100 episodes

The Chills at Will Podcast is a celebration of the visceral beauty of literature. This beauty will be examined through close reads of phrases and lines and passages from fiction and nonfiction that thrills the reader, so much so that he wants to read again and again to replicate that thrill. Each episode will focus on a different theme, such as "The Power of Flashback," "Understatement," "Cats in the Cradle," and "Chills at Will: Origin Story."

The Chills at Will Podcast chillsatwillpodcast

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 63 Ratings

The Chills at Will Podcast is a celebration of the visceral beauty of literature. This beauty will be examined through close reads of phrases and lines and passages from fiction and nonfiction that thrills the reader, so much so that he wants to read again and again to replicate that thrill. Each episode will focus on a different theme, such as "The Power of Flashback," "Understatement," "Cats in the Cradle," and "Chills at Will: Origin Story."

    Episode 231-April 13, 2024 Live Event to Launch Jose Vadi's Chipped, a reflective, creative, subtly brilliant essay collection

    Episode 231-April 13, 2024 Live Event to Launch Jose Vadi's Chipped, a reflective, creative, subtly brilliant essay collection

    Notes and Links to José Vadi’s Work
     
       For Episode 231, Pete welcomes José Vadi, in Pete’s first in-store, live interview, as José launches his essay collection at Capital Books on K in Sacramento. It was a blast, due to José’s reflective, thoughtful, and witty answers, and the event featured great questions from the audience.
     
     
       José Vadi is an award-winning essayist, poet, playwright and film producer. He is the author of Inter State: Essays from California and Chipped: Writing from a Skateboarder’s Lens.
       His work has been featured by the Paris Review, The Atlantic, the PBS NewsHour, the San Francisco Chronicle, Free Skate Magazine, Quartersnacks, Alta Journal of California, and the Yale Review.

    Buy Chipped: Writing from a Skateboarder's Lense
     
     
    Los Angeles Times Review for Chipped: Writing from a Skateboarder's Lens
     
    Chipped Book Tour Details
     
    Jose's Website

    At about 2:30, José talks about his book tour and initial days of publishing
    At about 4:15, José talks about his mindset as the book comes out and the initial feedback he’s gotten, as well
    At about 7:00, José responds to Pete’s questions about perspective and how he looks back at what he has written, particularly after having moved a few times
    At about 9:15, José shouts out great Sacramento skate spots
    At about 10:15, Jsoe talks about making his book about skateboarding “accessible” to non-skaters also
    At about 11:45, José, freshly-hydrated, reads the book’s titular essay
    At about 16:45, José’s reading leads to a discussion of the quote from the book “documentation is domination” from Ed Templeton, and José discusses the power of one’s board as an “extensión of [a person]”
    At about 18:55, The two compare the destroyed boards with the raggedy basketball, and José alludes to Hanif Abdurraqib’s writing
    At about 21:05, José talks about the adage from the book of “Time is a skater’s worst enemy” and attendant ideas of aging and obsession and pride
    At about 23:20, José narrates and explores his essay about a big injury on the night on which Jake Phelps died, and José responds to Pete’s questions about “respecting the game [skating]” and its relation to injuries
    At about 28:30, José and Pete discuss the frenzied and wonderful “Wild and Crazy” essay
    At about 31:15, José discusses the phenomenon of skate videos and the DIY documentation of the 90s and early 2000s
    At about 34:00, Pete asks José about what music he most identifies with his own skating history 
    At about 35:15, José discusses musical connections with his parents that came from the music scene in skating 
    At about 37:50, Pete asks José to discuss how he looked at the thrills and dangers of skateboarding and being “policed” by those in power as an adolescent
    At about 40:05, José replies to Pete’s wondering about José’s view of progressive and inclusive cultures within skateboarding, especially with regards to contrasting the “old days” and more recent times
    At about 42:20, Pete and José fanboy about Sun Ra-Pete regarding José’s brilliant essay about Sun Ra’s style and music and skateboarding, and José about Sun Ra’s prodigious brilliance 
    At about 44:00, Pete wonders about the process for José in creating Sun Ra as an imagined skateboarder in the essay
    At about 45:10, Pete and José discuss José’s time with Youth Speaks, and Pete uses one scene as a metaphor for José’s stellar writing
    At about 47:35, Pete highlights a story involving “power” as indicative of José’s successful writing style, and José tells an incredible story about losing the mic and then hugging Michael Franti
    At about 49:20, “Never meet your heroes” is discussed in relation to Ed Templeton and his support for José and skating as a whole, as well as Ed’s major injury; José discusses how Ed’s example gave José agency to write and create and skate 
    At about 53:10-Lazer Round! Kings, Warriors, Lakers?

