better. Ask your questions at http://MikeReinold.com/AskMikeReinold and follow us at @mikereinold, @lenmacpt, @shift_movementscience, @fitnesspainfree, @mikescadutodpt, and @championptp.

    How to Periodize Strength Training After ACL Surgery

    How to Periodize Strength Training After ACL Surgery

    On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show we talk about how to periodize strength training after ACL surgery. We all know that it takes a long time for the strength to come back after an ACL, here’s how we tackle that with a more advanced periodization progression. To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 193: How to Periodize Strength Training After ACL Surgery



















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    Show Notes







    * ACL Reconstruction Rehabilitation Protocol* 6 Keys to the Early Phases of Rehabilitation Following ACL Reconstruction Surgery* Return to Play Testing After ACL Reconstruction















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: On this episode of the Ask Mike Reinold show, we talk about how we periodize strength training after surgeries such as ACL reconstruction.







    (Intro)







    Mike Reinold: Austin, what do we have for a question today?







    Student: All right, we got Dan from Minnesota.







    Student: “You’ve talked several times on your podcast about certifications to learn about weight training and becoming proficient at learning those movements. What about periodization principles for a post-op ACL? How do you periodize a strength program to get a quad back to 90%?”







    Mike Reinold: We have talked a lot about physical therapists getting into weight training and how to do that, right? And there’s tons of ways to do it. Probably the best way is the fitness pain-free certification.







    Dan Pope: Wow.







    Lenny Macrina: Whoa.







    Mike Reinold: No, but in full sincerity, yes, absolutely. But I like how you asked your question; it’s not about learning the lifts, it’s not about learning how to do them, how to coach them, how to fix them, how to optimize them, right? But it’s also about how to periodize them, which is more programming. So great question.







    Mike Reinold: So how do we periodize, and I actually used ACL as an example, it’s good. How do we periodize a rehab strength training program?







    Lenny Macrina: First I want to say, it was Dan from Minnesota, right? 90% quad return is not good enough, so rephrase the question or rethink your thoughts.







    Mike Reinold: Wow.

    • 13 min
    Using Vibrating Massage Guns in Physical Therapy

    Using Vibrating Massage Guns in Physical Therapy

    On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show we talk about the popular vibrating massage guns, if we use them at Champion, and if we consider this a form of “skilled” therapy that a physical therapist should be performing. To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 192: Using Vibrating Massage Guns in Physical Therapy



















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    Show Notes







    * The Best Self Myofascial Release Tools















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: On this episode of the Ask Mike Reinold show, we talk about using vibrating massage guns in physical therapy.







    (Intro)







    Student: All right, Daniel from Birmingham asks, “What is your opinion of using vibrating massage guns in PT practice? You consider this skilled therapy in order to bill for it?”







    Mike Reinold: I love how people jam three questions into one sentence, right? That’s kind of cool. What was his name again?







    Student: Daniel.







    Mike Reinold: Daniel from the ‘ham. Good question. So vibrating massage guns. So again dissecting the question. Do we like vibrating massage guns? Right? Is it skilled? And how do you bill for it? Which isn’t our world, but that’s pretty interesting.







    Mike Reinold: So why don’t we start with this. Dewey, who here uses vibrating massage guns?







    Dan Pope: Like in practice?







    Mike Reinold: Yeah, that’s a good one. Who likes them? Do we have them here at Champion?







    Dave Tilley: Yes, yes.







    Lenny Macrina: Yes.







    Mike Reinold: We have a lot. Do our clients like them?







    Lenny Macrina: Love them.







    Mike Reinold: Love them. Something to keep in mind. Well, okay, we’ll talk about that. The clients love that. That’s interesting. So it must make them feel better.







    Lenny Macrina: Right, right.







    Mike Reinold: Good. Do we use them in physical therapy here?







    Dan Pope: Sometimes I think.







    Mike Scaduto: I rarely administer the treatment myself.







    Mike Reinold: I feel like I’ve tried it a couple of times and just felt bad about it the whole time. I feel like, well, you know what, it’s, it comes down to a big question that always happens in physical therapy. We have limited time with our people. Even if you’re in a one on one setting with a person like we are here, even if you’re in that setting here, we have limited time with our people and you hav...

    • 10 min
    How to Prepare to Transition to a Cash-Based Physical Therapy Practice

    How to Prepare to Transition to a Cash-Based Physical Therapy Practice

    On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show we talk about some of the things you should be prepared for if you’re thinking about starting a cash-based physical therapy practice. Transitioning to cash-based PT isn’t easy, but it’s rewarding if you’re prepared. Find out what you can do on this episode. To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 191: How to Prepare to Transition to a Cash-Based Physical Therapy Practice



















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    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes







    * How Self-Pay Patients Have Made Me a More Effective Clinician* Quality Over Quantity















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: On this episode of the Ask Mike Reinold show, we talk about some strategies for you to best prepare to transition to a cash-based PT practice.







