75 episodes

Harry Glorikian is an investor and business expert at the convergence of health, life sciences, and IT. His books show how technology is transforming healthcare, from both the patient's point of view (The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer, 2021) and the industry insider's perspective (MoneyBall Medicine, 2017). He's also a natural at conversation. And here on the podcast, you'll hear Harry talking with the pioneers who are using technologies like AI, big data, predictive analytics, and wearable devices to change the way healthcare gets delivered and get consumers more engaged in their own health.

The Harry Glorikian Show Harry Glorikian

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0 • 35 Ratings

Harry Glorikian is an investor and business expert at the convergence of health, life sciences, and IT. His books show how technology is transforming healthcare, from both the patient's point of view (The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer, 2021) and the industry insider's perspective (MoneyBall Medicine, 2017). He's also a natural at conversation. And here on the podcast, you'll hear Harry talking with the pioneers who are using technologies like AI, big data, predictive analytics, and wearable devices to change the way healthcare gets delivered and get consumers more engaged in their own health.

    Seqster's Ardy Arianpour on How To Smash Health Data Siloes

    Seqster's Ardy Arianpour on How To Smash Health Data Siloes

    Your medical records don't make pleasant bedtime reading. And not only are they inscrutable—they're often mutually (and deliberately) incompatible, meaning different hospitals and doctor's offices can't share them across institutional boundaries. Harry's guest this week, Ardy Arianpour, is trying to fix all that. He’s the co-founder and CEO of Seqster, a San Diego company that’s spent the last five years working on ways to pull patient data from all the places where it lives, smooth out all the formatting differences, and create a unified picture that patients themselves can understand and use.

    • 58 min
    Why AI-based Computational Pathology Detects More Cancers

    Why AI-based Computational Pathology Detects More Cancers

    Chances are you or someone you love has had a biopsy to check for cancer. Doctors got a tissue sample and they sent it into a pathology lab, and at some point you got a result back. If you were lucky, it was negative and there was no cancer. But have you ever wondered exactly what happens in between those steps? Until recently, it’s been a meticulous but imperfect manual process where a pathologist would put a thin slice of tissue under a high-powered microscope and examine the cells by eye, looking for patterns that indicate malignancy. But now the process is going digital—and growing more accurate.

    • 49 min
    Nanowear's Venk Varadan on the Next-Gen of Wearable Technology

    Nanowear's Venk Varadan on the Next-Gen of Wearable Technology

    Many of us wear wireless, battery-powered medical sensors on our wrists in the form of our smartwatches or fitness trackers. But someday soon, similar sensors may be woven into our very clothing. Harry's guest this week, Nanowear CEO Venk Varadan, explains that his company's microscopic nanosensors, when embedded in fabric and worn against the skin, can pick up electrical changes that reveal heart rate, heart rhythms, respiration rate, and physical activity and relay the information to doctors in real time. Nanowear’s leading product is a sash called SimpleSense that fits over the shoulder and around the torso, and last month the company won FDA approval for the software package that goes with the SimpleSense sash and turns it into a diagnostic and predictive device.

    • 53 min
    A New Era of Participatory Medicine: Talking with E-Patient Dave, Part 2

    A New Era of Participatory Medicine: Talking with E-Patient Dave, Part 2

    Today we bring you the second half of Harry's conversation with Dave deBronkart, better known as E-Patient Dave for all the work he’s done to help empower patients to be more involved in their own healthcare. In Part 1, we talked about how Dave’s own brush with cancer in 2007 turned him from a regular patient into a kind of super-patient, doing the kind of research to find the medication that ultimately saved his life. And we heard from Dave how the healthcare system in the late 2000s was completely unprepared to help consumers like him who want to access and understand their own data. Today in Part 2, we’ll talk about how all of that is gradually changing, and why new technologies and standards have the potential to open up a new era of participatory medicine – if, that is, patients are willing to do a little more work to understand their health data, if innovators can get better access to that data, and if doctors are willing to create a partnership with the patients over the process of diagnosis and treatment.

    • 44 min
    E-Patient Dave Says We Still Need Better Access to our Health Data

    E-Patient Dave Says We Still Need Better Access to our Health Data

    The podcast is back with a new name and a new, expanded focus! Harry will soon be publishing his new book "The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer." Like his previous book "MoneyBall Medicine," it's all about AI and the other big technologies that are transforming healthcare. But this time Harry takes the consumer's point of view, sharing tips, techniques, and insights we can all use to become smarter, more proactive participants in our own health. The show's first guest under this expanded mission is Dave deBronkart, better known as "E-Patient Dave" for his relentless efforts since 2007 to persuade medical providers to cede control over health data and make patients into more equal partners in their own care.

    • 50 min
    How Matthew Might Is Using Computation to Fight Rare Diseases

    How Matthew Might Is Using Computation to Fight Rare Diseases

    Harry's guest this week is Matthew Might, director of the Hugh Kaul Precision Medicine Institute at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Might trained as a computer scientist, but a personal odyssey inspired him to make the switch into precision medicine. Now he uses computational tools such as knowledge graphs and natural language processing to find existing drug compounds that might help cure people with rare genetic disorders.

    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
35 Ratings

35 Ratings

Appa-Amma ,

Nanowear’s Venk Varadan on the next-gen of wearable tech

Excellent talk, Venk! We are very proud of you!

e-Patient Dave ,

Data’s transforming your care. Great insights

I have a deep stake in this subject, because when I nearly died of stage IV cancer, my oncologist says that being proactively involved helped save my life, and I’ve since learned that a BIG part of medicine is about having and leveraging information. More than any other I’ve seen, this series understands that and is digging into the how and why.

I’ve subsequently given hundreds of speeches (as a patient) around the world, to hundreds of audiences in dozens of countries, so I’ve experienced how medical professionals think and hear new messages. I think this podcast presents the issues in a way open minds can hear and get value from.

Gr8well ,

Excellent insights into the minds of healthcare tech leaders

This podcast provides an unusually deep analysis and explanation of some leading edge healthcare innovations. It’s like getting a peek at the future.

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