34 episodes

Barbarians, political breakdown, economic collapse, mass migration, pillaging and plunder. The fall of the Roman Empire has been studied for years, but genetics, climate science, forensic science, network models, and globalization studies have reshaped our understanding of one of the most important events in human history. PhD historian and specialist Patrick Wyman brings the cutting edge of history to listeners in plain, relatable English.

The Fall of Rome Podcast Wondery

    • Education
    • 4.8, 1.3K Ratings

Barbarians, political breakdown, economic collapse, mass migration, pillaging and plunder. The fall of the Roman Empire has been studied for years, but genetics, climate science, forensic science, network models, and globalization studies have reshaped our understanding of one of the most important events in human history. PhD historian and specialist Patrick Wyman brings the cutting edge of history to listeners in plain, relatable English.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
1.3K Ratings
1.3K Ratings
Gray_Wolves ,

Another fantastic Romecast

This is right up there with Mike Duncan’s The History of Rome. I struggle to say which I like more; they’re both so great. If Roman history is your thing, you will not be disappointed.

Kash613 ,

Worth a subscription.

This podcast is very well done. It’s well researched and sticks to a regular schedule. If I was going to complain about anything I’d have to say his pronunciation of some names and place is painful to hear sometimes early on. Thankfully it gets better. That honestly the only grin I would have and really it’s not that bad. Unlike some other Rome history podcast he doesn’t waste the listeners time by going on a 20 or 30 episode detour before getting back to point of the podcast. Cough” Emperors of Rome” cough. And he doesn’t use the podcast listeners to pay for his vacations to Italy by pretending its a tour so please donate. In the end it’s worth your time and I hope this helps.

Cpdb ,

Not informative of actual events and cultural evolution.

The great majority of time on this podcast is spent reiterating the same sentiment.
1)Military was a major part of society.
2) administration was important
3) Empires depend on taxes, armies and administration.
4) Romans often interact with “barbarians”
5)Romans and “Barbarians” trade with each other.
6)Romans and “barbarians” marry.
7) There are war lords in “barbaric regions”
8) barbarians raid, Migrate
9) Romans often align with “barbarians”
10) Rulers rule, leaders lead, kings are war lord, arms are made of various people and other obvious observations.

I would say about %90 of the time is spent repeatedly pointing these obvious truisms.

What is missing from this History podcast like many other is linking together events showing the chain reaction of event and how distant civilizations effect each other.

For example when the Huns are turned away from Rome it assumed they just went back to the steppes. When you can see that instead the Huns went north. You can see the effects of Huns on Gaul, Germania, Goths and Scandinavia by the way they buried their dead, the way they raid, the rise of Cavalry and the Steppe DNA that is found in Northern Europe men and Hoarses. Instead of showing the relationship of how migration was caused by centuries of Huns pushing west before Attila. Turkish people have been in Europe for a very long time. But this podcast repeatedly implies that the Huns just appear out of nowhere in the 400s.
This pattern is repeated whether talking about Huns and Turks or Scandinavians and Goths.

I really wish Podcasts would spend more time speaking about how empires are effecting each other, migrating, how DNA is exchanged and how different culture cause actual events in a linage , rather then bouncing around, talking at end about what everyday life would be like.

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