    (Intro)







    Mike Reinold: All right, what do we got? Andrew? We got the King?







    Andrew King: So, we have Lindsey from Indianapolis: “As a newer grad looking to open a cash-based practice in the next few years, what would be the most valuable certification to pursue? Manual therapy, OCS, SCS, CSCS, or other strength and conditioning certifications, et cetera?”







    Mike Reinold: Lindsey. Oh, Lindsey. All right, so all right. Let’s dissect the question. So, Lindsay is a new grad, wants to start a cash-based practice, wants to know what certifications, like a OCS, SCS, CSCS, all those acronyms, right? That will be best to help her get a cash practice. And, we can have a whole episode, Lindsey, on whether or not you should be opening up a cash-based practice. I think that’s a whole other question for a new grad on, do you want to immediately get into your own cash-based practice by yourself? Which, kind of sounds like you’re doing. But, let’s talk specifically about what is the best thing Lindsey can do to prepare herself for this?







    Mike Reinold: So, I’m going to rephrase your question a little bit Lindsey, because rather than just say which certification for you to get, I want to know, do we think any of those certifications matter? Did I sway that a little bit? Does it matter for what you want to do? And, maybe what you should do instead. So Mike, you just graduated college, right? I’m kidding. Old joke, sorry. Old joke.







    Mike Scaduto: Fresh wounds though, fresh wounds.







    Mike Reinold: So, Mike was a new grad three years ago, plus? Over three years now.







    Mike Scaduto: Yeah.

    • 12 min
    Getting Back to High Level Activities with an Irreparable Rotator Cuff

    Getting Back to High Level Activities with an Irreparable Rotator Cuff

    On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show we talk about how people with irreparable rotator cuff tears can get back to high levels of function, including things like weight training and obstacle courses raises. We’ll cover if that’s a good idea and if we’re concerned about arthritic changes down the road. To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 190: Getting Back to High Level Activities with an Irreparable Rotator Cuff



















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    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes







    * Can Physical Therapy for Rotator Cuff Tears Prevent Surgery?* Can You Have a Rotator Cuff Tear and No Symptoms?















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: On this episode of the Ask Mike Reinold show, we talk about getting back to high-level activities when you have an irreparable rotator cuff.







    [Intro]







    Mike Reinold: All right, what do we got for a question today?







    Student: All right, we got Dillon from Montana…







    Mike Reinold: Dillon!







    Student: Big fan of the podcast. We have a 48 year old male with an irreparable infraspinatus, who is very active. What kind of outcomes should we expect as he rehabs? His goals is to eventually get back to Spartan Races. Is this feasible or will arthritis develop so bad he will need a shoulder replacement?







    Lenny Macrina: Yes.







    Mike Reinold: Two different questions but I like that. Is it feasible? Yes. All right, so a 48 year old patient with an irreparable rotator cuff, which is a conundrum. I just wanted to use that word in an episode today. So we’re in a conundrum, right? You have an irreparable cuff, which usually means it’s a pretty big cuff tear and it’s probably retracted, right Len? I mean, why else would it be a irreparable?







    Lenny Macrina: Probably yeah.







    Mike Reinold: 48 year olds, it’s probably not like ridiculously chronic. So it’s probably a large tear that’s retracted, meaning they don’t have a chance to put it back. And he wants to get back to high level activity, specifically a Spartan race. But if you’re a Spartan racer, you’re probably a fit person, right? You do a bunch of other things. So why don’t we start with that question and let’s do the two together because I think we will need to address the potential for arthritis down the road. But is it feasible for this person to get back to Spartan races?

    • 12 min
    Should Physical Therapists Squat and Deadlift with Their Patients?

    Should Physical Therapists Squat and Deadlift with Their Patients?

    On this episode of The Ask Mike Reinold Show, we talk about if physical therapists should be loading up big movements like the squat and the deadlift with their patients. To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 189: Should Physical Therapists Squat and Deadlift with Their Patients?



















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    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes







    * Weight training for physical therapists















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: On this episode of the Ask Mike Reinold Show, we talk about wether or not you should be loading some of the big lifts, like squatting and deadlifting, in physical therapy.







    (Intro)







    Mike Reinold: All right so Ricky Bobby from Talladega.







