21 episodes

Imagine yourself dining with Socrates, Plato, or Pythagoras... maybe even Cicero and Julius Caesar...being a soldier marching with Alexander's the Great army in the vast Persian empire discovering new foods... or try and picture the richness of fruits and vegetables in the lush Hanging Gardens of Babylon...what foods did our ancestors ate?
How did all begin? Why am I so hooked on ancient recipes and ingredients? Is the food delicious? Wholesome? Do you need to know? I think so! Recipes, ingredients, ways of cooking. Timeless and continuous yet unique and so alien to us now days. Staple ingredients of the Mediterranean world -as we think now- like tomatoes, potatoes, rice, peppers, didn't exist. What did they eat? We will travel and imagine how it was to eat like a Greek Philosopher in a symposium in Athens, as a Roman Emperor or as a rich merchant in the last night in Pompeii......Lavish dinners, exotic ingredients, barbaric elements, all intertwined...Stay tuned and find out more here, in 'The Delicious Legacy' Podcast!
Find all out, right here!
Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-delicious-legacy.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Delicious Legacy The Delicious Legacy

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

Imagine yourself dining with Socrates, Plato, or Pythagoras... maybe even Cicero and Julius Caesar...being a soldier marching with Alexander's the Great army in the vast Persian empire discovering new foods... or try and picture the richness of fruits and vegetables in the lush Hanging Gardens of Babylon...what foods did our ancestors ate?
How did all begin? Why am I so hooked on ancient recipes and ingredients? Is the food delicious? Wholesome? Do you need to know? I think so! Recipes, ingredients, ways of cooking. Timeless and continuous yet unique and so alien to us now days. Staple ingredients of the Mediterranean world -as we think now- like tomatoes, potatoes, rice, peppers, didn't exist. What did they eat? We will travel and imagine how it was to eat like a Greek Philosopher in a symposium in Athens, as a Roman Emperor or as a rich merchant in the last night in Pompeii......Lavish dinners, exotic ingredients, barbaric elements, all intertwined...Stay tuned and find out more here, in 'The Delicious Legacy' Podcast!
Find all out, right here!
Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-delicious-legacy.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    A Short History of Ice Cream

    A Short History of Ice Cream

    Hello! Welcome to another episode of our podcast!
    The structure you see on the image, is a "yakhchal" an ingenious Ancient Persian structure that creates really cold storage larders, in the middle of the baking hot desert! 
    What could call itself the first ice cream cup was found in Egypt in a tomb from the Second Dynasty (2700 BC). This was a kind of mould, consisting of two silver cups, one of which contained snow (or crushed ice) and the other cooked fruit. “Icehouses”, where snow was stored and ice deliberately formed, were undoubtedly an extremely ancient invention. Around AD300 in India they found a way to manufacture cheap ice: Porous clay pots containing boiled, cooled water were laid out on top of straw in shallow trenches; under favourable circumstances, thin ice would form on the surface during winter nights which could be harvested and combined for sale.
    Of course ancient Persians by 400BC have mastered the art and technique of creating ice in the deserts of Iran for their needs ie storing food and for pleasure in form of iced drinks! This practice requires an ingenious structure called a yakhchāl
    The emperor Nero had snow and ice transported from mountains or volcanoes such as Mount Etna, these natural ice being stored in ice-boxes and buried in wells to be preserved. Nero also feasted his guests with crushed fruit with honey and snow, practices that Seneca found very expensive.
    How long have these sorbets and frozen fruits been eaten ? Historians remain silent on the subject. It seems that these icy preparations lasted in the Middle East but not in the West.
    In China in the 16th century B.C.E under the Shang Dynasty we are told that the emperor revelled in granites made of snow, milk and spices. Chinese had developed a process where they managed to freeze ice cream by using salt and salpeter (nitre) to lower the freezing point of ice. King Tang (c. 1675 – 1646 BC), had 94 ice men who helped to make a dish of buffalo milk, flour and camphor. During the Tang Dynasty an elegant drink was recorded which consisted of goat, cow of buffalo milk cooked with flour and camphor and then placed in iron containers and buried in snow or ice.
    The legend said that Kublai Khan founder of the Yuan dynasty, loved to drink milk, and would add ice to the milk to make it last longer during the summer. He also added preserves and jam to his favourite icy drink, creating the first "prototype of ice cream let's say. Kublai Khan issues a decree that anybody except the royal family can make ice cream in order to keep production process private.
    the famous Italian traveller of the middle ages, Marco Polo met Kublai Khan and had the honour of enjoying the royal treat. After leaving China, Marco Polo brought the technique of making ice cream back to Italia. Marco Polo is often recognized for bringing knowledge of Chinese ice cream techniques to Italy where it was perfected, but it seems clear that news about ice cream has travelled to Europe from the Arab world, also via a number other sources.
    The Arabs called it "Chinese snow". It was called "Chinese salt" by the Iranians/Persians. Ancient Greeks and the ancient Romans, of the upper classes, used this white powder, dissolved in water, to cool their wines. It was an expensive commodity, fairly rare and difficult to find, and its use appears to have been limited only to the cooling of bottles of wine at important dinners. Yes we are talking about saltpetre or potassium nitrate!
    Saltpetre cools water by producing an endothermic reaction. This is a chemical reaction whereby, as it dissolves, the saltpetre literally pulls the heat out of the water as part of that process, thus lowering the temperature of the water. For this reason, there is a limit to how cool the water can become.
    From the Greeks and the Romans this method was passed on, or perhaps rediscovered and improved by Persia