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Episode 230 with Chelsea T. Hicks, Author of the Story Collection, A Calm & Normal Heart, Revitalizer and Student of the Osage Language, and Crafter of Poetic, Timely, and Timeless Stories

    Episode 230 with Chelsea T. Hicks, Author of the Story Collection, A Calm & Normal Heart, Revitalizer and Student of the Osage Language, and Crafter of Poetic, Timely, and Timeless Stories

    Notes and Links to Chelsea Hicks’ Work
     
       For Episode 230, Pete welcomes Chelsea Hicks, and the two discuss, among other topics, her language journey and how she came to study and work to help revitalize the Osage language, her feelings about being named “5 Under 35,” mentors and inspirations like Louise Erdrich and N. Scott Momaday, her writing as alternately “MFA-ish” and experimental, her nuanced view of “The Movie,” and salient themes from her story collection, including identity, celebrations and traumas, rematriation, agency, and family ties. 
     
       Chelsea T. Hicks is a Wazhazhe writer with an MA from UC Davis and an MFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts. Her writing has been published in The Paris Review, Poetry, McSweeney’s, and elsewhere. She was selected as a 5 Under 35 honoree by Louise Erdrich for the National Book Award, and her first book, A Calm and Normal Heart, was longlisted for the PEN America Robert W. Bingham Prize.

    Buy A Calm and Normal Heart: Stories
     
     
    Review of A Calm and Normal Heart in The Southern Review of Books

    At about 1:30, Chelsea gives kudos to mentors at UCDavis for her MA
    At about 2:25, Chelsea discusses her mindset and joy in being named one of the “5 Under 35” by Louise Erdrich for the National Book Foundation  
    At about 7:15, Chelsea talks about her childhood relationship with language, and she provides a personal language background and a historical context for the loss and revitalization of the Osage language
    At about 11:55, Chelsea shouts out Inés Hernández-Ávila and a language challenge through Ines’ connections in Oaxaca
    At about 14:50, Chelsea gives background on some teaching and mentoring and promoting of language acceleration that she’s done 
    At about 17:40-20:10, Chelsea responds to Pete’s question about innate connections to her Osage culture, particularly with regard to the language 
    At about 20:35, Chelsea provides interesting information about the Osage language, including “masculine” and “feminine” ways of speaking and gendered pronouns
    At about 22:40, The two discuss a cool phrase regarding the moon in Wažáže ie
    At about 23:50, The two commiserate over linguistics classes
    At about 24:45, Chelsea gives background on early favorite books and her literary journey, as well as how Peter Pan, other books, and her classmates and friends shone light on the way she and others in society saw her Native culture
    At about 28:35, Chelsea traces her path as a writer, including early, self-guided poetry 
    At about 30:25, Chelsea describes an “opening of [her] eyes” in reading N. Scott Momaday
    At about 32:30, Chelsea references some particular insights of Momdaday from House of Dawn and gives background on a Paris Review article she wrote about his work; Chelsea discusses “rematriation” and land care, while discussing important work by Natalie Diaz and Sogorea Te’ Land Trust
    At about 35:50, Pete and Chelsea discuss the book’s introduction and including indigenous language in the book, especially the titles; Pete shouts out a dynamic 
    At about 37:30, Chelsea responds to Pete’s question about connections in the collection’s opening story to Killers of The Flower Moon and how she sees the movie
    At about 43:10, Pete lays out some salient themes and plotlines covered in the story collection
    At about 44:25, Chelsea wants to clarify how her work comes off- “direct” and “experimental,” etc.
    At about 46:25, Chelsea talks about her writing philosophy, craft, love of poetry, and future academic work
    At about 47:30, Pete enumerates some creative methods used by Chelsea
    At about 49:50, Pete cites an important and poignant quote from the book
     
     
        You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I’m @chillsatwillpodcast, or o

    • 55 min
    Episode 229 with Will Sommer, Author of Trust the Plan: The Rise of QAnon and the Conspiracy That Reshaped America, and Keen and Thorough Chronicler of the QAnon Movement Through The Washington Post

