12 min

The Crucial Distinction Between Following Up vs. Following Through Breakthrough Babe Podcast

    • Entrepreneurship

Picture this: You’ve just had a great discovery call with your prospective customer. They weren’t quite ready to buy in yet, and you know you’ll need to check-in with them soon to find out their ultimate decision. You write yourself a note to follow-up, cringing at the thought, because following up just always feels so… icky. 
 
If you never feel certain about how to follow-up, when to follow-up, and the ways to follow-up that don’t seem so damn salesy, then this post is for you. 
 
In today’s new post, I’m teaching you how you can make the subtle, yet powerful swap to begin following through with your customers, rather than following up, so you can gain momentum in your sales process and close more deals - all without coming across as sleazy, salesy, or annoying. 
 
Read on to discover how to follow through in ways that actually deepen your connection with your customers rather than pushing them away. 



Finally closing a deal over 1 year in the making
 
Would you like to celebrate with me? I’m so freaking excited because I just closed a deal that I’ve been working on since April 1st of 2021. Yes, you read that right - 2021. 
 
While the deal closed for a smaller amount than I had originally anticipated, it is still a five figure monthly sum for numerous months on a trial basis. And believe me - we are going to crush this trial by showing off the impact we can create, and I’m certain we will get hired on a long term basis. So that's pretty damn awesome. 
 
But here’s the thing - had I not stuck around in the follow up, I never would have gotten this deal. It would likely have gone to someone else, or it would have fallen by the wayside. This deal closed because of how I followed through for over a year. 






How does follow-up transpire in your business deals?
 
How often do you typically follow up with a prospective customer? How do you feel when you’re doing it?
 
If you’re like the grand majority of my clients, you probably tend to follow up a couple of times and if you don’t hear back from the prospective customer, you give up and move on to your next lead. 
 
Maybe following up makes you feel sleazy and you avoid it as much as you can. In the traditional sense, following up is basically calling someone and asking, “Can I have your money yet?” And that just seems gross, like you’re nagging. No one wants to talk to that person, and no one wants to BE that person. 
 
Here's an important lesson that I learned in tennis. If I just hit the ball, then stop my swing after I hit the ball, it doesn't always go where I want it to go. It doesn't always set you up for success on the next shot if you just hit the ball and then watch it. But when you hit the ball and follow through with your racket and swing all the way (which, by the way, is a lot harder), your odds of landing the ball exactly where you had intended to increase. Why? It’s all because of that one thing: the follow through. Following through helps ensure that the ball is going to maintain its momentum through the point of contact. How interesting is that? 



The difference between following up vs. following through
 
When your customer doesn't buy on the phone during your discovery call (because many customers aren't ready to pull the trigger while they're on the phone), it's important that you are able to nurture them and follow through after the fact. 
 
But I don’t want you to merely follow up anymore. You’re not going to make calls or emails where you say, “Hi! I’m just following up…” or “I’m just checking in!” The sole purpose of that is asking for money, for a signed deal. And that turns people off and doesn’t lead to consistently closed deals. 
 
Instead, you’re going to start following through. What’s the difference? Well, when you’re following through, you’re doing so strategically to gain momentum and speed up the process toward

Picture this: You’ve just had a great discovery call with your prospective customer. They weren’t quite ready to buy in yet, and you know you’ll need to check-in with them soon to find out their ultimate decision. You write yourself a note to follow-up, cringing at the thought, because following up just always feels so… icky. 
 
If you never feel certain about how to follow-up, when to follow-up, and the ways to follow-up that don’t seem so damn salesy, then this post is for you. 
 
In today’s new post, I’m teaching you how you can make the subtle, yet powerful swap to begin following through with your customers, rather than following up, so you can gain momentum in your sales process and close more deals - all without coming across as sleazy, salesy, or annoying. 
 
Read on to discover how to follow through in ways that actually deepen your connection with your customers rather than pushing them away. 



Finally closing a deal over 1 year in the making
 
Would you like to celebrate with me? I’m so freaking excited because I just closed a deal that I’ve been working on since April 1st of 2021. Yes, you read that right - 2021. 
 
While the deal closed for a smaller amount than I had originally anticipated, it is still a five figure monthly sum for numerous months on a trial basis. And believe me - we are going to crush this trial by showing off the impact we can create, and I’m certain we will get hired on a long term basis. So that's pretty damn awesome. 
 
But here’s the thing - had I not stuck around in the follow up, I never would have gotten this deal. It would likely have gone to someone else, or it would have fallen by the wayside. This deal closed because of how I followed through for over a year. 






How does follow-up transpire in your business deals?
 
How often do you typically follow up with a prospective customer? How do you feel when you’re doing it?
 
If you’re like the grand majority of my clients, you probably tend to follow up a couple of times and if you don’t hear back from the prospective customer, you give up and move on to your next lead. 
 
Maybe following up makes you feel sleazy and you avoid it as much as you can. In the traditional sense, following up is basically calling someone and asking, “Can I have your money yet?” And that just seems gross, like you’re nagging. No one wants to talk to that person, and no one wants to BE that person. 
 
Here's an important lesson that I learned in tennis. If I just hit the ball, then stop my swing after I hit the ball, it doesn't always go where I want it to go. It doesn't always set you up for success on the next shot if you just hit the ball and then watch it. But when you hit the ball and follow through with your racket and swing all the way (which, by the way, is a lot harder), your odds of landing the ball exactly where you had intended to increase. Why? It’s all because of that one thing: the follow through. Following through helps ensure that the ball is going to maintain its momentum through the point of contact. How interesting is that? 



The difference between following up vs. following through
 
When your customer doesn't buy on the phone during your discovery call (because many customers aren't ready to pull the trigger while they're on the phone), it's important that you are able to nurture them and follow through after the fact. 
 
But I don’t want you to merely follow up anymore. You’re not going to make calls or emails where you say, “Hi! I’m just following up…” or “I’m just checking in!” The sole purpose of that is asking for money, for a signed deal. And that turns people off and doesn’t lead to consistently closed deals. 
 
Instead, you’re going to start following through. What’s the difference? Well, when you’re following through, you’re doing so strategically to gain momentum and speed up the process toward

12 min