279 episodes

Welcome to the Ask Mike Reinold Show, where we answer your questions about physical therapy, fitness, strength and conditioning, sports performance, baseball, business, career advice, and more. Join myself, Lenny Macrina, Dave Tilley, Dan Pope, Mike Scaduto, Lisa Russell, Diwesh Poudyal, and my team at Champion Physical Therapy and Performance in Boston, MA and learn how we help people feel better, move better, and perform better. Ask your questions at http://MikeReinold.com/AskMikeReinold and follow us at @mikereinold, @lenmacpt, @shift_movementscience, @fitnesspainfree, @mikescadutodpt, and @championptp.

The Ask Mike Reinold Show Mike Reinold: Physical Therapist and Performance Enhancement Specialist

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 340 Ratings

Welcome to the Ask Mike Reinold Show, where we answer your questions about physical therapy, fitness, strength and conditioning, sports performance, baseball, business, career advice, and more. Join myself, Lenny Macrina, Dave Tilley, Dan Pope, Mike Scaduto, Lisa Russell, Diwesh Poudyal, and my team at Champion Physical Therapy and Performance in Boston, MA and learn how we help people feel better, move better, and perform better. Ask your questions at http://MikeReinold.com/AskMikeReinold and follow us at @mikereinold, @lenmacpt, @shift_movementscience, @fitnesspainfree, @mikescadutodpt, and @championptp.

    Strength of ACL Grafts Over Time

    Strength of ACL Grafts Over Time

    An important concept to master ACL rehabilitation is to understand the normal healing process of an ACL graft.







    Different grafts heal at different rates depending on the tissue and fixation method.







    Here’s what we know about the healing rates of ACL autografts.







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 279: Strength of ACL Grafts Over Time



















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    Show Notes







    * What is the Best Graft Choice for ACL Reconstruction?* 6 Keys to the Early Phases of ACL Rehabilitation















    Transcript







    Student:All Right. You got Jeff from Washington DC. He asks, “When it comes to ACL grafts, can you speak to the strength of patella tendon grafts versus other autografts over time, including any weakening caused by remodeling of the tissue?” And as a bonus question, how the strength of the graft sites for patella tendon, hamstring tendon, and quad tendon are impacted.







    Mike Reinold:You know, Jeff, you snuck two questions in there and that it’s a faux pas. Right? That’s a podcast faux pas. But no. Awesome. Good questions together. I think that’s pretty good. This is one of those ones that if we go through the decades of research, I think we do have some of these answers, but I like it. Len, let’s see how much you can tackle and see if we even need to add anything to this. But ACL grafts over time, the strength of the grafts of an autograft over time, how strong are they when we first put them in? What happens over the course of the ACL? Give us the rundown.







    Lenny Macrina:Yeah. Here comes the rant. No, this should be nice. This will be peaceful. Does matter? I feel like.







    Mike Reinold:Oh, that’s not peaceful or nice.







    Lenny Macrina:I know.







    Mike Reinold:You just threw it back at him.







    Lenny Macrina:To me, it matters, but we don’t treat it like it matters because if you look at the research, the graft is strongest when you put it in. So it’s stronger than your native ACL, whether it’s a patella tendon, a hamstring tendon, or a quad tendon. And so when you put it into the knee, it’s stronger than anything you were born with. And so over time, it is thought to weaken. It’s ligamentizing.

    • 13 min
    Does Poor Movement Predict Injury?

    Does Poor Movement Predict Injury?

    Predicting injury is a very complicated topic. It’s not as simple as looking at a movement and saying that it is “good” or “bad.”







    Poor movement may not predict injury, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t focus on optimizing movement.







    Here’s why we still focus on movement quality, even if “poor” movement may not correlate with injury.







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 278: Does Poor Movement Predict Injury?



















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    Show Notes







    * Do You Want to Learn More About Optimizing Movement and Enhancing Performance?















    Transcript







    Student:All right. Chet from new Orleans asks, “I don’t think there’s good evidence that poor movement predicts injury. Is this true? If it doesn’t, how do you guys think about the things in the clinic? Do you bother to educate your patients about these things?”







    Mike Reinold:Awesome. Nailed it, Cody. I like that. Good job. That was great. So, all right. Movement predicting injury. We’ve all been through this conversation before, right? Yeah, initially when this movement screen concept came about, right? And we had a lot of screens came to the market-some really good ones, some really well thought out designed ones. You know them, we don’t need to name them by names, they’re all excellent types of screens. There was some initial buzz as research started coming out, and some research was shown that you could predict injury with some of these screens. But it seems like to me, and I’m kind of curious if anybody else has a different thought, or if they’ve read something different, but it seems like the more we research these types of screens, and the more we try to do one generic screen on a large variety of athletes, and sports, and genders, and positions, right? And all these different things that you could have, that the harder it is to have one screen that predicts injury, right? So, I think we’re seeing that a lot of time.







