164 episodes

A weekly round-up of top business and financial news from China's leading financial magazine, Caixin, produced and hosted by the Sinica Podcast's Kaiser Kuo, featuring full stories from Caixin and conversations with Caixin writers and editors.

The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief SupChina

    • Business
    • 3.9 • 39 Ratings

A weekly round-up of top business and financial news from China's leading financial magazine, Caixin, produced and hosted by the Sinica Podcast's Kaiser Kuo, featuring full stories from Caixin and conversations with Caixin writers and editors.

    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 165

    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 165

    This week on the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief: Reports show that China’s Sichuan Province plans to shutter all bitcoin mining operations in the region; Huawei Technologies has extended a recent move into the high-tech microchip sector with a new investment in high-powered lasers; and the Australian trade minister has announced he will refer China to the World Trade Organization for dispute resolution over 200% tariffs on Australian wine. 

    In addition, we speak with Caixin Global managing editor Doug Young about the company Aìhuíshōu (爱回收) and its recent IPO in New York.

    • 14 min
    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 164

    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 164

    This week on the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief: The Chinese embassy in the United Kingdom has criticized a statement made by leaders of the G-7; Tech giant ByteDance is now aspiring to become a technology supplier for companies hoping to digitize; and a Hong Kong-based tech startup has created a robot that uses artificial intelligence to diagnose patients. 

    In addition, we speak with Caixin Global company editor Matthew Walsh about the increasingly popular fast fashion app SheIn.

    • 17 min
    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 163

    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 163

    This week on the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief: China adjusts its family planning policy to allow people to have up to three children; Tencent’s cloud computing arm adds four new internet data centers in Thailand, Germany, Japan, and Hong Kong; and 11 Chinese tutoring companies are fined by the country’s marketing regulator for false advertising and pricing fraud. 

    In addition, we speak with Caixin Global financial news reporter Tang Ziyi about the yuan’s recent surge against the U.S. dollar.

    • 12 min
    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 162

    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 162

    This week on the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief: In an effort to reduce energy consumption, China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region prepares to crack down on bitcoin mining; a new study analyzes the potential environmental impact of 5G technologies; and China’s yuan surges to a three-year high against the U.S. dollar. 

    In addition, we speak with Nandini Venkata about an ultramarathon in Gansu province where extreme weather claimed the lives of 21 contestants.

    • 17 min
    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 161

    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 161

    This week on the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief: Twenty-one marathon runners die in a storm in northwestern China; ByteDance co-founder Zhāng Yīmíng 张一鸣 announces that he will step down as CEO of the company; and Yuán Lóngpíng 袁隆平, the “father of hybrid rice,” passes away at age 90.

    In addition, we speak with Caixin Global financial news reporter Timmy Shen about the recent crash in cryptocurrency prices and what this means for the future of the market.

    • 10 min
    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 160

    The Caixin-Sinica Business Brief, episode 160

    This week on the Caixin-Sinica Business Brief: China purchases a record 1.36 million metric tons of corn from the United States; according to China’s General Administration of Customs, exports rose by 32.3% year-on-year in April; and the Sinopharm vaccine receives approval for emergency use by the World Health Organization.

    In addition, we speak with Caixin Global podcast producer Nandini Venkata about the potential delisting of Chinese telecommunications companies from American stock exchanges.

    • 12 min

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5
39 Ratings

39 Ratings

Fuzzy Socks ,

Smirk

I can’t stand this guy Doug. His smirk permeates through his voice over the air. Smfh.

Sir Sugar ,

Fact check

Spartanburg and its BMW factory are in SOUTH Carolina 😊

Ghoast_of_ZhaoZiyang1989 ,

Kaiser is a CCP Apologists

Kaiser Kuo is an apologist for the Communist Party for the following reasons.

Firstly, he tends to promote a theme that we should have empathy for the Chinese people based on their brutal history of imperialism and self inflicted wounds, which I think many people can agree with at first glance, even myself. However, implicit in this claim is if you advocate human rights for the Chinese people, regardless of your political orientation, you do not have empathy for them and are engaging in cultural imperialism.

On the contrary, promoting democratization and human rights for China is a fundamental aspect of having empathy for the Chinese people, especially because it’s what most of them want. According a survey conducted by prominent sinologists called ‘How East Asians View Democracy’, 72.3 percent of the Chinese public polled said they believed that democracy is "desirable for our country now," and 67 percent said that democracy is "suitable for our country now.” And, even for those Chinese who oppose democratization, it would be ridiculous not to attempt to persuade them otherwise because it would improve their quality of life, especially in regards to labor rights. In regards to “cultural imperialism”, it’s not like McDonalds and Cocacola warships parked off the coast of Canton and started another Opium War. It was Deng Xiaoping et. al.’s decision to open up China and expose their population to new ideas the developed world had to offer. It is apologetic to ignore the aforementioned points because it legitimizes the horrible things the Communist Party does against the better interests of their populace.

Secondly, on his associated Facebook page, he routinely allows the political views of many indoctrinated mainland Chinese and their sympathizers to take precedence over anyone who promotes human rights. It’s ok with him if a mainland Chinese person advocates that the South China Sea belongs to China. However, those who argue for democratization and human rights are barraged with condescending remarks about not having empathy and engaging in cultural imperialism. They are often not given space to fully argue their point and are gaslighted and cursed at.

Thirdly, in direct conversations with Kaiser, he has claimed that well documented human rights abuses happening in Xinjiang, Tibet, Hong Kong, and on the mainland are hyperbole in western media, along with how China is constantly threatening Taiwan with military invasion. He has also mentioned that the Communist Party’s degradation of Hong Kong’s One Country, Two Systems policy does not matter to him. This perspective is bewildering considering it’s nearly impossible to get accurate news about these topics in mainland China, with outside sources being the only option. How someone could not care about Hong Kong being absorbed into the mainland is unsettling.

Finally, underlying every one of the aforementioned points is a degree of racism towards those who are non Han-Chinese and especially white. Used within the context of Kaiser et. al., the term “cultural imperialism” implies an action that only white westerners do under the guise of democratization. Apparently, the multiple times China imperialized its neighbors throughout history, the tributary system, the annexation of periphery regions, threatening Taiwan with invasion, building islands in the South China Sea, and concentration camps in Xinjiang do not count. The concept that a white person may have a compelling argument for why China should democratize and have human rights does not seem conceivable them. Kaiser has never experienced China as someone who is not ethnically Chinese, so he has never felt the the full burden of institutional racism taking place against non Han-Chinese under the regime, thus limiting his perspective.

In conclusion, Kaiser should realize that promoting human rights for China is a fundamental aspect of having empathy for the Chinese people and to ignore this is being apologetic for the CCP. He should realize that the company he keeps is a reflection of who he is and, so far, it’s not good company if human rights is what he truly values. He should also develop his media literacy skills. I hope his racism will end. I say this as someone who worked and lived in developing mainland China for almost ten years, has Chinese family, is literate in the Chinese language, is well educated in the social sciences, is a secular anti-imperialist democratic socialist, and identify in part as Chinese.

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