273 episodes

Welcome to the Ask Mike Reinold Show, where we answer your questions about physical therapy, fitness, strength and conditioning, sports performance, baseball, business, career advice, and more. Join myself, Lenny Macrina, Dave Tilley, Dan Pope, Mike Scaduto, Lisa Russell, Diwesh Poudyal, and my team at Champion Physical Therapy and Performance in Boston, MA and learn how we help people feel better, move better, and perform better. Ask your questions at http://MikeReinold.com/AskMikeReinold and follow us at @mikereinold, @lenmacpt, @shift_movementscience, @fitnesspainfree, @mikescadutodpt, and @championptp.

The Ask Mike Reinold Show Mike Reinold: Physical Therapist and Performance Enhancement Specialist

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 335 Ratings

Welcome to the Ask Mike Reinold Show, where we answer your questions about physical therapy, fitness, strength and conditioning, sports performance, baseball, business, career advice, and more. Join myself, Lenny Macrina, Dave Tilley, Dan Pope, Mike Scaduto, Lisa Russell, Diwesh Poudyal, and my team at Champion Physical Therapy and Performance in Boston, MA and learn how we help people feel better, move better, and perform better. Ask your questions at http://MikeReinold.com/AskMikeReinold and follow us at @mikereinold, @lenmacpt, @shift_movementscience, @fitnesspainfree, @mikescadutodpt, and @championptp.

    Enhancing Strength and Stability in Athletes

    Enhancing Strength and Stability in Athletes

    I really feel to optimize movement and maximize performance, you need to work on both strength and dynamic stability.







    But sometimes people need to focus on one more than the other.







    Here’s how we try to integrate the two concepts with our patients and athletes.







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 273: Enhancing Strength and Stability in Athletes



















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    Show Notes







    * Free course on the Introduction to Performance Therapy and Training















    Transcript







    Student:All right. We have Noah from Chicago. Chicago. He is asking after going through your Champion Performance Specialist program, I’ve learned that you advocate for working on both strength and stability to optimize performance in athletes. Can you give some examples of how you build programs in the gym that incorporate both?







    Mike Reinold:I like that. Great question. Thank you, Noah from Chicago. Really good question. I think, for some reason with the strength and stability concept, some people are usually really good at one and maybe not so awesome at others. And to me, it’s just a lack of experience. You have to just understand and see that little bit, how they come together. So that’s a big thing that we do at Champion, and we talk about all the time is, is how we work on both strength and stability throughout the body. Right?







    Mike Reinold:So it was funny, Diwesh and I were, I think we were just talking about this the other day, right. With some of our off season, like training programs, how to work on some of those stability things and stuff like that. So Dewey why don’t you start with that kind of concept. So we have somebody that obviously needs to build some strength, but we are a big believer here at Champion that we also have to work on how they control that strength, and optimizing their movement. So how do you work stability into people’s programs? And then maybe if you can even give some examples, I think that’d be great.







    Diwesh Poudyal:Yeah, for sure. So for me, the first thing that I kind of start with is the needs analysis of the athlete. So inherently we got to figure out is, whatever sport or whatever activity this person does. Is it a little bit more biased towards needing to be super, super strong and powerful? Or is it maybe a little bit more required towards being stable? So I think that is going to help kind of figure out what do we have a little bit more of. And then from there, we start picking exercises that are going to be a little bit more biased towards one versus the other, after we’ve done that needs analysis. So for example, if we do a bilateral loaded squat, obviously that is going to be bilateral symmetrical, very stable position. So the focus there is going to be building strength.

    • 14 min
    When to Push Range of Motion After Surgery

    When to Push Range of Motion After Surgery

    One of the more common questions we get is how to know when to push range of motion after surgery, and when to back off.







    You don’t want your patients to fall behind and get tight, but sometimes the harder you push the worse they get!







    Luckily, we have some tips to know when and how to push range of motion when you need it.







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 272: When to Push Range of Motion After Surgery



















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    Show Notes







    * Assessing and Treating Loss of Knee Extension Range of Motion 















    Transcript







    Student:Hey, Champion team. With postoperative knees, how aggressive are you with pushing for range of motion? How much pain is appropriate? I’ve had patients scared to push and in pain when trying to get this motion back. So we back off, but then they struggle to achieve the ranges that I would consider adequate.







    MIke Reinold:I love it. Great question, Kim, and Kim from Washington.







    Lenny Macrina:Yeah. Lots of Kims.







    MIke Reinold:Yeah. I think that’s probably one of the most common dilemmas, especially with some early career professionals that are trying to figure this out, is how hard to push. We kind of hear that a lot of time with range of motion, how hard to push. And what I really like about the way Kim phrased this question sometimes is she’s battling pain or discomfort with the patient and the concept that if she feels like she doesn’t push, they get behind and range of motion, which is quite valid. Right. She’s got to find that little blend a little bit. Who wants to start this one off? Let me see.







    Lenny Macrina:I can, if you want. I don’t mind.







    MIke Reinold:You know Lenny’s going to, if nobody else does. [crosstalk 00:03:40]







    Lenny Macrina:Small hesitation, I’m in.