    • 30 min
    A short history of bread

    A short history of bread

    The Greek playwright Euripides said; "What is abundance? In a word, and no more, the wise are content with what is necessary". And we can all agree, what could be more necessary than bread, oil and wine?
    Hello! 
    My name is Thomas Ntinas and this is the Delicious Legacy Podcast!
    Today I will sing the praises of bread! We'll see the history and myths and techniques of this delicious, nourishing magical food, going from a seed of a wild grass to dust and then to this warm, crunchy, chewy deliciousness that fed empires!
    Archestratus on where to find good bread: "First then I will list the gifts of Demeter of the fair tresses, my dear Moschus: keep it safe in your heart. Now the best to get hold of and the finest of all, cleanly bolted from barley with a good grain, is in Lesbos, in the wave-surrounded breast of famous Eresos. It is whiter than snow from the sky: if the gods eat barley groats then Hermes must come and buy it for them from there. In seven-gated Thebes too it is reasonably good, and in Thasos and some other cities, but it is like grape pips compared with Lesbian. Get that idea clearly into your head. Get hold of a Thessalian roll, rounded into a circle and well pounded by hand They themselves call this roll krimnitas, but others call it chondrinos bread. Then I praise the son of fine wheat flour from Tegea, ash-bread. Bread made in the market, famous Athens provides for mortals, of an excellent quality. In Erythrae which bears clusters of grapes a white bread comes out of the oven, bursting with the delicate flavours of the season, and will bring pleasure at the feast."
    Enjoy!
    with music from the amazingly talented Pavlos Kapralos
    If you like to support the podcast and get some exclusive content alongside with recipes do go to Patreon!
    Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-delicious-legacy.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 42 min
    Traditional, but perhaps unknown food of Southern England

