300 episodes

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    The flames spread: protests in America

    The flames spread: protests in America

    Demonstrations against police violence have only amplified. We ask why George Floyd’s death touched a nerve, and why these events keep happening in America. A look at the country’s cyber-defences reveals considerable weaknesses—what are states to do as electronic attacks outpace the conventional kind? And what museums are doing now to document the history unfolding around them.
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    • 22 min
    Editor’s Picks: June 1st 2020

    Editor’s Picks: June 1st 2020

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how the world’s most powerful country is handling covid-19, China’s decision to impose a security law on Hong Kong threatens a broader reckoning (10:04). And why mercenaries are still hired by African governments (18:30).


    For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.
     
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    • 27 min
    Checks and Balance: The American way

    Checks and Balance: The American way

    America has passed a grim milestone: 100,000 deaths from covid-19. Many Americans think the country has been hit uniquely hard and that the president’s bungled response is to blame. That view is not borne out by international comparisons. But, as all 50 states reopen with the virus still prevalent, Americans are right to be nervous. How will America’s efforts to recover impact the presidential race?


    John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. US policy correspondent Idrees Kahloon and Henry Curr, our economics editor, also join.


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    • 36 min
    Crying foul, again: Black Lives Matter

    Crying foul, again: Black Lives Matter

    Protests have broken out in Minneapolis and far beyond, following another black man’s death at the hands of a white policeman. Can the once-mighty Black Lives Matter make itself heard? The pandemic may threaten London’s place as Britain’s undisputed centre of gravity. And a researcher spooks spooks by revealing a decades-old spy pact. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer
     
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    • 21 min
    The Economist Asks: Marcus Samuelsson

    The Economist Asks: Marcus Samuelsson

    America’s independent restaurants face a future in which half their tables stand empty. Anne McElvoy asks award-winning chef and restaurateur Marcus Samuelsson how restaurants can reinvent their business models to survive. They talk about converting chic eateries into community kitchens in the covid-19 crisis and why he thinks Joe Biden deserves a chance. Also, what does Mr Samuelsson make of racial tensions following the fatal police brutality case in Minnesota? And he takes Anne McElvoy on a culinary tour from chicken stew in his native Ethiopia via Swedish lingonberry vodka to red-velvet cake in Harlem.


    For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.


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    • 29 min
    Checking their privilege: Beijing’s threat to Hong Kong

    Checking their privilege: Beijing’s threat to Hong Kong

    China’s parliament voted today to draft legislation that would utterly undermine the territory’s independence. What now for protesters, for Western powers, for the region’s foreign firms? The pandemic has quashed some crimes but has also created new nefarious opportunities. And it may be closing time for the golden age of the booze business.
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    • 21 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
2K Ratings

2K Ratings

BGreig3 ,

Biased not balanced

Biased not balanced

Gets most issues WRONG, especially economic predictions.

Economist China reporters have lost their independence and they spread CCP lies and propaganda, such as calling the USA racist, ironic coming from the most racist nations in history, China and England.

Economist USA reporters are clones of DNC media, no separation from the other declining USA news organizations.

Why don’t you just fire your USA hating reporters and just run CCP and DNC press releases, then you could make more profits.

Economist is at its best when reporting worldwide stories from diverse sources.

Please spare us your sniveling biased opinions, your whining and your rants.

Prepare yourselves for Trump’s re-election!

sitoth1st ,

Reliable unbiased and well informed

Really enjoy the podcast .... insightful and well balanced... rely on the financial news as a counterweight to the WSJ which is just as good ....

aududjfififhfjlgofjfhkfgkg ,

To UK

Your time is long gone. and this is not even about economics. The so called freedom, democracy defined by you is also long gone.

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