17 episodes

The Heart Gallery Podcast brings you artists and creators that confront the issues of our time, help us create deeper relationships with other inhabitants of this planetary home, & inspire compelling visions of the future. Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer is the creator and host of The Heart Gallery Podcast. She is an illustrator and creative education strategist, and works primarily with humanitarian, climate, and social change organizations. She also has a studio art practice where she applies lessons from her podcast guests and her surroundings.

The Heart Gallery Podcast Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

The Heart Gallery Podcast brings you artists and creators that confront the issues of our time, help us create deeper relationships with other inhabitants of this planetary home, & inspire compelling visions of the future. Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer is the creator and host of The Heart Gallery Podcast. She is an illustrator and creative education strategist, and works primarily with humanitarian, climate, and social change organizations. She also has a studio art practice where she applies lessons from her podcast guests and her surroundings.

    Tara DePorte on envisioning enticing futures and meaningful climate opportunities

    Tara DePorte on envisioning enticing futures and meaningful climate opportunities

    A recurring theme on the podcast is the climate crisis and the ways in which artists are addressing it in their work. Whether they're focused on showing ways forward for society, making the issue more concrete for individuals and specific communities, or inviting people sideways into the issue through art that is focused on elements of celebration, curiosity, care. If you listen to the podcast often, you know the last one is my personal favorite type.
     Tara DePorte is the guest on the podcast today. She is Executive Director of the Human Impacts Institute, which is building a global cultural movement around climate action. In addition to leading HHI, Tara is also well versed as an artist in climate policy and science spaces. In that way, she and I have quite a bit in common, which is a rare thing. Art is entering climate spaces more and more, but it still feels serendipitous to connect with others who have similar approaches, so I’m thrilled to be talking to her.
    Tara is so clear-sighted about the challenges of climate communication and climate art. I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as did.

    Homework from Tara: "Find a group in your community that you're really excited about, that is doing work on climate in some way. And climate does not have to be in their title or the description of their mission. It can be a community garden. It can be something that's helping give girls, children, access to education.  There are many different ways to engage. Connect with them, learn about them, and find a way to be a part of it by coming back to that idea of "give who you are". So have it be something that  you're going to look forward to doing, that you could bring your kids to do as well, like making a community mural.

    It's easy to feel alone in the world in general these days. In order to come back to a place of empathy and creation and inspiration, we really need to acknowledge how important community is in our lives. And I can speak on behalf of myself; I need to acknowledge how important community is in my life.  I think the same thing goes for climate action. Going out and doing it on our own not only doesn't have as much of an impact, it's easy to get burned out or feel like we're not making enough of a difference. So start that climate community, find that climate community."

    Mentioned:
    - The City Tree, by Shira Boss, Lorena Alvarez
    - The New Humanitarian podcast episode on sci fi

    Connect:
    - Human Impacts Institute website
    - Human Impacts Institute instagram
    - Tara's Art Portfolio
    - The Heart Gallery instagram
    - The Heart Gallery website
    - Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer

    Credits:
    Samuel Cunningham for podcast editing, Cosmo Sheldrake for use of his song Pelicans We, podcast art by me, Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer.

    • 1 hr
    Métis artist Christi Belcourt on how to "make things right" in Canada

    Métis artist Christi Belcourt on how to "make things right" in Canada

    This episode of The Heart Gallery will take you into the history and ongoing realities of Indigenous affairs in Canada. Recent years have shed light on a painful and violent history, as well as present-day systemic challenges. From the harrowing legacy of the residential school system, which remained active until the 1990s, to the continuous struggles over land rights and cultural preservation, these unfolding revelations have sparked crucial national and international dialogues. They compel us to face uncomfortable truths and prompt a critical re-examination of the process of truth and reconciliation.

    Against this backdrop, I’m privileged to interview Christi Belcourt, an artist whose work is deeply entwined with her Métis community's stories. Christi’s art does not merely reflect Métis cultural practices and deep connection to nature; it resonates with the ongoing struggles and triumphs of indigenous people, offering a window into the soul of communities striving for justice.

    We explore Christi's work while also talking about how the arts can be a conduit for expressing Indigenous voices and can play a valuable role in efforts to reveal systemic challenges.

    I hope you enjoy this conversation.

    Homework from Christi: "Do something that is completely selfless - and anonymous - in the aid of someone else."

