2,000 episodes

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.
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The Economist Podcasts The Economist

    • News
    • 4.4 • 3.3K Ratings

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Tony isn’t blinkin’: Sino-American relations, post-balloon

    Tony isn’t blinkin’: Sino-American relations, post-balloon

    American fighters shot down a balloon that China says was monitoring the weather, but America insists was spying. It was a minor incident, but it highlights the relationship of a great-power rivalry with inadequate guardrails. Our correspondent visits a market in Mumbai to see what might be lost as India’s economy formalises.  And some surprising—and worrying—data puncturing the myth about the skinny French.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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    • 21 min
    Checks and Balance: An academic question

    Checks and Balance: An academic question

    More and more universities across America now require would-be professors to submit so-called diversity statements. These ask applicants to set out their commitment to, and experience of, promoting diversity, equity and inclusion. At the same time some Republican-led states, most notably Florida, are putting their own restrictions on academia.  How healthy is academic freedom in America? 
    Dean of Berkeley Law Erwin Chemerinsky makes the case for diversity statements, while NYU’s Jonathan Haidt argues against them. We go back to when professors took a stand against anti-communism. And former head of Human Rights Watch Kenneth Roth recounts his own fight for academic freedom.  
    John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.
    You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.

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    • 39 min
    Bold eagle: America's industrial evolution

    Bold eagle: America's industrial evolution

    As part of The Economist’s new series on the remaking of the country's economy, our correspondent looks at the Biden administration’s audacious industrial plans. Russia’s media outlets have been relentlessly squeezed, so many have set up newsrooms in exile; we examine the rise of “offshore journalism”. And reflecting on the life of Gina Lollobrigida, a remarkable, irrepressible, impenitent Italian actress.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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    • 27 min
    Money Talks: Goldman Sags

    Money Talks: Goldman Sags

    Goldman once dominated Wall Street. In 2009, after the financial crisis, when most financial institutions were left reeling, Goldman had its best year ever. It appeared an apex-predator, one that could outsmart its rivals in even the toughest environments. But the last decade has been humbling for Goldman.
    On this week’s podcast, hosts Alice Fulwood, Tom Lee-Devlin and Mike Bird ask what is going wrong with Goldman Sachs. We hear how the bank grew from a basement office selling promissory notes in downtown Manhattan to become the most revered name on Wall Street. Analyst Steven Chubak tells us when things changed for Goldman, and how it is trying to adapt. And The Economist's Patrick Foulis says the bank’s mystique is at odds with its “mediocre, pedestrian and humdrum” valuation.
    Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

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    • 38 min
    Poll fishing: Peru’s persistent protests

    Poll fishing: Peru’s persistent protests

    The country remains riven by unrest since the “self-coup” and subsequent arrest of its president in December; only an early election might bring a return to calm. Our correspondent goes shopping to discover the spending habits of Generation Z and millennials. And examining the work of Tom Lehrer, a mathematician who was an unlikely midwife at the birth of modern satire.
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer


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    • 27 min
    Babbage: Alternatives to alcohol

    Babbage: Alternatives to alcohol

    Alcohol is the most widely used drug in the world, but it is also the cause of three million deaths each year and has been linked to many other long-term illnesses. In addition, the loss of productivity due to hangovers has an outsized impact on some economies. People still want to have a good time, though, and innovators are dreaming up ways to enjoy the effects of alcohol, without the costs.
    Jason Hosken, our producer, visits Brixton Brewery to speak to co-founders Jez Galaun and Xochitl Benjamin about the rise of alcohol-free beer. Natasha Loder, The Economist’s health editor, investigates the herbal drinks that claim to mimic the effects of alcohol. Plus, David Nutt, a professor at Imperial College London explains how alcohol affects the brain and why his synthetic alcohol could reduce excessive drinking and end hangovers forever. 
    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

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    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
3.3K Ratings

3.3K Ratings

blablayaddayadda ,

Fascinating and insightful.

Love the in depth commentary and insight from clearly informed individuals. Great job guys.

i am talking to you777 ,

Good job

Thank you for letting us know what is going on in the world😁

Monsterjuju ,

Interesting but a bit obvious

They almost lost me on the Disney story when they actually said “ the company isn’t about Mickey Mouse anymore.” Blanket statements like this make me think that they dont have a lot of respect for their listener. You’d have to be an alien, who just landed on the planet earth, to not know this. This is the Economist you don’t need to dumb the podcast down. That said some of the information around the video game industry and the streaming business was new to me. I think the production values could be better, but there is some information here that was interesting. The issue for me is how it was presented.

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