2,235 episodes

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.

The Economist Podcasts The Economist

    • News
    • 4.4 • 2.9K Ratings

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.

    Checks and Balance: AUKUS ruckus

    Checks and Balance: AUKUS ruckus

    Occasionally, you can see big shifts in foreign policy happen right before your eyes. The unveiling of AUKUS, the trilateral defence pact between Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States, was one of those rare occasions. What does AUKUS tell us about America’s changing priorities?  


    The Economist’s Daniel Franklin explains how the pact is a response to Chinese aggression. We go back to when a European crowd went wild for an American political star. And Paris bureau chief Sophie Pedder tells us how AUKUS may benefit French president Emmanuel Macron.  


    John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.


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    • 41 min
    Clubs seal: China’s view as alliances multiply

    Clubs seal: China’s view as alliances multiply

    Leaders of “the Quad” are meeting in person for the first time; drama from the AUKUS alliance still simmers. Our Beijing bureau chief discusses how Chinese officials see all these club ties. As Chancellor Angela Merkel’s time in office wanes, we assess Germany’s many challenges she leaves behind. And the sweet, sweet history of baklava, a Middle Eastern treat gone global.
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    • 23 min
    The Economist Asks: What happens after Merkel?

    The Economist Asks: What happens after Merkel?

    Host Anne McElvoy reviews the German Chancellor’s 16-year leadership with Wolfgang Nowak, a political veteran who advised Angela Merkel's predecessor, and asks what made her such a phenomenal politician. And as the race to replace Angela Merkel draws to a close, Anne talks to security expert Claudia Major about the domestic and foreign challenges awaiting her successor. 


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    • 26 min
    Same assembly, rewired: the United Nations meets

    Same assembly, rewired: the United Nations meets

    The annual United Nations General Assembly is more than just worthy pledges and fancy dinners; we ask where the tensions and the opportunities lie this time around. Last year’s fears of a crippling “twindemic” of covid-19 and influenza proved unfounded—and that provides more reason to worry this year. And why “like” is, like, really useful. 
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    • 22 min
    Money Talks: Volatile gas

    Money Talks: Volatile gas

    The price of natural gas is rocketing, with global consequences. Is volatility in this crucial fuel here to stay? We also ask why an investigation at the World Bank has put Kristalina Georgieva, the head of the International Monetary Fund, in the spotlight. And, after our adventures in DeFi-land last week, economist Eswar Prasad assesses who should control the future of money and payments. Patrick Lane hosts


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    • 27 min
    The homes stretch: Evergrande

    The homes stretch: Evergrande

    China’s property behemoth has slammed up against new rules on its giant debt pile. We ask what wider risks it now poses as a cash crunch bites. Britain has begun a demographic trend unusual in the rich world: its share of young people is spiking—and will be for a decade. And what the pandemic has done for the future of office-wear.
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    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
2.9K Ratings

2.9K Ratings

😉💙🙃 ,

Western drought

Not only do we have a huge population boom in urbanization of open spaces. We also have the migration boom of illegals crossing our western boarders. So, too, the homeless population is growing exponentially here in the west as renters and homeowners around the country lose their housing. It’s a multi faceted problem…

糖糖angel ,

love it.

You can listen to it everyday and get updates about our world.
Unlike twitter for quick info, those updates front the economist podcast give you thorough info you should know.

BGreig3 ,

Biased not balanced. Partisan leftist nonsense.

Warning: you need to fact check everything you hear on this podcast. There is such a heavy bias, most reports are full of lies and innuendo. Presents a hard left-leaning bias peddled to Americans with British accents combined with the occasional American socialist voice. Gets most issues WRONG, especially economic predictions. Economist China reporters have lost their independence and they spread CCP lies and propaganda, such as calling the USA racist, ironic coming from the two most racist nations in history, China and England. Economist USA reporters are clones of failing leftist DNC media, no separation from the other declining USA news organizations. Why don’t you just fire your USA hating reporters and just run CCP and DNC press releases, then you could make more profits. Economist is at its best when reporting worldwide stories from diverse sources. Please spare us your sniveling biased opinions, your whining and your rants. The Economist is so predictable as it constantly defaults to pro-death-abortion advocacy, blaming everything on global warming and gender disparity, as well as nearly every podcast has race baiting segment. Does The Economist intentionally try to insult hundreds of millions of Trump supporters regularly or is it just your thickheaded arrogance showing? Citizens of the United States declared their independence and freedom from England 250 years ago. We don’t need British media and accents to lecture us about our political systems and other matters. GO HOME TO THE UK AND YOU WILL NOTICE THEY AREN’T LISTENING TO YOUR HARD LEFT LABOR SOCIALIST BLATHER EITHER AS UK VOTERS WISELY VOTED FOR BREXIT AND CONSERVATIVE LEADERS AND REJECTED LABOUR’S SOCIALISM. MAYBE YOU WILL FIND AN AUDIENCE IN VENEZUELA, CUBA AND CHINA. STOP TRYING TO RUIN THE USA. The world is turning RIGHT as The Economist and other failing media are turning left. Wake-up and get balanced by moving away from your hard left train-wreck.

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