    Mentioned:
    - Keetsahnak: our missing and murdered Indigenous sisters, edited by Christi Belcourt
    - Medicines to help us: traditional Metis plant us, by Christi Belcourt
    - Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists exhibit
    - Bob Marley's War
    - Haile Selassie's speech Towards African unity, 1963
    - Classically trained indigenous pianist Jeremy Dutcher
    - Gregory Schofield, Canadian Métis poet, beadwork artist, dramatist and non-fiction writer.
    - Odawa-Potawatomi artist Daphne Odjig
    - And please see the blog post for visual accompaniment

    Connect:
    - Christi twitter
     - Christi instagram
    - The Heart Gallery Instagram
    - The Heart Gallery website
    - Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer Instagram

    Credits:
    Samuel Cunningham for podcast editing, Cosmo Sheldrake for use of his song Pelicans We, podcast art by me, Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer.

    • 1 hr 18 min
    Beyond the crisis: Justin Cook on climate stories that truly captivate

    Beyond the crisis: Justin Cook on climate stories that truly captivate

    In today's episode, Justin Cook takes us into the evolving world of climate storytelling where he's been a journalist and photographer covering "communities living along the edges in America" for the past several years. Justin's work stands in stark contrast to the conventional climate storytelling landscape that's so often dominated by dire predictions and a sense of impending doom.  In today's conversation, hear about how it matters so dearly to weave life, joy, color, humanity, and history into coverage on the communities most affected by the climate crisis.

    Homework from Justin: "Just go outside today and enjoy where you are, just slow down a little bit." And, "Go play in a creek somewhere. You might just find a fossil." (You'll just have to listen to the episode for more about that).

    Mentioned:
    - Justin's Tide and Time
    - Justin's ORIGINS: Climate Change and Solutions in Princeville, North Carolina, America's Oldest Incorporated Black Town
    - Photographer Cornell Watson
    - Writer Alexis Pauline Gums
    - Photographer Natalie Keyssar

    Connect:
    - Justin's website
    - Justin's Instagram
    - The Heart Gallery Instagram
    - The Heart Gallery website
    - Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer Instagram

    Credits:
    Samuel Cunningham for podcast editing, Cosmo Sheldrake for use of his song Pelicans We, podcast art by me, Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer.

    • 56 min
    What good can a museum do for global society? With Pascal Hufschmid

    What good can a museum do for global society? With Pascal Hufschmid

    In today's escalating humanitarian crises, the term itself is complex, influenced by various factors. The United Nations reports 235 million people needing humanitarian help, nearly double from a decade ago. These crises and the treatment of them, often rooted in colonialism, affect everything from resources to power structures, and, as discussed in the episode with Patrick Gathara, may perpetuate biased narratives by overlooking systemic issues.

    Against this context, Pascal Hufschmid reimagines the role of the museum. Merging art with humanitarianism, his work as Director of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum transforms the museum into a platform for critical societal discussions. With a background in ballet, art history, and as a United Nations tour guide, and with his commitment to art's transformative power, Pascal brings a unique perspective on these pressing matters.

    HW from Pascal: Be kind to yourself. That's all I have to say. I think it's so important and so true, every day. There's big research we're conducting right now in the museum with the Swiss Center for Affective Sciences. When visiting our permanent exhibition, there's a big wall with a simple question stated: "are you kind to yourself?". And we invite people to write a message of kindness to themselves and to put it up on the wall. We've received something like 10,000 messages in six months, messages that are being analyzed by two researchers who in their postdoctoral research are studying if self compassion can be taught, and what impact it has on conflicts. They're specifically studying this in the context of the conflict between Israel and Palestine: can self-compassion actually put an end to the dehumanizing process that has a soldier [choose] to kill someone, to wipe out the specificities of this person. Also, how that that dehumanization process actually helps one live with themself after what they've done. And that is hardcore research being carried out right now. And with them, we're working at the museum to invite our visitors to reflect upon self-kindness. You know, "are you okay with yourself?" ,"How can you be kind to yourself?". And these 9,000, 10,000 messages were collectively with the researchers, and it's going to be published next year: a daily self-practice guide to compassion. So yes: be kind to yourself."

