30 episodes

Every good story starts local. So that’s where we start. The Bay is storytelling for daily news. KQED host Devin Katayama talks with reporters to help us make sense of what’s happening in the Bay Area. One story. One conversation. One idea.

The Bay KQED

    • Daily News

Every good story starts local. So that’s where we start. The Bay is storytelling for daily news. KQED host Devin Katayama talks with reporters to help us make sense of what’s happening in the Bay Area. One story. One conversation. One idea.

    What It Takes to Help ‘Newcomer’ Immigrant Students in Oakland

    What It Takes to Help ‘Newcomer’ Immigrant Students in Oakland

    Many local leaders in the Bay Area have made it a point to say that their communities are welcoming places for new immigrants, including those who are undocumented, are seeking asylum or are refugees.



    Oakland Unified School District prides itself on helping "newcomer" students. And this year, they could see an unprecedented number of new arrivals. But the district can't always get new students enrolled in class, let alone provide all the help that families and kids need.



    Guest: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED education reporter

    • 12 min
    Indie Artists Vs. The Frida Kahlo Corporation

    Indie Artists Vs. The Frida Kahlo Corporation

    You can find Frida Kahlo's image all over the Bay Area. The Mexican painter lived in San Francisco for a little bit in the '30s and '40s with her husband, Diego Rivera.



    She became even more famous in the years after she died, and now you can find her name and likeness on everything from shoes, to tequila, to even Barbie dolls.



    The Frida Kahlo Corporation, which is behind many of these products, wants to monopolize the use of her name — and it's been going after indie artists who make and sell Frida Kahlo-inspired art. Now, one California artist is taking company to court in San Francisco later this month.



    Guest: Chloe Veltman, KQED arts and culture reporter



    We're off on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. But you should check out the latest column from KQED's Pendarvis Harshaw, where he connects King's moral arguments with what's happening in the Bay Area today.

    • 12 min
    The Anonymous Companies That Buy Up Homes

    The Anonymous Companies That Buy Up Homes

    Even if you can afford to buy a home in the Bay Area, you might get outbid by an anonymous shell company paying cash.

    • 11 min
    ‘Unapologetic’: Jerry Brown’s Legacy in Oakland

    ‘Unapologetic’: Jerry Brown’s Legacy in Oakland

    Oakland feels a lot different today than it did when Jerry Brown was elected mayor in 1998. That’s because he had a lot to do with how the city changed.



    The unapologetic and sometimes controversial Brown is featured in KQED's newest podcast, The Political Mind of Jerry Brown. Today, we're zeroing in on his time as mayor of Oakland, which set the stage for what we're seeing today.



    Guest: Guy Marzorati, KQED politics reporter



    Subscribe to KQED’s new podcast The Political Mind of Jerry Brown here. 

    • 19 min
    What Does Safety For Trans People In Prison Look Like?

    What Does Safety For Trans People In Prison Look Like?

    Prison can be a brutal place for anyone. But for trans people who are incarcerated, it's even more dangerous.



    A new bill in California's state legislature is aimed at making conditions safer. If passed, it would allow transgender inmates to choose whether to be incarcerated in men's or women's facilities.



    KQED reporters visited the California Medical Facility, a men’s prison in Vacaville, to hear why some transgender inmates see this bill as a life saving measure, while others say more needs to be done to protect them.



    Guest: Miranda Leitsinger, KQED reporter

    • 15 min
    For Many Immigrants With Advanced Degrees, It’s ‘Sink Or Swim’

    For Many Immigrants With Advanced Degrees, It’s ‘Sink Or Swim’

    When Dr. Wilmer Garcia Ricardo came to the U.S. from Cuba he couldn't find work as a physician, and he had to figure out the licensing process almost entirely on his own.



    He's not the only one. An estimated 450,000 immigrants living in California have a degree but are underemployed.  Many have to take on low-wage jobs. So why is it so hard to prevent ‘brain waste’ of highly skilled immigrants, especially in fields where so much help is needed?















    Guest: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED immigration reporter

    • 14 min

Customer Reviews

Asarien ,

Doing Important Work

Thank you for unifying the voices and communities within the Bay.

Food admirer ,

Thought provoking

Objective reporting of facts that impact the community. This podcast is fun, very interesting, and informative.

mihyphyke ,

A little tilted

Pretty biased and not very good.

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