90 episodes

The Glossy Beauty Podcast is the newest podcast from Glossy.
Each 30-minute episode features candid conversations about how today’s trends, such as CBD and self-care, are shaping the future of the beauty and wellness industries. With a unique assortment of guests, The Glossy Beauty Podcast provides its listeners with a variety of insights and approaches to these categories, which are experiencing explosive growth. From new retail strategies on beauty floors, to the importance of filtering skincare products through crystals, this show sets out to help listeners understand everything that is going on today, and prepare for what will show up in their feeds tomorrow.

The Glossy Beauty Podcast Glossy

    • Fashion & Beauty
    • 4.5, 59 Ratings

The Glossy Beauty Podcast is the newest podcast from Glossy.
Each 30-minute episode features candid conversations about how today’s trends, such as CBD and self-care, are shaping the future of the beauty and wellness industries. With a unique assortment of guests, The Glossy Beauty Podcast provides its listeners with a variety of insights and approaches to these categories, which are experiencing explosive growth. From new retail strategies on beauty floors, to the importance of filtering skincare products through crystals, this show sets out to help listeners understand everything that is going on today, and prepare for what will show up in their feeds tomorrow.

    Sol de Janeiro's Heela Yang and Camila Pierotti on leading the way for premium body products

    Sol de Janeiro's Heela Yang and Camila Pierotti on leading the way for premium body products

    Before joining Sephora, Sol de Janeiro's premium body products had another retailer stumped. "They said, 'You know, we don't know what to do with you guys,' recalled Heela Yang, one of the company's three founders and its CEO, on the Glossy Beauty Podcast. The company's butt cream, foot cream and body hair lightener put them apart from brands in beauty. "And then she said, 'You know, I think Sephora might be really into you guys.' And she was right."
    Yang founded the company with Camila Pierotti and Marc Capra in 2015. It partnered with Sephora the following year, going into stores nationwide weeks after its Bum Bum Cream for the derrière and its foot cream performed well on Sephora's site.
    A few years ago, Yang said, it was unclear whether the market for upscale products for the body was even sustainable. "If we had made a decision based on the size of the premium body care category back then, we probably wouldn't have launched this brand," she said.
    According to Yang, the company started with the idea of sharing Brazil's inclusive beauty culture before it started a product line. Yang lived in Brazil for a time (as did Capra), and Pierotti is from Rio de Janeiro. "There is something that starts in the beach culture of Rio -- that beauty is not any sort of universal standard to achieve, it is a feeling. Feeling comfortable in your own skin and feeling happy in your own skin. Brazilians love taking care of their bodies," said Pierotti.
    In the months since the Covid-19 pandemic went global, Sol de Janeiro has pivoted from in-person promotion of its products and events to a DTC-focused model. Its first fragrance, launched in mid-March just as the world came to a halt, had to be quickly shipped back from Sephora stores to fulfill online orders. But, the company's digital business is three times what it was last year, Yang said, and now makes up almost half of its total business.

    • 37 min
    ‘Skin care isn’t just for the face’: Nécessaire's Randi Christiansen on growing her body brand in a pandemic

    ‘Skin care isn’t just for the face’: Nécessaire's Randi Christiansen on growing her body brand in a pandemic

    Skin care isn't just for the face, according to Nécessaire co-founder Randi Christiansen. Christiansen founded the company with Nécessaire co-founder Nick Axelrod in 2018 and debuted digitally first. Their original lineup of clean products -- a curated assortment of body washes, body lotions and sex gels -- was quite unorthodox for the beauty industry just two years ago.
    "Nick and I really felt philosophically that skin doesn't stop at the neck," she said on the Glossy Beauty Podcast.
    Christiansen saw a gap in how much money people were willing to spend on skin care for the face, as well as for their favorite matchas. "It was very clear to both of us that there was just room for what we call real ingredients in body," Christiansen said.
    Nécessaire's now expanded product line entered Sephora.com last month, and pandemic permitting, will debut in its stores in August. The company plans to grow 300% to 400% this year, Christiansen said, in part thanks to this new relationship with Sephora.

    • 40 min
    Kosas' Sheena Yaitanes on why clean makeup accelerated during the pandemic

    Kosas' Sheena Yaitanes on why clean makeup accelerated during the pandemic

    The age of ongoing confinement seems tailor-made for the industry's clean beauty segment.
    "We couldn't be in a more timely position in terms of what we've been pushing for as a brand," said Kosas founder Sheena Yaitanes on this week's episode of the Glossy Beauty Podcast.
    Kosas launched in 2015 with lipstick before moving on to a full clean color assortment. It recently flexed its personal care muscle by debuting deodorant. The company closed a series B in January, on the tail of revenue in the $50 million to $60 million range in 2019. It's expected to triple that business, according to previous reporting by Glossy.
    "I have long believed that the look of beauty was changing. I have long felt alienated from the beauty conversation when you're talking about a makeup routine that requires 15 products or an hour and a half. And I'm a makeup lover, so I know I'm not alone," Yaitanes said.