    MIke Reinold:Right. All right. What do you got, Len?







    Lenny Macrina:Here we go. No, I mean I get this question a lot. I got a lot of DMs. I got one the other day about this, actually. I think I put a video or two out on my YouTube channel about it because I think it’s, like Mike said, it’s one of those common things. A lot of it comes down to feel and experience with bending knees, moving shoulders, things of that nature. It looks like I am aggressive when I’m pushing on knees… And maybe the students can even comment too. That might be interesting to get their perspective because we have a few people right now that have some stiffness in their knees or whatever, and I will let them bend and then I bend and then get feedback from the patient to see how aggressive one of us is.

    • 18 min
    Returning to CrossFit After Rotator Cuff Repair

    Returning to CrossFit After Rotator Cuff Repair

    Returning to CrossFit after a major surgery like rotator cuff repair is a long process that shouldn’t be rushed. But that doesn’t mean it’s not possible.







    Here are some steps you can take to progress someone from post-operative to advanced exercises like snatches, kipping pull ups, and muscle ups.







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 271: Returning to CrossFit After Rotator Cuff Repair



















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    Show Notes







    * Injuries in Crossfit















    Transcript







    Kim Le :Question is Julia from Alabama, wants to know following a full thickness supraspinatus rotator cuff repair, when would it be okay for a patient who’s a CrossFitter to return to Olympic lifting, strict pull ups, as well as tipping in other gymnastics movements, such as toes to bar and insane pushups and muscle ups?







    Mike Reinold:Wow. It is interesting. Good question, Julia. Roll tide. Good question. I like that. Len, did she have too many words for one sentence? Is that a run?







    Lenny Macrina:I was offended by the question because of all the run on sentences.







    Mike Reinold:I thought that was a great question. I just want to run the grammar by you if you’re a long time listener. Awesome. This is the Dan Pope show here for this, but I like at least how Julia is specific. She probably has somebody in mind, which is kind of cool. But a full thickness cuff tear, which I think is important to say and Supraspinatus is, by the way, that’s usually what a full thickness cuff tear is. That’s not the crazy part for me. But full thickness, meaning this was like a real tear. It’s not a partial, it’s not a transtendinous. When can you get back? And then she lists everything, right? So there’s a ton of things, but it’s a really good question, and I’m sure there’s a lot to it. But I would say the majority of PTs out there are probably scared of getting their cuff patients back to these types of activities, right? How do you approach this, Dan?







    Dan Pope:That’s a big question. And we could probably spend long, long time on this. I’ll try not to. What I will say is that these are my best guesses, right? And there’s actually one research article that came out recently and talked about how long it took to get it back to some of these movements. So like the snatch and the muscle up were around 9 to 11 months, but most of those folks were acute tears and partial thickness actually. It’s probably a little bit different for those folks compared to someone who has a larger cuff tear. Generally speaking, I think that around the 12 week mark is when you can start what we consider traditional weight lifting type stuff, right?







    Dan Pope:I think that’s going to really depen...

    • 16 min
    Networking at Conferences

    Networking at Conferences

    Attending large professional conferences can be rewarding to network with other peers and experts in your field. Here are some tips to get the most out of these events, even if you aren’t an extrovert!







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 270: Networking at Conferences



















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    Show Notes







    * How to Become a Sports Physical Therapist* Starting Your Physical Therapy Career Off Right















    Transcript







    Morgan Kennedy:There are no oinks but I appreciate that Mandy from Ohio, put this question now, so here we are. What advice do you have for students and other young professionals regarding networking at professional conferences?







    Mike Reinold:Good question, Mandy. So I like this, so we just had the American Academy of Sports Physical therapy, we just had our first annual meeting a couple of weeks ago or so, I don’t know when this episode is going to come out, but I think that’s why Mandy submitted this question because she was starting to think of stuff like that. And it was funny, there, there was a good amount of networking events where, it was about trying to gather people, a bit of a community. We’re trying to have a little bit of that sense to that meeting where there’s a bit of community behind it. And it was funny, if you’re an extrovert you thrive in that environment, right. You just show up to the bar, the hotel lobby for the registration cocktail hour stuff and just start talking to people.







    Mike Reinold:So, extroverts that are in their wheelhouse can dominate those settings because they’re not afraid to go up to people and start talking. But introverts, I would imagine, I mean you don’t even show up to the cocktail hour. You just avoid it completely. So I think this is a great question because I think there’s, maybe some strategies we can talk about that you can do this. We’ve all had good success stories and some funny stories of people at meetings that come up. We always talk about the students, they like to… we talked about this at times where they come up to me like, “Hey Mike, I really wanted to ask you a question, what do you think about the shoulder? And you’re just like, “Man, ah, that’s too broad of a question”. Can we chat for a little bit first and get to know each other?







    Mike Reinold:But, it was funny, I was with my friend Chuck Thigpen, so great PT researcher that you guys probably know his name. And it was funny, he was coming back from dinner and he joined us at the reception and he jumped right into the conversation. He was just like, “Hey I’m Chuck, hey I’m Chuck, hey I’m Chuck, hey I’m Chuck”.