    Mike Reinold:But I think what Chet is getting at here too is, if the evidence is showing that movement doesn’t predict injury, do we still work on movement in the clinic? Do we work on optimal movement? And again, this is where the early career professionals and the students, they have a hard time reconciling what they’re seeing on social media with people slamming all these concepts, and knowing what to do. So who wants to start this one? Does movement predict injury? And if it doesn’t, which it probably doesn’t predict injury, do we still care if a person moves good, bad, et cetera? Who wants to start that one?







    Lenny Macrina:I’ll take the obvious, right?

    • 23 min
    Working in Professional Sports: Pros and Cons

    Working in Professional Sports: Pros and Cons

    Many physical therapists dream of working in professional sports. I’ve been fortunate to work with professional athletes my entire career. It is great to have highly motivated athletes that you can see throughout the entire spectrum of rehabilitation and performance.







    But, there are long hours, a lack of autonomy, and other increased demands.







    In this podcast episode, I’m joined by the team of physical therapists with the Chicago White Sox. Here are some of the pros and cons of working in professional sports so you understand what you’re getting yourself into.







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 277: Working in Professional Sports: Pros and Cons



















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    Show Notes







    * How to Become a Sports Physical Therapist* 5 Tips for Landing a Sports Medicine Job in Professional Sports* How to Work with Professional Athletes















    Transcript







    Mike Reinold:Hey, welcome back everyone. Thanks so much for joining us on this really special podcast episode. We’ve done similar episodes like this before. I know we’ve had a couple of people that are on this call in past episodes, but really excited to get together with a group of really fantastic physical therapists, that all work with me with the Chicago White Sox. So a bunch of great people, obviously all with the physical therapy background that are working in pro sports, and really wanted to get together and have an episode about talking about working with professional athletes, because a lot of people say that’s what they want. A lot of students, a lot of early career professionals think that, the thing that they want to get into with is physical therapy. And I think as we’ll learn tonight as we go through the podcast a little bit, we all agree.







    Mike Reinold:That’s why we’re doing it. We have a blast working with pro athletes, but I think sometimes though having a good understanding, of maybe some of the pros and the cons of working with pro athletes, just so you have a realistic expectation of what it’s like in this setting, I think would be really cool to go over. So want to introduce everybody to everybody on this podcast episode. First we have, Brett Walker. Maybe we give a quick wave, Brett.







    Brett Walker:How’s it going, guys?







    Mike Reinold:Brett, is the Director of Physical Therapy Rehabilitation with us, the Chicago White Sox, up in Chicago. We have, Brooks Klein. He’s our Rehab Coordinator in… I almost said Phoenix,

    • 30 min
    Using BFR After Knee Surgery

    Using BFR After Knee Surgery

    Blood flow restriction training is a great technique to be able to help people gain strength in a low load environment. So using BFR after knee surgery is a great idea.







    But there are a few different ways we use blood flow restriction training after surgery. Here are some ways that we apply BFR after knee surgery.







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 276: Using BFR After Knee Surgery



















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    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes







    * Ultimate Guide to Blood Flow Restriction Training* The Best Blood Flow Restriction Bands















    Transcript







    Student:Right. So we got, “Using BFR after knee surgery”. Tom from Maryland, “I recently purchased Mike and Dan Lorenz’s online course on blood flow restriction training. And I’m excited to start using BFR with my patients. I’d love to hear how you all utilize BFR in a postoperative patient. Maybe discuss a case example of a knee surgery patient and how you started using BFR and how you progressed it over their rehab.”







    Mike Reinold:Awesome. Good job Eric. I like it. Yeah. You know what? I actually think that’s a fairly common question. We see that a lot online, like on social media, you guys probably seen that a little bit too is I think everybody’s … blood flow restriction traits getting more popular, right? BFR is definitely more popular, but I think a lot of people lack the creativity of exactly how to apply it. And I don’t blame him. It’s new. You don’t want to do it wrong. You don’t want to waste time. You don’t want to like, have any safety things. So, Dan Lorenz and I, that teamed up for that course. Kind of talk about this a little bit all the time is that a lot of people need a little guidance.







    Mike Reinold:So we have some case studies in our course and stuff like that. But I like this question from Tom here where he is like, look, just walk me through like how you would use it on somebody and we can kind of go from there. So I don’t know if anybody, I know we have a few people just off the top of my head. I know, Dan’s doing it on a couple people. Dave’s doing it on a couple people. I haven’t been a sector right now. Len’s done some ACL. So, why don’t we each take turns and just share, when did you start using it? How’d you start using it and how’d that progress over time? Like as case studies, but Dave, you want to start it off?







    Dave Tilley:Yeah, sure. So I think probably the most classic one that I recently had was just a soccer player, ACL hamstring graft. And I think we started probably like three or four weeks.

    • 18 min
    Knees Over Toes – Is it Really Bad?

    Knees Over Toes – Is it Really Bad?

    I always wonder where some of the more common misconceptions in our professions came from. One, in particular, is the concept that if your knees pass your toes, it’s bad for your knees.







    That’s such a shortsighted and broad statement.







    But, rather than asking if a movement is good or bad, maybe we should just understand the biomechanics and stress?