    Episode 229 with Will Sommer, Author of Trust the Plan: The Rise of QAnon and the Conspiracy That Reshaped America, and Keen and Thorough Chronicler of the QAnon Movement Through The Washington Post

    Notes and Links to Will Sommer’s Work
     
       For Episode 229, Pete welcomes Will Sommers, and the two discuss, among other topics, his early relationship with the written word, his all-encompassing relationships with and love for student journalism, formative times at Georgetown, his lifelong interest in conservative media, and salient themes in his book, including the growth of QAnon through 4chan and 8chan and Trump’s rise to power, QAnon’s pop culture connections, questions of true believers and grifters in QAnon, key personalities in the movement, as well as possible remedies for loosening the hold QAnon has on some many people featured in his book.
     
         Will Sommer covers right-wing media, political radicalization and right-wing conspiracy theories in the United States. His 2023 book is Trust the Plan: The Rise of QAnon and the Conspiracy That Reshaped América. He is also featured as an expert on QAnon in HBO's Q: Into the Storm. He has previously written for The Daily Beast, and now works as a media reporter for The Washington Post. 

    Buy Trust the Plan: The Rise of QAnon and the Conspiracy That Unhinged America
     
     
    Will's Wikipedia Page
     
    Review of Trust the Plan in The New York Times
     
    Review of Trust the Plan in The Guardian

    Will Discusses his Book with Terri Gross on NPR’s Fresh Air

    At about 1:50, Will gives background on the inspiration for QAnon’s motto, derived from the movie White Squall
    At about 3:20, Will talks about being “bookish and into writing,” unspooling stories,” high school and college newspapers, and his early love for journalism
    At about 6:25, Will talks about inspiring and formative texts and writers, including Patrick Radden Keefe, Janet Malcolm, Charles Bowden, and Mike Sager
    At about 10:00, Pete shouts out Mark Arax and a particularly unforgettable piece
    At about 10:50, Will responds to Pete’s questions about his upbringing in Texas and Will expounds upon his appetite for conservative media and trends and feuds that he has observed over the years
    At about 14:10, Will traces his career journey from Georgetown to The Patch and on
    At about 17:20, Pete and Will discuss the book’s Introduction, set during the January 6 rallies and riots; Will expounds upon his mindset during the day, the incredible things he heard rioters say, and the importance of his attendance for his research 
    At about 21:00, Pete asks about QAnon’s beginnings, its placement in the Trump presidency, and Will gives background on Q’s connections to 4chan
    At about 24:05, Will gives a summary of QAnon’s beliefs and the idea of “The Storm”
    At about 24:45, Will provides history on “Pizzagate” and its early connections to QAnon
    At about 26:05, Will replies to Pete’s questions about QAnon representation at the January 6 rally, and Pete cites a telling quote from the book by Will at the January 6 rally
    At about 29:00, Will gives examples of feedback and conversation with QAnon believers, as well as many of their mindsets/motivations and targets for their anger/frustrations 
    At about 30:20, Pete cites Chapter One’s “Easter eggs” for QAnon, and Will talks about “Q Proofs” and other indicators, according to the believers 
    At about 32:10, Will points to a definition of “conspiracy theory” from the book and connects to real-life theories passed on by QAnon believers 
    At about 33:05, Will puts into perspectives some statistics about QAnon tenets and American beliefs in these, as measured by polls from the last few years
    At about 35:55, Will gives some history of 4chan and more connections to QAnon 
    At about 38:15, Will opines on Trump’s ignorance of QAnon versus his manipulating and using their support for him
    At about 41:25, Pete asks Will about his views on people who believe in QAnon tenets and about those who promote QAnon
    At about 44:00. Pete traces social media’s connections to QAnon and Will describes how Covid led to a resurgence of QAnon
    At about 46:00-QAnon A

    • 55 min
    Episode 228 with Jennifer Croft, Author of The Extinction of Irena Rey and Award-Winning Translator, and Master of Worldbuilding, Highly-Allegorical Yet Masterfully-Plotted Fiction, and Nuance

    Episode 228 with Jennifer Croft, Author of The Extinction of Irena Rey and Award-Winning Translator, and Master of Worldbuilding, Highly-Allegorical Yet Masterfully-Plotted Fiction, and Nuance

    Notes and Links to Jennifer Croft’s Work
     
     
       For Episode 228, Pete welcomes Jennifer Croft, and the two discuss, among other topics, her early relationship with words and geography and later, multilingualism, formative colleagues and teachers who guided and inspired her love of languages and literary translation, her serendipitous path to focusing on Polish and Spanish translations, connections between cultural nuances and translation, and literal and allegorical signposts in her book, including climate change and celebrity “brands,” the fluidity of translation, the relationships between translators and original writing, the intriguing phenomenon that is amadou, and time and perspective and their connections to translation. 

