186 episodes

The Glossy Podcast is a weekly show on the impact of technology on the fashion and luxury industries with the people making change happen.

The Glossy Podcast Glossy

    • Business
    • 4.0 • 160 Ratings

The Glossy Podcast is a weekly show on the impact of technology on the fashion and luxury industries with the people making change happen.

    Kendra Scott on the 'muscle memory' gained from a financial crisis

    Kendra Scott on the 'muscle memory' gained from a financial crisis

    Kendra Scott insists she isn't kidding when she says she's thankful for 2008's Great Recession.
    "I honestly believe we would not be talking today if that recession hadn't happened, because it forced me to have to run my business differently," Scott said on the Glossy Podcast.
    Scott quickly pivoted the jewelry business to sell directly to consumers, as opposed to via wholesale only. Today, the brand has more than 100 stores nationwide.
    When the pandemic hit, she said, she felt like she'd been here before. "It was like my muscle memory came back."
    Scott joined the podcast to talk about the importance of charitable giving ("Since 2010, we've given over $30 million to women's and children's charities," she said), the human need for physical places like stores and the company's Texas origins, which give it an edge.

    • 37 min
    Another Tomorrow CEO Vanessa Barboni Hallik on how the fashion industry can catch up on sustainability

    Another Tomorrow CEO Vanessa Barboni Hallik on how the fashion industry can catch up on sustainability

    Fashion is a notoriously damaging industry for the environment.
    "It was clear to me that the industry was a solid 7-10 years behind a number of other major consumer industries like food and CPG -- in owning up to the problems, putting in place solutions and educating the consumer," Another Tomorrow CEO Vanessa Barboni Hallik said on the Glossy Podcast.
    Another Tomorrow is a certified B corp, making it for-profit, but with a clear set of social responsibilities. Its industry peers in that regard include Patagonia and Allbirds.
    Each of the company's garments include a QR code that can be scanned for "the customer to see the entire provenance journey," Barboni Hallik said, adding that most customers use the function.

    • 39 min
    7 For All Mankind's Suzanne Silverstein: 'Retailers with brick-and-mortar locations will have to work harder'

    7 For All Mankind's Suzanne Silverstein: 'Retailers with brick-and-mortar locations will have to work harder'

    7 For All Mankind is nearly synonymous with the top-shelf denim trend of the early 2000s. "Premium denim didn't exist [prior]; we really launched this category," company president Suzanne Silverstein said on the Glossy Podcast.
    Twenty years after its founding, the company is now doing a bit more reacting to established trends. The pandemic has put a premium on comfort above all, so the jeans maker is fast-tracking a few articles that focus on just that -- via an "elastic waist, forgiving fit," Silverstein said.
    One focus of 7 For All Mankind that has remained intact is sustainability. The denim industry has a notoriously wasteful reputation, which it's "probably earned," Silverstein conceded. Two-thousand gallons of water are typically required to create one pair of jeans.
    But by 2023, 7 For All Mankind expects that 80% of its products will clear certain scores by the Higg FEM standard.
    "The only thing that's really slowing us down, quite frankly, is our existing raw materials," Silverstein said. "All new materials we work with fit our criteria."

    • 38 min
    Designer Daniella Kallmeyer: 'You could become irrelevant' if you don't take a social stand

    Designer Daniella Kallmeyer: 'You could become irrelevant' if you don't take a social stand

    It took a pandemic for Daniella Kallmeyer to put more of her own voice in the self-named fashion brand she started in 2012.
    "I'm being more vocal about my personal experience and my political views," Kallmeyer said on the Glossy Podcast. "I've given some really raw interviews over the past couple of months, and I certainly have had people reach out to me and tell me how much they appreciate that."
    Taking a stand on social issues is a big part of what companies are expected to do now, she said. And for those that don't? "You could become irrelevant."
    Kallmeyer had projected "major growth" for the calendar year -- "January was our best month in business, to date," she said -- but then the pandemic hit. Since March, she has temporarily closed and reopened the company's newly opened physical store, and has launched a range of digital services for Kallmeyer customers.