    • 16 min
    Extension Lag Following Knee Surgery

    Extension Lag Following Knee Surgery

    A common issue after knee surgery is quad weakness that may result in a knee extension lag. This can have many consequences for future strength gains and gait training, so it’s always best to address this quickly.







    Here are some strategies we use at Champion when someone has a knee extension lag.







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 269: Extension Lag Following Knee Surgery



















    Listen and Subscribe to Podcast







    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes







    * Assessing and Treating Loss of Knee Extension Range of Motion* Tips for Regaining Full Knee Extension After Surgery















    Transcript







    Student:All right. So, we got Tom from New York asking, “Following a knee surgery, like ACL reconstruction what do you do if a patient is having a hard time completing a straight leg raise without extension lag? Would performing the exercise with a brace lock then extension be appropriate?”







    Mike Reinold:Awesome. Yeah. Great question, Tom. Good job, Zach.







    Mike Reinold:Yeah, that’s pretty common, right? That’s definitely something we see. This is probably a pretty good question because I bet you a lot of people see this and it’d be nice to just kind of hear everybody’s tips on what we do.







    Mike Reinold:ACL is probably one of the more common ones, but it really can be from any knee surgery, that knee extension lag where they’re trying to do a straight leg raise, but they don’t have that quad control to lock out the knee and do it straight. I mean, essentially it’s just a sign that the quadricep strength is just not there. Or it’s just not active for that ability to lift that leg straight.







    Mike Reinold:So, what do we got for tips on that? I mean, I think we had a few tricks up our sleeves with that. But who wants to jump in and offer the first tip of advice for what you do with a lag with a straight leg raise?







    Lenny Macrina:Is that what the question is? I’m confused by the question.







    Mike Reinold:Are you serious? I can’t tell if you’re serious.







    Lenny Macrina:It says without an extension lag? So, if they don’t have an extension, is there something else? Am I just not understanding the question?







    Mike Reinold:No, you’re definitely not understanding the question. What do you do if a patient is having a hard time completing a leg raise without lag?







    Mike Reinold:Oh.







    Lenny Macrina:So, without a lag, that means the left knee is straight.

    • 13 min
    Starting an Athlete’s Offseason Training

    Starting an Athlete’s Offseason Training

    The start of offseason training is important to recover from the season and set the foundation of progress to enhance performance.







    You want to evaluate an athlete’s workload from the season, their response to that workload, and then build their capacity for even more next season.







    Here are the keys to the beginning of an offseason that we focus on with athletes at Champion.







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 268: Starting an Athlete’s Offseason Training



















    Listen and Subscribe to Podcast







    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes







    * How to Get the Most Out of the Start of Your Baseball Offseason Training* The Difference Between Inseason and Offseason Training















    Transcript







    Morgan:Today, actually Kim is going to be doing the first question. I’m just in charge of the computer.







    Mike Reinold:Oh, Okay. I mean, you propped up and got super excited. You were elbowing out the other students though. I thought that was cool, but… All right. What do we got, Kim?







    Kim:Sean from Florida asks, “With the start of the baseball off season approaching, I was curious what things you would initially focus on within [inaudible 00:02:43] ending a long season and starting their off season training.”







    Mike Reinold:Awesome. I thought that was a really good question too, Sean. I appreciate you submitting that one there. Obviously, you use the word baseball, right? Because baseball off season’s coming, but I just thought it was a great question just to talk about what we do at the start of an athlete’s off season, right? Because you could argue what we’re about to do in this first beginning phase is going to set the tone and really set the foundation for the rest of the off season and what we could do.







    Mike Reinold:So, I think we’re in the same boat as you, Sean. We started to have some of our athletes start rolling in, and we started having these conversations. Diwesh and I was just having this conversation yesterday, but one of our athletes and how we’re going to phase out his off season. So Diwe, you want to start this one off, I guess, and see where the conversation takes us? But like when an athlete’s coming into you at the start of their off season, and we know they just had a long season, and we’re about to start this period where we can focus on them. What are your initial goals for that beginning phase? I think that’s a really cool question.







    Diwesh Poudyal:Yeah, for sure. And before I dive into kind of what we would do, the few things that I would consider for sure is a little bit of what they did during the s...

    • 15 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
335 Ratings

335 Ratings

Quint le ,

PT Student praise 🙌🏻

As as SPT, this was exactly the podcast I was looking for that discusses relevant clinical topics specifically for athletic populations!

HS101Main ,

Excellent resource

As a PT with 25 years experience in dance and sports medicine, I highly recommend this pod cast to physical therapists and athletic trainers at all levels of experience. Mike and his team are generous in sharing their knowledge and experience promoting best evidence based practices. Even if well versed in the topic of a particular pod cast, it is always validating and I still learn something. THANK YOU Mike and everyone at Champion PT!

Reremy Jenner ,

Perfect on the go

I have a short commute and these episodes are perfect to listen to and gain insights into things like sport performance and exercise prescription on the ride to and from the clinic. Well done.

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