       Jennifer Croft won a 2022 Guggenheim Fellowship for her novel The Extinction of Irena Rey, the 2020 William Saroyan International Prize for Writing for her illustrated memoir Homesick, and the 2018 International Booker Prize for her translation of Olga Tokarczuk’s Flights. A two-time National Book Award–honoree, Croft is Presidential Professor of English & Creative Writing at the University of Tulsa. 

    Buy The Extinction of Irena Rey
     
     
    Jennifer's Wikipedia Page
     
    Review of The Extinction of Irena Rey in The New York Times
     
    Jennifer Discusses her Book with Scott Simon on NPR’s Weekend Edition

    At about 2:40, Jennifer discusses the feedback she’s gotten, and the overall experience that has governed the weeks since the book’s March 6 publication  
    At about 3:40, Shout out to the coolest envelope ever, and to Emily Fishman at Bloomsbury Publishing
    At about 4:20, Jennifer talks about the influences that led to her curiosity about reading and geography and knowledge 
    At about 5:55, Jennifer lays out the books that she was reading in her childhood, and talks about books and writing as ways of “traveling”
    At about 8:15, Jennifer talks about inspirations from her reading, including working with Yevgeny Yevtushenko
    At about 10:15, Jennifer expounds upon her journey in learning new languages, and how learning Spanish and Polish were connected
    At about 13:15, Jennifer and Pete talk about the greatness of Jorge Luis Borges, and Pete shouts out the unforgettable “The Gospel According to Mark”
    At about 14:15, Jennifer charts what makes her MFA in Literary Translation different than translation on its own
    At about 15:30, Jennifer recounts her experiences in Poland when she was there during the time of Pope John Paul II’s death
    At about 17:35, Jennifer talks about the art of translation and how she has evolved in her craft over the years
    At about 20:45, Pete uses a Marquez translation as an example of a seemingly-absurd rendering, while Jennifer provides a balanced view of translation challenges 
    At about 22:30, Pete cites some of the gushing blurbs for the book and asks Jennifer about seeds for the book; she cites a genesis in a nonfiction idea 
    At about 28:15, Pete reads a plot summary from the book jacket/promotional materials 
    At about 29:10, Pete and Jennifer discuss the book’s two narrators-Emilia the writer, and Alexis, her English translator-and their conflicts and devolutions 
    At about 33:40, Pete remarks on the strategic and highly-successful structure of the book
    At about 34:20, Jennifer responds to Pete’s questions about her use of images throughout the book
    At about 37:30, Jennifer discusses the “dishonest[y] of subjectivity” in discussing translation and the author/translator’s role in the writing
    At about 38:20, Pete reads a few key lines from the book, including the powerful opening lines and gives some exposition of the book
    At about 40:50, Jennifer responds to Pete’s questions about the importance of amadou in the book, and she expands on its many uses and history
    At about 45:35, Jennifer expounds on ideas of the “mother tongue” as posited in the book, and uses examples from her own life to further reflect
    At about 48:00, Incredibl

    • 1 hr 12 min
    Episode 227 with Gina Chung, Author of Green Frog, a Dazzling Collection of Poignant, Offbeat, Chillingly-Realistic and Fantastical Stories

    Episode 227 with Gina Chung, Author of Green Frog, a Dazzling Collection of Poignant, Offbeat, Chillingly-Realistic and Fantastical Stories

    Notes and Links to Gina Chung’s Work
     
       For Episode 227, Pete welcomes Gina Chung, and the two discuss, among other topics, The Babysitters Club’s lasting impact, her early relationship with words and bilingualism, finding great storytelling in her parents’ example and in folktales and animal myths, her master touch with disparate stories and characters, and salient topics from the story collection like parental/child relationships and expectations, grief and memory, and one’s connection with her forebears. 
     