    • 41 min
    Bonobos CEO Micky Onvural: ‘October 1 was the beginning of holiday’

    Bonobos CEO Micky Onvural: ‘October 1 was the beginning of holiday’

    As the CEO of digitally native menswear brand Bonobos, Micky Onvural has experienced both extreme challenges and lucky breaks in getting the brand through 2020. 
    “We've always been predominantly e-commerce, so we didn't have the same catch-up game to play as other retailers did,” she said on the Glossy Podcast. “The biggest catch-up game we had to play was on the product side -- because we were ‘wear-to-work,’ but now we want to be ‘wear-everywhere.’”
    To swiftly transition the product, among other untimely elements of the business, the Bonobos team kicked its operations into high gear. As Onvural sees it, that expedited pace is set to define the company’s new normal. 
    “We’ve all gotten used to the fact that change is normal -- and that we have to be very fleet-of-foot, and we need to be half a step ahead, if possible, of what's going on with the customer, the competition and the industry,” she said. “[Five month ago] we were innovating fast, and we've just gotten used to that new pace of working.”
    In addition to sharing how Bonobos plans to build on new learnings, products and initiatives, she discussed how the company is tackling the holiday season and why she believes, “There is always going to be a place for physical stores.” 

    • 36 min
    Todd Snyder on the DTC space: 'Most customers don’t want to buy a shirt from an investment banker’

    Todd Snyder on the DTC space: 'Most customers don’t want to buy a shirt from an investment banker’

    Todd Snyder is a master of collaborations. 
    “I've always looked at brands I want to work with, and they're almost all originators in their space,” Snyder said on the Glossy Podcast. “They’re authentic and real, and American -- and the first of their version.”
    Snyder launched his namesake brand in 2011, after stints as a lead designer at Ralph Lauren, Gap and J.Crew. The brand now averages 2-5 collaborations per year, which account for 50% of the business and vary in length: Its first, with Champion, is eight years running. Most recently, the brand linked with LL Bean on a fashion collection and a lodge in Kennebunkport, Maine on a room’s decor. 
    “Part of our business plan is we look at: How do we expand our audience and also do things that are original, different?” he said. “I lean heavily into the design piece, just because I'm a designer by trade. It's not just, ‘Let's do some cool stuff, I want to slap my name on it.’ I really get into the weeds with the design team; that's the part I love.”
    The 30-year fashion industry veteran also discussed how his brand transitioned from wholesale to DTC, where it’s filling white space and why print is still alive.

    • 41 min

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5
160 Ratings

160 Ratings

SustainableFashionGoals ,

Great For Anyone Working In Fashion

Jill asks great questions and isn’t afraid to dig in and ask tough ones as well. Love the focus on influencers since they are really changing the game of fashion pr/marketing. I can’t get enough of this podcast!

Casaaaaaabdra ,

Nice.

Keep it up!
- Cassandra McClure
Clean Beauty Podcast

Laur McG ,

This is not a beauty business podcast. Period.

Please stop supporting predators. Arielle charnas took COVID bailout money she didn’t need, meaning that actual companies that needed the money missed out - small businesses closed because of her greed. And yet you’re ignoring this and pretending she’s a good business woman - yikes. This is after Arielle received 10M in Venture capital investment money to relaunch her failed brand. Please stop glorifying a woman who is a TERRIBLE business person willing to lie and steal from folks who don’t have $2.5M personal wrath in the bank (which she notably refused to use to save her business, more interesting facts). Arielle’s brand already failed once and was dropped from Nordstrom, it can be found on clearance racks at TJ Maxx, now she’s trying to relaunch that failed brand with tax payer money while exposing people to COVID (and bragging about it on social media from the Hamptons). You claim to be a business podcast? Pass.

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