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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

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This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    The Field: The Shy Biden Voters Among Florida’s Seniors

    The Field: The Shy Biden Voters Among Florida’s Seniors

    Florida’s seniors played an important role in President Trump’s victory there in 2016. Older voters, who are mostly conservative, make up around 25 percent of the swing state’s electorate and turn out in astonishing numbers.

    They are also disproportionately affected by the pandemic, and polling suggests that Joe Biden is making inroads with Republican-leaning older voters.

    In Florida’s conservative retirement communities, however, the decision to switch from Mr. Trump can have consequences and many stay quiet for fear of reprisals.

    Some of these consequences are obvious: One resident who erected a sign in support of Mr. Biden woke up to “Trump” written in weedkiller on his lawn. Other effects are more personal, and more insidious.

    Today, Annie Brown, a senior audio producer at The Times, speaks to some of Florida’s seniors about their voting intentions — including one, Dave Niederkorn, who has turned his back on Mr. Trump and almost lost a close friend in the process.

    Guests: Annie Brown, a senior audio producer for The New York Times; and Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief of The Times, who covers Florida and Puerto Rico. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Older people are a crucial voting bloc in Florida. In a speech earlier this month, Joe Biden made his pitch to them.“If it’s here, it’s here” — how retirees in Florida’s Villages confronted the coronavirus in the summer. 

    • 40 Min.
    The Field: The Specter of Political Violence

    The Field: The Specter of Political Violence

    This episode contains strong language.

    With an election in which uncertainty may abound, concerns are swirling around the possibility of political violence. Experts and officials — including those charged with the security of polling stations and ballot counting facilities — have been taking extra precautions.

    Americans across the political spectrum appear to be preparing themselves for this possibility, too: Eight of the 10 biggest weeks for gun sales since the late 1990s took place since March this year. Many of those sales were to people buying guns for the first time.

    Today’s episode examines these anxieties from two perspectives.

    Andy Mills, a senior audio producer for The New York Times, speaks to patrons of gun stores in Washington State about their motivations and sits down with a first-time gun owner who relays his anxiety, ignited by the unrest and protests in Seattle over the summer.

    And Alix Spiegel, a senior audio editor for The Times, visits three women of color in North Carolina, one of whom says the scenes in Charlottesville, the killing of Black people at the hands of the police and the threat of white militias have encouraged her to shift her anti-gun stance. 

    Guests:  Andy Mills, a senior audio producer for The New York Times; Alix Spiegel, a senior audio editor for The Times; and Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Gun buyers say they are motivated by a new sense of instability that is pushing them to purchase weapons for the first time, or if they already have them, to buy more.

    • 48 Min.
    A Partisan Future for Local News?

    A Partisan Future for Local News?

    Local news in America has long been widely trusted, and widely seen as objective. But as traditional local papers struggle, there have been attempts across the political spectrum to create more partisan outlets.

    Few can have been as ambitious or widespread as the nationwide network of 1,300 websites and newspapers run by Brian Timpone, a television reporter turned internet entrepreneur.

    He has said that he sees local news as a means of preserving American civil discourse. But a Times investigation has found that Republican operatives and public relations firms have been paying for articles in his outlets and intimately dictating the editorial direction of stories.Today, we speak to the Times journalists behind the investigation.

    Guests: Davey Alba, a technology reporter for The New York Times covering online misinformation and its global harms; and Jack Nicas, who covers technology for The Times from San Francisco. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Here’s the full investigation into a nationwide operation of 1,300 local sites that publishes coverage ordered up by Republican groups and corporate P.R. firms.

    • 34 Min.
    The Shadow of the 2000 Election

    The Shadow of the 2000 Election

    What does the specter of the 2000 election mean for the upcoming election? The race between George W. Bush and Al Gore that year turned on the result in Florida, where the vote was incredibly close and mired in balloting issues. After initially conceding, Mr. Gore, the Democratic nominee, contested the count.

    What followed was a flurry of court cases, recounts, partisan fury and confusion. It would be months until — after a Supreme Court decision — Mr. Bush would become the 43rd president of the United States.

    The confrontation held political lessons for both sides. Lessons that could be put to the test next week in an election likely to be shrouded in uncertainty: The pandemic, the volume of mail-in voters and questions around mail delivery could result in legal disputes.

    Today, we take a look back at the contest between Mr. Gore and Mr. Bush.

    Guest: Jim Rutenberg, a writer-at-large for The New York Times and The Times Magazine. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: A number of legal battles over voting rights are in the pipeline. Any ruling could resonate nationwide.Elections supervisors say they have learned the hard lessons of the 2000 presidential recount and other messes. But challenges are already apparent.

    • 33 Min.
    The Field: Why Suburban Women Changed Their Minds

    The Field: Why Suburban Women Changed Their Minds

    In America’s increasingly divided political landscape, it can be hard to imagine almost any voter switching sides. One demographic group has provided plenty of exceptions: white suburban women.

    In the past four years, the group has turned away from the president in astonishing numbers. And many of them are organizing — Red, Wine and Blue is a group made up of suburban women from Ohio hoping to swing the election for Joe Biden. The organization draws on women who voted for the president and third parties in 2016, as well as existing Democratic voters.

    In today’s episode, Lisa Lerer, who covers campaigns, elections and political power for The New York Times, speaks to white suburban women on the ground in Ohio and explores their shifting allegiances and values.

    Guest: Lisa Lerer, a reporter for The New York Times covering campaigns, elections and political power.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: The white suburban voters the president needs to carve a path to victory have turned away from him, often for deeply personal reasons.

    • 36 Min.
    The Sunday Read: 'My Mustache, My Self'

    The Sunday Read: 'My Mustache, My Self'

    During months of pandemic isolation, Wesley Morris, a critic at large for The New York Times, decided to grow a mustache.

    The reviews were mixed and predictable. He heard it described as “porny” and “creepy,” as well as “rugged” and “extra gay.”

    It was a comment on a group call, however, that gave him pause. Someone noted that his mustache made him look like a lawyer for the N.A.A.C.P.’s legal defense fund.

    “It was said as a winking correction and an earnest clarification — Y’all, this is what it is,” Wesley said. “The call moved on, but I didn’t. That is what it is: one of the sweetest, truest things anybody had said about me in a long time.”

    On today’s episode of The Sunday Read, Wesley Morris’s story about self-identity and the symbolic power of the mustache.

    This story was written by Wesley Morris and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

    • 38 Min.

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4.5 von 5
70,101 Bewertungen

70,101 Bewertungen

JennKell01 ,

A great counterbalance to skimming and doom scrolling

I start most days with The Daily. I love the depth and dimension around the selected stories, and also hearing reporters’ voices and perspectives in a richer way. Michael Barbaro is an excellent narrator and curator too. Keep it up!

dina123! ,

Today’s Field episode on Guns

Do you really think this is good reporting pushing his apocalyptic view from a handful of people right before an election? You are promoting the violence in the streets scenario. Shame

Constantine1! ,

The Field episode Suburban Women

Amazing episode reflecting amazing women

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