    Student: My boss said to me that PT is not personal training. You need to stop overloading these patients with squats and dead lifts. These patients are injured. You need to take it easy on them. I thought the evidence of large muscle group training in addition to PT exercises is pretty clear. It was tough to hear, especially when I have older patients that lifting 80 plus pounds from the floor with amazing technique and a boost in confidence. My patients love coming to PT because they actually feel like exercise translates to life. What do you think about this?







    Mike Reinold: Great question. You know what? I actually think the second half of your question, Ricky, you did a really good job with this because if you just said the beginning, who knows, maybe you’re squatting and dead lifting people inappropriately all the time. But you said you have older patients that are doing it with a moderate amount of weight with great technique, right? I think you gave us all the info you need, and they feel good about themselves afterwards. It applies to life. You biased the question in a great way. That was awesome. But that is disappointing that your boss says you shouldn’t be doing lifting with people. Mike, you want to start?







    Mike Scaduto: I think I understand where we’re all coming from in terms of what we actually do with our patients. We do all these exercises with them. Could it be that the boss was saying that in insurance based model you can justify your treatment and was possibly not getting reimbursed for these treatments? Could that be? I don’t know. I’ve never worked in insurance pay.







    Dave Tilley: Plot thickens.







    Mike Reinold: Yeah. That could be really interesting that insurance is trying to get you back to baseline. Right? And maybe these things are advanced. I think you could document that well though that these are functional tasks. Squatting and hinging, right? I know that there’s ways to do it,

    • 9 min
    How to Develop a Physical Therapy Treatment Plan and Program

    How to Develop a Physical Therapy Treatment Plan and Program

    On this episode of The Ask Mike Reinold Show, we talk about the steps we take to develop a plan with our patients and clients, and then build our programs. This is often a very daunting subject to students and new grads, but by following a simple systematic approach, you’ll get better in no time. To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 188: How to Develop a Physical Therapy Treatment Plan and Program



















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    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes







    * Introduction to Performance Therapy and Training* The Champion Performance Specialist system















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold: On this episode of the Ask Mike Reinold Show, we talk about how we develop our treatment plans and our program strategies for our patients and clients.







    Mike Reinold: All right. What do we have for questions today? Who’s up? I got it. Whoa. First day.







    Austin: Yeah. I got it. All right. We got Ty from Sarasota. What’s up Champion crew? I love the content on this podcast and thanks for taking my question. I am a DPT student about to graduate in a few months. I feel that my school has done a great job teaching how to identify and diagnose pathology but is not given as much when it comes to treatment and program. Do you have any advice, resources, examples, et cetera on how I can better understand how to program treatment for a person coming to PT.







    Mike Reinold: All right. That’s a pretty common question. I bet. Done a really good job with diagnosis, especially medical diagnosis. I think we’re getting a better understanding of that as we’re getting into the doctor of physical therapy and direct access and all that stuff.







    Mike Reinold: So really good job with diagnostics. But now you’re confused with how to develop a treatment plan. Students quickly… I don’t know. King, what do you think? Do you agree with this question? How did you feel? Do you feel like you are prepared?







    Mike Reinold: Were you… I mean do you guys feel you… go in order. Was there anybody prepared well for treatment?







    Andrew King: I think our school did a great job preparing us.







    Lenny Macrina: Go Hawks!







    Mike Reinold: Why?







    Andrew King: Because they give us a good idea of what to do like initially versus advanced and intermediate. So kind of where to start, what patients can tolerate and how to progress as and what to look for to progress.







    Mike Reinold: That sounds like it’s pretty good right the...

    • 14 min

Customer Reviews

Ethan "Mr.Kinesiology" ,

Extremely enjoyable and educational content!

I’m a senior Pre-PT student and Mike Reinold is someone who has really allowed me to foster my passion for Physical Therapy!! I always listen to his podcasts while driving and it’s disappointing when my drives end. I think there should be a rule that after listening to all of The Mike Reinold Show podcasts, you should be allowed to skip PT school and be given exemption from the NPTE!! Just kidding! But, I’ve learned so much!
Thanks Mike, Lenny, Dave, Mike S, and Dan for teaching us and the laughs you given many of us along the way! *cough shoulder impingement *cough is a cool topic *cough *cough

Iz S ,

A podcast without Serious discussions

This podcast is just one big joke—It’s not for serious PT’s who want to be the best. They just talk in general terms about vague items of discussion. Save your time and listening ear....

LiveForAdventure82 ,

My Favorite PTs!

I’m a PT in my 3rd year of my career and I find Mike and Friends super helpful! I listen to the podcast daily during my lunch walks. I think I’ve finally listened to all of them though!!

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