20 min

The essence of humanity in an AI-driven world The Bizgnus Podcast

    • Business

•  Unveiling the core traits that define us

•  “People and AI will almost become indistinguishable”

 (Total Recorded Time is 20:02)

 

 Steve Bates, a former reporter and editor with the Washington Post as well as other newspapers, has been writing science fiction short stories for more than a decade. Now in his new novel, “Castle of Sand,” (Sunstone Press, July 2023) he grapples with perhaps the most fundamental question of all: what it truly means to be human in a world increasingly reliant on artificial intelligence.

 

He’s reluctant to make definite predictions, but after studying artificial intelligence for his book, Mr. Bates is prepared to predict the AI future will be neither dystopian nor wildly optimistic.

 

“I’d say we’re headed to some sort of convergence. And I think that means that AI and humans are going to get married and live together forever after happily,” he says.  “It’s not inconceivable to me that we will somehow form a partnership where people and AI will almost become indistinguishable.”

 

In this edition of Bizgnus Interviews, Mr. Bates talks about what he has learned about artificial intelligence as humanity stands on the precipice of a profound intersection with machines smarter than we are.

 

Please click here to watch the interview:  https://youtu.be/GAwir07C4ZU



While Mr. Bates’ novel is a work of fiction, in many aspects it seems closer to next week’s newspaper that’s tossed on the driveway.

 

According to the online news service Axios, Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers recently asked undergraduate students to test whether artificial intelligence chatbots could be used by nonexperts in causing a pandemic.

 

Did it work? Within an hour the artificial intelligence platforms suggested four pathogens, MIT says.

 

“Widely accessible artificial intelligence threatens to allow people without laboratory training to identify, acquire, and release viruses highlighted as pandemic threats in the scientific literature,” the MIT report says.  The chatbots helped identify which pathogens could inflict the most damage, and even provided information not commonly known among experts.

 

Disturbingly, the research also showed that the AI chatbots offered the students lists of companies that might assist with DNA synthesis -- and suggestions on how to trick them into providing services.

  

Editor’s Note to Readers:  The headline and subhead for this story were written by artificial intelligence.  Everything else is human-generated.

 

For more information:  www.stevebateswriter.com

 

•  Unveiling the core traits that define us

•  “People and AI will almost become indistinguishable”

 (Total Recorded Time is 20:02)

 

 Steve Bates, a former reporter and editor with the Washington Post as well as other newspapers, has been writing science fiction short stories for more than a decade. Now in his new novel, “Castle of Sand,” (Sunstone Press, July 2023) he grapples with perhaps the most fundamental question of all: what it truly means to be human in a world increasingly reliant on artificial intelligence.

 

He’s reluctant to make definite predictions, but after studying artificial intelligence for his book, Mr. Bates is prepared to predict the AI future will be neither dystopian nor wildly optimistic.

 

“I’d say we’re headed to some sort of convergence. And I think that means that AI and humans are going to get married and live together forever after happily,” he says.  “It’s not inconceivable to me that we will somehow form a partnership where people and AI will almost become indistinguishable.”

 

In this edition of Bizgnus Interviews, Mr. Bates talks about what he has learned about artificial intelligence as humanity stands on the precipice of a profound intersection with machines smarter than we are.

 

Please click here to watch the interview:  https://youtu.be/GAwir07C4ZU



While Mr. Bates’ novel is a work of fiction, in many aspects it seems closer to next week’s newspaper that’s tossed on the driveway.

 

According to the online news service Axios, Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers recently asked undergraduate students to test whether artificial intelligence chatbots could be used by nonexperts in causing a pandemic.

 

Did it work? Within an hour the artificial intelligence platforms suggested four pathogens, MIT says.

 

“Widely accessible artificial intelligence threatens to allow people without laboratory training to identify, acquire, and release viruses highlighted as pandemic threats in the scientific literature,” the MIT report says.  The chatbots helped identify which pathogens could inflict the most damage, and even provided information not commonly known among experts.

 

Disturbingly, the research also showed that the AI chatbots offered the students lists of companies that might assist with DNA synthesis -- and suggestions on how to trick them into providing services.

  

Editor’s Note to Readers:  The headline and subhead for this story were written by artificial intelligence.  Everything else is human-generated.

 

For more information:  www.stevebateswriter.com

 

20 min

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