    Traditional, but perhaps unknown food of Southern England

    Firstly,
    Apologies for some pronunciations! I think I've 'murdered' some words or place names. So sorry. Below, you'll find the a list with the food stuff I'm talking about on the podcast.
    Dorset Blue VinneyElversBath ChapsForntum Black HamBrawnHead or Pork CheeseGloucester Old Spots PigHogs PuddingApple CakeBlueberry PieChilli MustardThanks to the detailed research by Laura Mason and Catherine Brown and their books!
    A lot of info comes from The Experienced English Housekeeper, is a cookery book by the English businesswoman Elizabeth Raffald (1733–1781). It was first published in 1769.
    The book contains some 900 recipes for: soups; main dishes including roast and boiled meats, boiled puddings, and fish; desserts, table decorations and "little savoury dishes"; potted meats, drinks, wines, pickles, preserves and distilled essences. The recipes consist largely of direct instructions to the cook, and do not contain lists of ingredients. The book is illustrated with three fold-out copper plate engravings.
    The book is noted for its practicality, departing from earlier practice in avoiding plagiarism, consisting instead almost entirely of direct instructions based on Raffald's experience. It introduced the first known recipe for a wedding cake covered in marzipan and royal icing, and is an early use of barbecue. The book remains a reference for cookery writers.
    http://www.elizabethraffaldsociety.org/ 
    Other bits come from Martha Bradley's book The British Housewife (1758)
    The title page of book version of The British Housewife, published in 1758,[a] outlines that the work contains information on cookery, pastry, puddings, preserves, pickles, fricassees, ragouts, soups, sauces, jellies, tarts, cakes, creams, custards, candies, dried fruits, sweetmeats, wines, cordials and distilled spirits. The book also contained a chapter on cures for common ailments, which included a recipe that included powdered earthworm to cure ague. The work was divided up into monthly sections, and showed a "sophisticated organisation", according to Davidson.
    Bradenham Ham (Or Fortnum Black Ham) originated in Wiltshire, England. The ham is first dry-cured in salt, then placed in a liquid cure of molasses, coriander, juniper berries, and other ingredients. After curing, it is aged for 6 months, then smoked. The outside skin of the ham becomes black and shiny. The meat inside is sweet and mild.
    You can see a great recipe for Brawn at Borough Markets website:
    https://boroughmarket.org.uk/recipes/brawn 
    Thanks! Hope you enjoy!
    Thom
    Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-delicious-legacy.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 29 min
    An Interview with Chef Giancarlo Vatteroni

    An Interview with Chef Giancarlo Vatteroni

    This August just passed, I had a wonderful chat with chef Gianni about all things food.
    Giancarlo Vatteroni aka Gianni, is an amazing Italian chef that has been cooking his delicious family recipes -and other yummy stuff- in London for over 25 years, working in Moro, Sugar Club, Salt Yard Group / Dehesa, The Modern Pantry, The Union Cafe amongst many.
    We go through all the troubles and tribulations of the professional chef's life in London of course, but mainly the fun stuff of food memories growing up in Tuscany, fishing, cooking and serving pizza! And of course secret recipes from his father, favourite dishes, ingredients and some pizza classified info!
    Gianni is starting a new exciting trip in his cooking travels, -this time a little more literally- with a mobile pizza van, "Pizza Squad" coming soon near you, serving amazing pizzas and the exciting farinata! A pie/pitta made from chickpea flour and really simple toppings like olive oil and salt. Simplicity and taste to the max!
    We talk about the freedom and fun having your own little food business and how one returns eventually, back to their roots;
    As a teenager, Gianni was working with his family for years in their pizza restaurant. And after a massive detour involving moving in London and cooking on some amazing restaurants he is back to pizza!
    And what is the difference between Neapolitan and pizza from the North of Italy, and of course delicious Italian cheeses; who does the best? Italians or Spanish?
    From December, you'll find them in Beresford square in Woolwich for lunch time trade!
    Follow them on Twitter and Instagram
    Twitter: @PizzaSquadUK1
    Instagram: PizzaSquadUK1
    and get in touch and check the menu:
    Website: http://pizzasquad.co.uk/
    E-mail: pizzasquaduk@gmail.com
    Enjoy!
    Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-delicious-legacy.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 59 min
    Mouthwatering, Unusual Greek Cheeses

    Mouthwatering, Unusual Greek Cheeses

    Cheese!
    Greek Cheese in fact!
    Today, on this episode I am taking you on a virtual curd-y tour of Greece, through the medium of ...cheese!
    We'll travel across each region, each county, each geographical province that comprises Hellas today, and we're going to see one or two (or more!!!) cheeses that must be celebrated, known and tasted!
    In fact, while certainly Greece doesn't have the immense variety and the superbly complex cheeses of Italy, France and UK (and some Spanish cheeses too!) definitely has some that define the character of each place they come from, that taste different, unique, and are steeped into the thousands years old tradition of cheesemaking.
    A land that has high mountains, wild forests, thousands of islands and such a varied climate, surely can have cheeses tied to the specific microclimate of the region it comes form, the flora, the herbs and flowers that the animals eat. Well you'll find out here.
    Cheese made with fig sap, sun dried, cured in wine, or olive pulp, or bathed in sea water....Cheeses matured in massive goats skins...!
    Listen and explore the rich variety of Greek cheeses here, and I wish and hope once this pandemic is over, you can go and taste them yourselves!
    You can buys some amazing Greek cheeses in London from the following suppliers:
    Maltby and Greek
    https://www.maltbyandgreek.com/collections/cheese 
    Odysea:
    https://www.odysea.com/products/cheese
    Credits:
    Opening and closing music theme: Cloudcub " Waltz Detunee" written by Sebastien Froment, performed by Cloudcub.
    https://cloudcub.bandcamp.com/
    Additional Music composed, performed by Pavlos Kapralos
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzgAonk4-uVhXXjKSF-Nz1A
    Except "Lasithiou and Pentozali" written, performed and mixed by Cretan Brioche folk ensemble: http://cretanbrioche.com/
    Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-delicious-legacy.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 32 min
    A Short History of Ancient Mesopotamian Food