    Mentioned:
    - 10 Ideas for a Caring Museum
    - Henri Cartier-Bresson and his Leica
    - Dino Buzzati

    Connect:
    - Pascal Hufschmid LinkedIn
    - International Red Cross & Red Crescent Museum Twitter
    - International Red Cross & Red Crescent Museum Instagram
    - The Heart Gallery Instagram
    - The Heart Gallery website

    Credits:
    Samuel Cunningham for podcast editing, Cosmo Sheldrake for use of his song Pelicans We, podcast art by me

    • 55 min
    Lingering in the sun with Gaelynn Lea

    Lingering in the sun with Gaelynn Lea

    For the 12th episode of The Heart Gallery, I am in conversation with Gaelynn Lea.  Gaelynn, a violinist and songwriter who won NPR Music’s Tiny Desk Contest in 2016, has a unique perspective on the challenges and opportunities in the music industry, especially for disabled artists. She has performed over 600 shows in 45 states and 9 countries, but her path hasn't been without obstacles. And according to Gaelynn, 26% of Americans have some type of disability, yet the music industry is far from being fully accessible or inclusive.

    Here, Gaelynn talks about accessibility in the music industry, the problem with disability-based "inspiration", and creating transformative art. We also have a surprise for you: three of Gaelynn's songs are featured throughout the conversation. I am sure you will love this episode…

    HW from Gaelynn:  "I would say, look up those three artists I mentioned (shared below) because they're all really good. If you haven't heard a lot of disabled artists, I think there's maybe a subconscious misconception that you have to be disabled to like their music, but that is not true. They're just so good. So, look them up and then check out rampd.org, because there's around 60 artists right now as a part of RAMPD and it continues to grow. And so if you're ever feeling stuck in a musical rut, go check it out because they cover all genres."

    Artists mentioned:
    - Wheelchair Sports Camp
    -Ruth Lyon
    - Eliza Hull
    - Charlie Parr
    - Recording Artists and Musical Professionals with Disabilities (RAMPD)

    Connect:
    - Gaelynn Lea Patreon
    - Gaelynn Lea website
    - Gaelynn Lea Spotify
    - The Heart Gallery Instagram
    - The Heart Gallery website
    - Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer Instagram
    Credits:
    Samuel Cunningham for podcast editing, Cosmo Sheldrake for use of his song Pelicans We, podcast art by me, Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer.

    • 1 hr 30 min
    Inclusive storytelling from Gaza and beyond with Patrick Gathara - Part 2

    Inclusive storytelling from Gaza and beyond with Patrick Gathara - Part 2

    This is the second part of my conversation with Patrick Gathara. In this segment, we continue to dissect inclusive storytelling and its critical role in understanding humanity - both that of the world as well as our own.  We cover the genocide in Gaza, inclusive stories from other context, the problems of western media today, and how to go beyond "the single story".

    HW from Patrick: "The one thing I would ask audiences to do is to read up and to read up especially on history. You find very interesting things when you look even at the most ordinary things, the assumptions that you make. Let me tell you one that happened to me. I'm born in Kenya, brought up in this society where I was taught that there are things called tribes, that we are all divided into these 42 communities. And I've been there for eons - these age-old identities that we've had. But it doesn't take much to actually debunk it. It really just takes a curious manner to ask, "all right, where did that come from?".  You read a bit and you find there's loads of research that's been done into this evolution of identity. You start learning how lots of what we think of as ethnic communities, if you were to go just a hundred years ago,  the people who had that brand, who had that name, who had that identity, might not even recognize that. We've been taught in Kenya today that "tribe" is this totalizing identity. It captures everything, from your politics to how you live, to how you dress. Then you find, for a lot of these guys, it didn't really matter much. It was understood as a very fluid thing, while today we are being told it is kind of encoded in your genes. So understanding how the world has been made, how you have been taught to see it, through history, through your thinking about the world, it can be a really liberating experience. So, I would urge your listeners to engage in that, to think of something that they think is really important to them, that really defines them, and to ask, "why do I think that?" "Where does that come from?".  To go into it and research it. And I think you will find many times that there is much more we have in common than the things that we think define us."

    Mentioned by Patrick:
    - WhatsApp, Lebanon?
    - The Yemen Listening Project
    - Writer Shailja Patel and her book Migritude
    - Cartoonist Gado
    - Cartoonist Paul "Maddo" Kelemba

    Connect:
    - Patrick's Twitter
    - The New Humanitarian
    - The Heart Gallery Instagram
    - The Heart Gallery website
    - Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer Instagram
    Credits:
    Samuel Cunningham for podcast editing, Cosmo Sheldrake for use of his song Pelicans We, podcast art by me, Rebeka Ryvola de Kremer.

    • 45 min

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