2,000 episodes

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.

The Economist Podcasts The Economist

    • News
    • 4.4 • 2.9K Ratings

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.

    The World Ahead: Year three

    The World Ahead: Year three

    In wealthy and well-vaccinated countries, year three of the pandemic will be better than year two. But in countries that are poorer, less well vaccinated or both, the deleterious effects of the virus will linger. A disparity of outcomes between rich and poor countries will emerge. Meanwhile, tests and treatments for “long covid” are on the horizon and the mRNA technology used in some covid vaccines could be applied to other diseases. So could there be a “covid dividend”?


    Host Tom Standage talks to The Economist's Edward Carr, Natasha Loder and Slavea Chankova.


    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer.


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    • 26 min
    The first sentence of the story: Aung San Suu Kyi

    The first sentence of the story: Aung San Suu Kyi

    Myanmar’s ousted leader has been sentenced to four years in prison; more guilty verdicts are expected soon. That will only fuel unrest that has not ceased since a coup in February. Scrutiny of Interpol’s new president adds to concerns that the supranational agency is in authoritarians’ pockets. And governments start to back the “seasteading” of libertarians’ dreams.
    Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here 
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    • 22 min
    Editor’s Picks: December 6th 2021

    Editor’s Picks: December 6th 2021

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: what the Omicron variant means for the world economy, what experiments with “free banking” in the 18th and 19th centuries reveal about the future of stablecoins (10:53) and how the legacy of Stalin’s gulag continues to shape Russian fortunes (18:16) 
     
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    • 23 min
    Checks and Balance: Courting controversy

    Checks and Balance: Courting controversy

    The Supreme Court looks poised to place dramatic limits on abortion rights. Liberals worry this signals a conservative takeover of the nation’s laws, but the justices deny that they are politicians in robes. How is the Supreme Court reshaping America?


    The Economist’s Steve Mazie explains what another case on the docket reveals about the court’s conservative wing. We go back to a surprising ruling on gay rights. And former Trump official Sarah Isgur tells us what the right thinks of the court.


    Jon Fasman presents with Charlotte Howard. 


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    • 42 min
    Taiwan thing after another: the Solomon Islands

    Taiwan thing after another: the Solomon Islands

    The archipelago’s diplomatic pivot to China has added an international dimension to the latest flare-up of domestic tensions. We ask how this tiny state figures into far larger geopolitics. British law permits medical cannabis for children with epilepsy—so why are so few able to get it? And a Formula 1 race may mark the end of Saudi Arabia’s alcohol ban.
    Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here 
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    • 20 min
    The Economist Asks: Eric Cantor

    The Economist Asks: Eric Cantor

    The former House majority leader and Virginia congressman assesses whether the Republican Party needs Donald Trump to win. The one-time rising star of the GOP talks to Anne McElvoy about the lessons learnt from losing his seat to a Tea-Party challenger. Is bipartisanship broken or can his old frenemy President Joe Biden fix it? 


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    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
2.9K Ratings

2.9K Ratings

NanaJHP ,

Border woes

On the whole, I am a huge supporter of The Economist, however, the 11/12 issue of checks and balances was largely unhelpful and lacked any insight. There is no easy answer, so don’t offer one that is pie-in-the-sky and untenable. I’m liberal and pro-immigration but our border woes, as you accurately pointed out, are not really a party-line problem. We are fortunate to have a wealthy country and we need to do as much as possible for the disadvantaged worldwide, but your suggestion of basically throwing open the doors and let anyone who wants to show up to enter is absurd. We have to be measured and we must be courageous enough to say “NO” when that is proper. I do not personally agree with letting wishful immigrants lose in the country while awaiting a legal decision. And, I am absolutely against allowing those who cross illegally to stay. They should get in line like the millions of people from other parts of the world are forced to do. We are governed by the rules of law. We should expect prospective citizens to meet the same standard.

jim jog ,

Terrible

Short on real economic analysis and all opinion

DinoF16 ,

Sorry, can’t listen anymore

Time to shake up the lineup. Start with Scott Gotlieb, is big pharma paying you to play his take commentary EVERY week?!

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