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 275: Knees Over Toes – Is it Really Bad?



















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    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes







    * 4 Ways to Modify the Squat So Everyone Can Perform















    Transcript







    Kim Lai:Ryan from Massachusetts asked, can you discuss the knees over toes debate? Do you let people do movements like squats and lunges with their knees going over their toes? And does it change depending on the person’s sport, goals, or previous injury?







    Mike Reinold:Ooh, we get another debate. We’re going to dispel more debates or myths here. So that’s funny the knees over toes, I always wonder. Let’s start the episode of this, the knees over toe debate, I guess is that a lot of people or some people in the past, there’s a common misconception probably out there that people say that if you do an activity like a squat or lung or step type movement and your knee translates, you bend your knee so much that it translates over your toes. So assuming you’re getting depth that it puts a lot of stress on your knee joint, it’s too much stress. A lot of people say, don’t let your knees pass your toes. That’s a very common kind of phrase. Right? So I’ll start the episode off with this and just say like, I just always wonder if this is one of those things that social media, and maybe even some early career professionals, take this a little too serious, right?







    Mike Reinold:Meaning, nobody really thinks your knees are going to blow up if they go up over your toes. Even the first person that ever said that, probably didn’t say that this is one of those things that I think somebody took too far. Right? So in both ways, there’s probably some people in the medical community and fitness community that took it too far and said that you know you should never go knees over toes. But I would say the vast majority of people understand that’s a little excessive. So I feel like this debate has probably been a little bit more sensationalized, but Dan Pope you probably get asked this question a lot online and you probably are involved in these discussions probably more than any of us right here. What do you think? Do you want to give your two cents on this?







    Dan Pope:Yeah, for sure. I think it really just comes down to physics and the simplest way to explain it for me is; let’s say a squat, right?

    • 16 min
    Using Higher Loads with Rotator Cuff Exercises

    Using Higher Loads with Rotator Cuff Exercises

    A common misconception with rotator cuff exercises is that if you go too heavy, you’ll use less cuff and more of the bigger muscles like the deltoid.







    This really isn’t true at all.







    Can you go up too fast and compensate? Sure. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t load the cuff more.







    To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







    #AskMikeReinold Episode 274: Using Higher Loads with Rotator Cuff Exercises



















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    You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















    Show Notes







    * 4 Myths of Rotator Cuff Exercises















    Transcript







    Eric Deutch:All right. We got Corey from Pittsburgh X. What are your thoughts on never using higher loads for rotator cuff exercises? Because it anatomically recruits the wrong muscles?







    Mike Reinold:Okay. I like that. Let me see. So Cory from Pittsburgh says, all right. We still get this question every now and then, but I feel like this is one of those questions that kind of faded a little bit. I remember 20 years ago, it was, I don’t want to say common fact, I don’t think it was a fact, I think a lot of people doubted it, but it was very commonly stated that you only do rotator cuff exercises up to set amount. And then once you go higher, if you go one ounce higher, all of a sudden the rotator cuff turns off and the big muscles take over and the big one at the time was five pounds. You can’t do more than five pounds with rotator cuff exercises or the deltoid, the pec, the lat, that’ll take over and you’re just using the wrong muscles.







    Mike Reinold:And it’s funny, every now and then, I guess that still happens, right. Because we’ll have like a baseball player come in and they’re like 6’5, 240, right. And I’m like, all right, let’s go through your shoulder program. They go grab like the two pound weights. And you’re like, what on earth are you doing? That’s 0.08% your body weight, right. With a two pound weight. That’s what we would do with a rotator cuff repair patient, right after surgery. Right. And it’s still amazing to believe that some people kind of still think that. So who wants to talk about this first and kind of start with this concept, but I guess the question is, is do we think that we should limit the amount of load we do with rotator cuff exercises? Maybe we start with that. Maybe I’ll kind of start the discussion. Anybody want to talk about working the rotator cuff in that fashion? What do you got Dave?







    Dave Tilley:Yeah, I think this is also one very, very common in the aesthetic sports world. So like gymnastics and ballet and dance and stuff like that. It happens to a lot people. I think the myth that we have is their endurance muscles, so you should only do lightweight for 15 to 25 reps. And that’s how the cuff should work.

    • 12 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
340 Ratings

340 Ratings

Quint le ,

PT Student praise 🙌🏻

As as SPT, this was exactly the podcast I was looking for that discusses relevant clinical topics specifically for athletic populations!

HS101Main ,

Excellent resource

As a PT with 25 years experience in dance and sports medicine, I highly recommend this pod cast to physical therapists and athletic trainers at all levels of experience. Mike and his team are generous in sharing their knowledge and experience promoting best evidence based practices. Even if well versed in the topic of a particular pod cast, it is always validating and I still learn something. THANK YOU Mike and everyone at Champion PT!

Reremy Jenner ,

Perfect on the go

I have a short commute and these episodes are perfect to listen to and gain insights into things like sport performance and exercise prescription on the ride to and from the clinic. Well done.

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