3 episodes

Collegiate Seminar courses at Saint Mary's College of California aim to help students learn to think for themselves. The idea is that we learn to think for ourselves, not by listening to lectures, but by working through questions we care about, in dialogue with each other, and a few great texts from within and outside the Western traditions. These podcasts offer a glimpse of Seminar. Listen in as Saint Mary's professors, students, and guests discuss Seminar texts and the questions they still raise today.

The Great Conversation: Collegiate Seminar at Saint Mary's Julie Park

    • Courses

Collegiate Seminar courses at Saint Mary's College of California aim to help students learn to think for themselves. The idea is that we learn to think for ourselves, not by listening to lectures, but by working through questions we care about, in dialogue with each other, and a few great texts from within and outside the Western traditions. These podcasts offer a glimpse of Seminar. Listen in as Saint Mary's professors, students, and guests discuss Seminar texts and the questions they still raise today.

    Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart

    Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart

    Things Fall Apart is a novel written in 1958 by the Nigerian novelist Chinua Achebe. The novel tells the stories of people and life in an Igbo village both before and after the arrival in Nigeria of Christian missionaries and administrators from the British colonial empire.

    Hosted by David Arndt, Tutor, Integral Liberal Arts.

    With Ed Biglin, Professor of English; Claude-Rhéal Malary, Professor of Modern Languages; and Joseph Zepeda, Tutor and Director, Integral Liberal Arts.

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Plato, The Allegory of the Cave

    Plato, The Allegory of the Cave

    The first text that students read in Collegiate Seminar is a story written by the philosopher Plato around 380 BC, which is commonly known as the Allegory of the Cave. On a literal level, it’s a story about prisoners shackled to the bedrock of an underground cave, and about how some of these prisoners are able to free themselves from their shackles and make their way up out of the cave and into the light of the sun. On an allegorical level, the story is about what it means to be human, and what it means to be educated or uneducated. But what exactly is Plato’s understanding of education? How might it illuminate the aims of higher education today?
    Hosted by Julie Park, Visiting Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts, Collegiate Seminar.
    With Steve Cortright, Professor of Philosophy and Tutor, Integral Liberal Arts; Patrick Downey, Professor of Philosophy; and David Arndt, Lecturer, Collegiate Seminar and Tutor, Integral Liberal Arts.

    • 50 min
    Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

    Shakespeare, Measure for Measure

    In 1603, William Shakespeare wrote a play called Measure for Measure, a dark comedy about law, justice, mercy, and forgiveness. What does the play dramatize or convey? How might the play illuminate our lives and the world in which we live today? Hosted by David Arndt, Lecturer, Collegiate Seminar and Tutor, Integral Liberal Arts. With Hilda Ma, Professor of English, Ellen Rigsby, Professor of Communication and Director, Collegiate Seminar, and Eric Ting, Artistic Director, California Shakespeare Theatre.

    • 1 hr 8 min

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