1,388 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • News
    • 4.4 • 82.2K Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    The Supreme Court Considers the Future of Roe

    The Supreme Court Considers the Future of Roe

    On Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard a case that was a frontal challenge to Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old decision that established a constitutional right to abortion.

    The case in front of the justices was about a Mississippi law that bans abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

    For the state to win, the court, which now has a conservative majority, would have to do real damage to the central tenet of the Roe ruling.

    We explore the arguments presented in this case and how the justices on either side of the political spectrum responded to them.

    • 25 min
    Amazon and the Labor Shortage

    Amazon and the Labor Shortage

    Amazon is constantly hiring. Data has shown that the company has had a turnover rate of about 150 percent a year.

    For the founder, Jeff Bezos, worker retention was not important, and the company built systems that didn’t require skilled workers or extensive training — it could hire and lose people all of the time.

    Amazon has been able to replenish its work force, but the pandemic has exposed the vulnerabilities of this approach.

    We explore what the labor shortage has meant for Amazon and the people who work there.

    Guest: Karen Weise, a technology correspondent, based in Seattle for The New York Times.

    • 26 min
    What We Know About the Omicron Variant

    What We Know About the Omicron Variant

    The story of the Omicron variant began a week ago, when researchers in southern Africa detected a version of the coronavirus that carried 50 mutations.

    When scientists look at coronavirus mutations, they worry about three things: Is the new variant more contagious? Is it going to cause people to get sicker? And how will the vaccines work against it?

    We explore when we will get the answers to these three questions, and look at the discovery of the variant and the international response to it.

    Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a reporter covering science and global health for The New York Times.

    • 20 min
    A Prosecutor’s Winning Strategy in the Ahmaud Arbery Case

    A Prosecutor’s Winning Strategy in the Ahmaud Arbery Case

    This episode contains strong language.

    Heading into deliberations in the trial of the three white men in Georgia accused of chasing down and killing Ahmaud Arbery, an unarmed Black man, it was not clear which way the jurors were leaning.

    In the end, the mostly white jury found all three men guilty of murder. We look at the prosecution’s decision not to make race a central tenet of their case, and how the verdict was reached.

    Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta.

    • 37 min
    The Farmers Revolt in India

    The Farmers Revolt in India

    After a landslide re-election in 2019, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s control over India seemed impossible to challenge.

    But a yearlong farmers’ protest against agricultural overhauls has done just that, forcing the Indian prime minister to back down.

    How did the protesters succeed?

    Guest: Emily Schmall, a South Asia correspondent for The New York Times.

    • 28 min
    Righting the Historical Wrong of the Claiborne Highway

    Righting the Historical Wrong of the Claiborne Highway

    In the 1950s and ’60s, the Tremé neighborhood of New Orleans, one of the oldest African-American neighborhoods in the United States, was a vibrant community.

    But the construction of the Claiborne Expressway in the 1960s gutted the area.

    The Biden administration has said that the trillion-dollar infrastructure package will address such historical wrongs.

    How might that be achieved?

    Guest: Audra D.S. Burch, a national correspondent for The New York Times.

    • 25 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
82.2K Ratings

82.2K Ratings

ndydandy826 ,

The podcast that got me listening to all other podcasts

Mr Barbaro is my favorite podcast host. I miss him when someone else hosts. He is the reason why I start every weekday with The Daily podcast. His shows are educational and I LOVE his speaking style and his sense of humor. I hope he stays for a long time!

Climate Mariah ,

Disappointed to Hear Ads from Fossil Fuel Companies

NYT, that’s unacceptable given your ClimateDesk and many efforts to report on the climate crisis and need to address it. Too bad, as this is a great podcast otherwise.

Fatikmedia ,

Omnicron feedback

Apoorva did a great job explaining the science behind the mutation however I was not pleased and disliked her comments on the vaccine and Africa, stating the continent as a whole having a lot of immunocompromised people. It felt as if she was asserting a stereotype as she further went into HIV, Malaria TB being strictly in all of Africa.This blanket statement further damages her argument, perpetuates Africa as being disease ridden and barbaric and reduces her credibility because Africa is so large. You can fit 4 United States in the whole continent! She failed to address the access to the vaccine when she stated how a lot of the continent isn't vaccinated. What was not stated was “why Arent they vaccinated? It’s not like Africans wake up and go to cvs to get a free vaccine. I would request the NYT get a scientist more knowledgeable from the continent, for credibility in this story and similar stories. Having the Africa correspondent would be wise. I hope this was helpful.

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