    Gina Chung is a Korean American writer from New Jersey currently living in New York City. She is the author of the novel SEA CHANGE (Vintage, March 28, 2023; Picador, April 13, 2023 in the Commonwealth and in the UK on August 10, 2023), which was longlisted for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize, an Asian/Pacific American Award for Adult Fiction Honor, a 2023 B&N Discover Pick, and a New York Times Most Anticipated Book, and the short story collection GREEN FROG (Vintage, March 12, 2024; out in the UK/Commonwealth from Picador on June 6, 2024). A recipient of the Pushcart Prize, she is a 2021-2022 Center for Fiction/Susan Kamil Emerging Writer Fellow and holds an MFA in fiction from The New School's Creative Writing Program and a BA in literary studies from Williams College. Her work appears or is forthcoming in One Story, BOMB, The Kenyon Review, Literary Hub, Catapult, Electric Literature, Gulf Coast, Indiana Review, Idaho Review, The Rumpus, Pleiades, and F(r)iction, among others.
     
    Buy Green Frog
     
     
    Gina's Website
     
    Review of Green Frog-Kirkus

    At about 2:35, Gina shouts places to buy her book, Green Frog, and about her feelings a few weeks before the book’s release
    At about 4:25, Gina recounts what she’s heard from early readers of her collection
    At about 6:05, Gina responds to Pete’s questions about storytellers in her life and her early language and reading life
    At about 10:10, Gina talks about her early reading delights
    At about 12:10, Babysitters Club love!
    At about 13:15, Gina talks about her writing journey and her confidence peaks and valleys
    At about 16:40, Gina shouts out “amazing” contemporary writers, such as Rebecca K. Riley and Jiaming Tang 
    At about 18:40-21:25, Gina talks about seeds for her collection and gives background on the title story and the “Green Frog” folktale
    At about 21:25-22:40, Gina talks about daily and informal observation that inspired “Mantis” and other stories in the collection
    At about 24:40, Gina speaks to her rationale and the background in picking the Emily Jungmin Yoon-inspired epigraph
    At about 26:25, Pete and Gina discuss “How to Eat Your Own Heart,” the collection’s first story, including profound quotes (27:10-30:20)
    At about 31:00, Gina speaks to ideas of regeneration in the above story and gives some background on how the story came from a Zoom “Knife Skills” course
    At about 34:25, The two further discuss the title story of the collection 
    At about 36:20, Pete asks Gina about the meanings of “here” in the title story 
    At about 39:30, Themes of community in “The Fruits of Sin” are discussed 
    At about 40:35, Belief is discussed in conjunc
    At about 41:15, Grief and the importance of rabbits in Korean culture and beyond are discussed in connection to a moving story from the collection
    At about 43:40, Pete quotes an important and universal passage as he and Gina talk about memory’s throughline in the collection; the two ruminate on connections to The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
    At about 50:20, Gina reflects on a moving story that deals with memory and technology
    At about 54:00, The two talk about mother-daughter and parent-child relationships in the collection
    At about 57:40, Pete quotes a poignant and skillfully crafted passage
    At about 59:15, Gina gives a ballpark for how long of a range the stories were written in and throughlines that she has identified in her collection 
    At about 1:03:00,

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Episode 226 with Priscilla Gilman, Author of The Critic's Daughter and Skilled and Thoughtful Chronicler of the Universal and the Intimately Personal

    Episode 226 with Priscilla Gilman, Author of The Critic's Daughter and Skilled and Thoughtful Chronicler of the Universal and the Intimately Personal

    Notes and Links to Priscilla Gilman’s Work
     
       For Episode 226, Pete welcomes Priscilla Gilman, and the two discuss, among other topics, her famous and accomplished parents, and the perks and drawbacks that came with running in circles with dynamic writers and creatives, her voracious appetite for art and media and books, formational and informative works of art, books and not, her father’s wonderful work, belief in the sanctity of childhood, grief and its manifestations, the ways in which her relationships were nurturing and not, and how she managed to write lovingly and honestly about such a towering and beloved figure.
     
       Priscilla Gilman is the author of the memoir, The Anti-Romantic Child, and a former professor of English literature at Yale University and Vassar College. The Anti-Romantic Child received starred reviews in Publishers Weekly and Booklist, was selected as one the Best Books of 2011 by the Leonard Lopate Show and The Chicago Tribune, and was one of five nominees for a Books for a Better Life Award for Best First Book. Gilman’s writing has appeared in the New York Times, O, the Oprah Magazine, and elsewhere. She lives in New York City.
     