    • 28 min
    'We don't want to be La Mer': Augustinus Bader CEO Charles Rosier on creating the next cult beauty brand

    'We don't want to be La Mer': Augustinus Bader CEO Charles Rosier on creating the next cult beauty brand

    Some beauty products trickle down from medical use to everyday consumers by happenstance, but Augustinus Bader's skincare line is the opposite, according to the company's CEO Charles Rosier.
    Rosier first learned about Professor Augustinus Bader's research around a "wound gel" in a case study involving a young burn victim. "Basically, using that wound gel [Augustinus] was able to prevent skin graft and scarring to that child," Rosier said on the Glossy Beauty Podcast. "I was really shocked that the thing could exist, but was not widely available."
    As Bader -- a professor of stem cell biology at Germany's University of Leipzig -- told Rosier then, he felt that pharmaceutical companies weren't as willing to fund clinical trials because "the number of cases of burned people in the Western world was not so high. Most cases are actually in the third world," he said. "For a pharmaceutical group, it's not necessarily the most valuable customer."
    Rosier decided to step in and co-found a consumer-centric version of the company in 2018. He thought a skincare brand could help fuel Bader's greater work -- "he's the brain doing the research, I'm the guy behind the scenes," he said. The line has gone on to earn accolades among Hollywood celebrities for its rejuvenating effect, not just its medical expertise. That was by design -- in lieu of a pricy marketing campaigns or influencers, the company distributed samples through a personal connection in Los Angeles in its early days.
    Since then, Augustinus Bader has slowly added new products to its line-up to complement its cult status "The Cream" and "The Rich Cream," which retail for $265. The company expects to earn $70 million in 2020, up from an estimated $24 million in 2019 -- but Rosier doesn't see the company putting dozens of products on store shelves (or online, where it makes most of its sales), despite the demand.
    "We can't lie about it. That product is efficient on its own and it nourishes the skin cells' environment so your skin cells make the right decision," Rosier said.

    • 40 min
    Credo co-founder Annie Jackson on being a good (but exacting) partner to its 135 brands

    Credo co-founder Annie Jackson on being a good (but exacting) partner to its 135 brands

    Credo is betting that customers stuck at home are as beauty-minded as always, but that more than ever, they now have the time to do their research about clean beauty.
    "Health is what anyone is thinking about right now," Credo co-founder Annie Jackson said on the Glossy Beauty Podcast. "I think if we didn't have a customer before this and we do now, it's because she's really understanding that investment in health -- really educating herself on certain chemicals and how they could impact health or the environment."
    Credo carries items from about 135 brands, according to Jackson, and incentivizes them with "more kudos and marketing" to create transparent packaging -- and to stay away from what Credo considers less-than-clean substances.
    Still Jackson doesn't think of clean beauty as an exclusive part of the market anymore. Case in point: the retailer's latest collaboration with Ulta. She talked about the benefits of partnering with Ulta , consumer trends during the pandemic and just how many product submissions Credo entertains on a monthly basis.

    • 45 min
    "Browse commerce is just done': Stella & Dot founder and CEO Jessica Herrin

    "Browse commerce is just done': Stella & Dot founder and CEO Jessica Herrin

    Millions of Americans are still out of work as the coronavirus pandemic's ripples through the economy, and many are unlikely to return to the jobs they held a few months ago.
    A few companies -- including Stella & Dot, Ever and Keep -- have stepped into that vacuum, offering gig economy work for people willing and able to sell cosmetics, clothes and fashion accessories.
    "We really started growing when unemployment was at 8 and 9%. And in some ways you could say the growth of our business was somewhat counter-cyclical, because when people had a greater financial need, not only did you see more people join, but you saw the people that did join work more and earn more," Stella & Dot founder and CEO Jessica Herrin said on the Glossy Podcast of the 2008 final crisis.
    The company counts about 30,000 "ambassadors," though the number of people actively selling on a monthly basis is between 8,000 and 10,000, according to Herrin.
    Prior to Covid-19, Stella & Dot, Ever and Keep went through a $50 million tech revamp to connect sellers with a digital platform (inspired by Shopify, Pinterest and Polyvore) allowing them to set up a curated selection of products -- a storefront, essentially -- which they can then email or text to customers.
    That foresight has been key to surviving as a business during coronavirus.
    "Browse commerce is just done," Herrin said. "Who wants to go to a website and search and come up with a thousand options and look for reviews that may or not be real, rather than get a curated assortment texted to you with personalized recommendations?"

    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
59 Ratings

59 Ratings

Esthetician Heather ,

Beauty Bio 🙄

Disappointed to hear Jamie O’Banion try to justify not going to our Derma or esthetician’s for microneedling. There is NO comparison. The reason you are able to use her tool at home is because it is NOT like the one that is used by Derms and esthetician’s.... it’s nice to be able to maintain good skin at home but it is nothing like the treatment you’ll get with going deeper which is what will happen in your Dermatologist office. Her products aren’t FDA-approved to penetrate to the layer of skin where we actually need the product to reach. That is why you can buy it at retail stores. You’ll never find it in a cosmetic derma office because it doesn’t have enough of the active ingredients to deem it MEDICAL GRADE. She is sweet as sugar but if you’re looking for topical products that are highly active then keep going to your Dermatologist or aesthetician. Her products are so insulting to us who actually went to school for skin and are able to use lights and lasers and other tools to treat skin concerns.

libbyaudrey ,

One of My Favorite Beauty Podcasts!

I listen to quite a few podcasts that talk about leaders in the beauty industry. What I love most about Glossy Beauty’s podcast is the length of each episode and the guests they interview. I was introduced to this podcast by the first episode featuring Miranda Kerr, who I have admired for years. There are so many podcasts talking about beauty these days, but the leaders they bring on Glossy Beauty are relevant and have such interesting stories of how they started their businesses.

beautyjunkie0711 ,

Overall Great But Inconsistent Based On Guest

Hands down the Tatcha and Wander Beauty episodes are THE BEST. The founders share a passion for their companies and customers and it’s obvious. Lots of good info in those episodes and I learned a lot. The RMS episode is simply awful: the founder is condescending and thinks she’s funny. Skip the LOLA episode as she sounds like a marketing robot. All marketing language and no soul.

Top Podcasts In Fashion & Beauty

Listeners Also Subscribed To