    A Short History of Ancient Mesopotamian Food

    ...Ninkasi, you are the one who pours out the filtered beer of the collector vat,
    It is (like) the onrush of the Tigris and the Euphrates.
    A brilliant Assyrian hymn to the Goddess of the brewing process Ninkasi. Also a good set of instructions on how to make beer!
    Aside from beer, there are many other inventions that Sumerians are credited with. But...
    There is not enough time in my lifetime to write everything about Mesopotamian food!
    From Sumerians, to Akkadians to Assyrians and Babylonians, we're talking about civilizations and empires that lasted roughly four thousand years! 
    More time has elapsed from the first cuneiform clay tablet in 3200BCE -when writing was invented- till the last around 1st century AD, than from the last until today! 
    As you understand it would be impossible to analyse everything for such a rich, diverse and vast region in both historical and cultural artefacts! 
    So in the 40 minutes that the podcast lasts I hope I covered enough points that will introduce you to the first complex and sophisticated cuisine of mankind! (or at least the first we have some written records about!)
     A few years ago, an unexpected discovery has been made and one that shook things up a bit for us ancient food enthusiasts! From the dusty drawers of the brilliant Babylonian collection at Yale university, 3 cuneiform tablets were exhumed... these tables dating from around 1600BCE contain about 40 recipes, enough to gain some knowledge at last of the secrets of Mesopotamian cuisine!
    Here's recipe 25 from the collection: 
    Ingredients from the tablet: water, fat, roasted barley, mix of chopped shallots, rocket, and coriander, semolina, blood, mashed leeks and garlic. 1 c. whole barley, cleaned 2 c. water; 1 c. prepared stock; 2 tsps. of butter; 1 tsp. salt; ¼ tsp. asafoetida; 1 tsp. ground coriander; 3 shallots, peeled; 1 handful of baby rocket or watercress; 2 tsps. semolina; 2 tsps. blood (optional, if available); 1 leek, white and green parts, well cleaned; 4-5 garlic cloves, peeled.
    “Preheat broiler to the highest setting. Spread the cleaned barley on a baking sheet to form a single layer of grain. Place barley under broiler flame and leave for a few minutes until it starts to smoke and colour. Stir lightly and turn pan if necessary until most barley is tan in colour. Be careful not to burn the grain. Properly roasted barley will taste nutty. When done, remove from flame and let cool. 
    “Add water and prepared stock to a medium saucepan. You may season the stock any way you wish, or use the cooking stock from another recipe. (I used the stock from the hen recipe above.) Add butter, salt, asafoetida and ground coriander, and continue to heat. 
    “In a food processor, pulse shallots and rocket once or twice. Then add the semolina and blood, and pulse one or two more times. Add this mixture to the heating, water and stir. When just short of a boil, add the barley and stir well. Bring back to a boil. Then reduce heat, cover and cook over a medium-low flame until about three-quarters done—20 to 30 minutes. 
    “As the barley is cooking, pulse leeks and garlic two to four times until minced but not mushy. Add this to the barley and stir once or twice—not too much or barley will be soggy. Partially re-cover saucepan and continue to cook, checking frequently. It should be done or nearly done within 10 minutes.
    Enjoy!
    As you usual, if you want to contribute and help me do this podcast you can support me on Patreon. I have 5 levels of sponsorship
    and on the highest one you will have the pleasure of me cooking an ancient 3 course menu for you! So what are you waiting for? Subscribe! :-)
    https://www.patreon.com/thedeliciouslegacy
    Music by the amazing Pavlos Kapralos!
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzgAonk4-uVhXXjKSF-Nz1A
    Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/the-delicious-legacy.

    See acast.com/privacy for priva

    • 40 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To