     
    Buy The Critic's Daughter: A Memoir
     
    Priscilla's Wikipedia Page
     
    WYNC Episode: "The Critic's Daughter' Explores the Marriage of Lynn Nesbit and Richard Gilman" 
     
    New York Times Review of The Critic’s Daughter

    At about 2:00, Priscilla shouts out bookstores at which to buy her book and book events 
    At about 3:00, Pete and Priscilla fanboy and fangirl about Episode 42 guest Edoardo Ballerini
    At about 5:00, Priscila talks about early reading, texts, and authors who “enraptured” her
    At about 7:05, Priscilla and Pete talk about how her reading and writing life was shaped by her literary and artistic parents, Richard Gilman and Lynn Nesbit 
    At about 10:50, Priscilla responds to Pete’s questions about what it has been like to know some many literary and artistic giants on a personal level
    At about 15:30, Priscilla speaks to early writing and reading and her path to academia and literature, including the wonderful role played by Brearley High School  
    At about 19:10, Priscilla references some of many contemporary writers like Sarah Watters,  Ishiguro, Louise Erdrich, Strout, Leslie Jamison, Claire Keegan, Rachel Cusk, Lore Siegal, and Yaa Gaasi, who inspire and thrill her
    At about 22:55, Pete and Priscilla discuss the book’s epigraphs and their significances 
    At about 28:10, The two geek out about Priscilla’s talented sister
    At about 28:40, Pete wonders about 
    At about 32:20, Shaina Taub is shouted out, as Priscilla talks about a cool collaboration with her son and his high school drama
    At about 33:05, Pete points out an interesting opening excerpt that compares and contrasts Priscilla’s father and the NYC oeuvre he lived in; Priscilla also discusses the book’s universality
    At about 35:30, Priscilla discusses the old days of being able to live comfortably as an artist/critic and the book as a sort of lament for long-gone neighborhoods
    At about 37:45, Priscilla compliments Joan Didion as a wonderful, “kind, thoughtful sweetheart and incredible genius”
    At about 38:45, The two discuss ideas of public intellectuals and Wolff’s Old School
    At about 40:20, Pete asks Priscilla about being true to her father and to herself in writing her book-the two refer to a memorable George Bernard Shaw quote
    At about 44:15, Priscilla alludes to an often-quoted line from her book that speaks to ideas of “moving on” and grief
    At about 45:10, The two further discuss Richard Gilman’s public life and fame
    At about 48:00, Pete cites a disappointing workshop experience in connecting to a powerful and poignant story that Priscilla relates-her first memory-that is a microcosm of so much in her and her father’s lives
    At about 50:40, The two discuss how Richard Gilman “believed in childhood” 
    At about 54:30, Pete references excerpts about Prisc

    • 1 hr 6 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
63 Ratings

63 Ratings

EthanCCh ,

Great literary interviews

Chills at Will is one of my favorite sources for writer interviews. Pete has a great way of coming at his conversations from lots of different angles, opening up interesting insights and keeping the interviews lively. A great listen for readers, writers, and artists of all sorts.

Andrew_Porter ,

Outstanding literary podcast!

I was a huge fan of the Chills at Will podcast long before I was lucky enough to be guest on it, and I remain an avid listener! I love the laid back vibe of the show and Pete’s casual demeanor and excellent questions. As a listener, you really feel like you know the guests and their work by the end of each interview, and, as a guest, I was grateful for the detailed and thoughtful questions. Pete reads the books very closely and carefully, you can tell this as an author, and that’s one of the reasons the interviews are so insightful. Truly one of the best literary podcasts out there!

elderberry11 ,

Such thoughtful questions!

I was lucky enough to be a guest on Pete’s podcast earlier this year and he is such a thoughtful interviewer. He reads books with such care and attention, and i always learn something from the conversations I listen to. Recommend for writers and readers!

Top Podcasts In Arts

Fresh Air
NPR
The Moth
The Moth
99% Invisible
Roman Mars
McCartney: A Life in Lyrics
iHeartPodcasts and Pushkin Industries
Fantasy Fangirls
Fantasy Fangirls
Snap Judgment Presents: Spooked
Snap Judgment