18 episodes

The 2020s will be America’s deciding decade, full of choices that will determine our entire future. While this decade’s first year opened with chaos and anguish, there is still reason to believe we’re on the precipice of a new chapter. Who are the thinkers and doers who are catalyzing action and paving the way for enduring change? What are the big ideas worth wrestling with and placing bets on? Join Pete Buttigieg as he engages leaders who are confronting our greatest challenges and whose work could hold the key to this Deciding Decade.

The Deciding Decade with Pete Buttigieg iHeartRadio

    • Politics
    • 4.7 • 1.3K Ratings

The 2020s will be America’s deciding decade, full of choices that will determine our entire future. While this decade’s first year opened with chaos and anguish, there is still reason to believe we’re on the precipice of a new chapter. Who are the thinkers and doers who are catalyzing action and paving the way for enduring change? What are the big ideas worth wrestling with and placing bets on? Join Pete Buttigieg as he engages leaders who are confronting our greatest challenges and whose work could hold the key to this Deciding Decade.

    John Legend on broadening the Black experience and criminal justice reform

    John Legend on broadening the Black experience and criminal justice reform

    Music represents such a vital perspective with the potential to cut across boundaries, habits, and prejudice, and musicians have a lot to offer, not just within, but beyond the world of entertainment. John Legend is a perfect example, having blessed our screens and ears with beautiful, powerful, and important music, television, and movies over the years. But he is also working passionately to restore rights and gain equality for so many in this nation. John joins Pete to discuss why he won't just "shut up and sing," the fine line between free speech and censorship on social media, and his work with his organization, FreeAmerica, which aims to tackle mass incarceration.

    • 37 min
    MINISODE: 15-year-old Marley Dias on her push to diversify children's literature

    MINISODE: 15-year-old Marley Dias on her push to diversify children's literature

    It's important, but not often prioritized, that younger generations see themselves in the stories before them. Are there characters who have similar backgrounds, characteristics, and experiences to them? Do they see their families and neighborhoods reflected in what they read? Too often, the answer is no. But at 15, Marley Dias has already done a lot to change that. In 2015, she launched the #1000BlackGirlBooks drive to collect and donate 1,000 children’s books featuring Black female protagonists. To date, she’s collected over 12,000 books. Continuing our series of conversations with youth leaders, Pete talks to Marley about the lack of diversity in children's books, the importance of representation in the classroom, and the surprising pattern in the books she found.

    • 26 min
    Renee Montgomery on opting out of this WNBA season for social justice work

    Renee Montgomery on opting out of this WNBA season for social justice work

    Athletes this year have had a tremendous impact on the election and on national conversations around equal pay, social and racial justice, and more. From the U.S. women's soccer team fighting for equal pay to LeBron James' More Than a Vote organization registering and turning people out to vote, there are so many inspiring athletes who are standing up and using their platforms for good. Among them is Atlanta Dream player Renee Montgomery, a WNBA champion who opted out of the 2020 season in the wake of the George Floyd murder to focus on social justice initiatives. Renee joins Pete to talk about the intersection between politics and sports, the expectation for athletes to stay quiet on social issues, and what happened when her team's co-owner publicly opposed the Black Lives Matter movement.

    • 35 min
    Mary Kay Henry and MO State Rep. Rasheen Aldridge on income inequality and the future of labor

    Mary Kay Henry and MO State Rep. Rasheen Aldridge on income inequality and the future of labor

    As a new president prepares to take office and the country continues to reel from the effects of the pandemic, income inequality and workers' rights remain a central issues in our country. To speak more about these issues, Pete is joined by two of the most active and dynamic figures in the labor movement today: Missouri State Rep. Rasheen Aldridge and Mary Kay Henry, president of Service Employees International Union (SEIU), one of the largest labor unions in America. Together, they discuss the fight for a $15 minimum wage, the correlation between racial and economic inequality, and the importance of local governments for workers rights.

    • 38 min
    MINISODE: David Hogg on gun violence prevention and turning tragedy into a movement

    MINISODE: David Hogg on gun violence prevention and turning tragedy into a movement

    Gun violence prevention has risen to the forefront of American politics because of the mass casualty events that have devastated our communities and the day-to-day violence that commands less attention but destroys even more lives. It’s also getting attention because of the phenomenal work being done from groups like March For Our Lives, co-founded by David Hogg. David is a former student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., where the deadliest high school shooting in U.S. history took place in 2018. As part of our special series with youth leaders, David talks to Pete about dedicating his time fighting for gun legislation, approaching youth leadership with humility, and why gun violence is a symptom of a much bigger injustice.

    • 25 min
    Rev. Dr. William Barber II on tackling systematic racism and combating poverty

    Rev. Dr. William Barber II on tackling systematic racism and combating poverty

    In politics, there’s always a heavy focus on making the country work for the middle class. But the stark reality is there are 140 million poor and low-income people in this country. And if we don’t figure out how to mobilize around poverty -- to name it, expose the truth of it, and fix it -- we won’t be able break it. Reverend Dr. William Barber II has been working on this moral cause for years and joins Pete to discuss the truth about poverty and systemic racism in this nation, his movement of fusion politics, and his success with political organizing during the pandemic.

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
1.3K Ratings

1.3K Ratings

LenaJones77 ,

Brilliant

Pete is an excellent interviewer. The episodes with Barbara Lee, Glennon Doyle, and Reverend Barber are so so important

BJMose ,

Thoughtful conversations

Pete’s podcast with David Hogg was among his best yet. I can envision a future David Hogg as a tenured professor back at Harvard or Vassar College (my ala mater), teaching social justice to our next generations, can’t you?

whysomanyglitches ,

Amazing

Great perspectives of divisive issues

More by iHeartRadio