2 episodes

The Legal Play is a show that takes on todays' tough legal challenge and talks though the law. The topics covered include business law, tax law, real estate law, probate as well as other topics that are relevant in today's society. This is not a legal advise show and should not be perceived as such but rather an open discussion on the law and its applications. Hap May is the owner of the May Firm if Houston Texas

The Legal Play Hap May

    • Business

The Legal Play is a show that takes on todays' tough legal challenge and talks though the law. The topics covered include business law, tax law, real estate law, probate as well as other topics that are relevant in today's society. This is not a legal advise show and should not be perceived as such but rather an open discussion on the law and its applications. Hap May is the owner of the May Firm if Houston Texas

    Ep 102: Capital Gains and Real Estate Tax Law Planning

    Ep 102: Capital Gains and Real Estate Tax Law Planning

    With a new tax plan from the current White House administration becoming a distinct possibility, it leaves many Americans wondering about capital gains as it applies to real estate transactions. With the plan still in the discussion phase, there are few concrete details about what new capital gains rates could eventually be if it were to go through, but even the likelihood of the plan passing has many people asking what they can do to maximize their investments.

    In terms of selling a personal residence or real estate that is held for investment or business use, it is crucial to look at what capital gains rates have been, and what they could be sometime soon.













    Capital Gains Rates Now

    Until the law concerning capital gains rates is changed, the rates are typically 15 to 20 percent depending upon whether an individual makes more than $250,000 or not. In addition to this, there is 3.8% that gets added to that investment income coming out of Obamacare for people who make more than $250,000.

    The capital gains rate is 15% for people who:



    * make $400,000 or less if they are single

    * make $450,000 or less if they are married



    And in addition, an individual making more than $250K a year has a 3.8% Obamacare net investment income tax added to that. Prior to this year, the maximum gain someone would be required to pay on a capital gains transaction is 23.8% which is essentially the 20% plus the 3.8%.













    Capital Gains Rates and the Future

    During the last year and a half and even prior to that, the government has spent a great deal of money due to COVID and other reasons. Because of this significant uptick in spending, it is not inconceivable that Americans will see a tax increase.

    The new administration has already proposed an aggressive tax increase that would raise capital gains rates significantly, to as high as the mid-40s. While this is possible, some consider it even more likely that instead of the rates going from 23.8% to the 44%, the tax hike will instead put the maximum rate at 28%. This rate would only be reached with compromise.

    America has had capital gains rates in the past of 28% so it is possible they will see them again if the tax plan passes. In light of this, it could be prudent for investors who are looking at potentially large capital gains transactions to anticipate a 28% rate in the near future.

    Realistically, an individual who sells something now will continue to be at the lower tax rate, but if they decide to sell it toward the end of the year or after, it could very well be at a much higher rate.













    The Potential Effect of Higher Capital Gains Rates on the Market

    The fact that Americans are anticipating higher capital gains rates has had an effect on the market to a certain extent. Most people who are facing capital gains transactions have one of two reactions:



    * “I need to do it now while the rates are lower.”

    * “I’m not going to sell that stock or real estate ever because I’m not going to pay that kind of tax.”



    The second reaction is particularly disheartening because this is not the desired effect. The goal is to still have individuals be able to sell their assets when they can and change their portfolio and doing so without having to play some sort of tax game with the respect to their business and investment decisions.

    Personal Residences and Capital Gains Rates

    A personal residence is only taxable to the extent that the gain on the house exceeds $250,000 for a single individual or $500,000 for a married couple.

    For example, if a person and their spouse bought a house for $400,000 ten years ago and are now selling it for $800,000,

    • 10 min
    What Happens When a Business Owner Dies

    What Happens When a Business Owner Dies

    Although it is not a welcome prospect, things to consider before a business owner dies are critical in the here and now. If you are a business owner who has not yet given thought to what will happen to the company you have worked so hard for, you risk losing everything for yourself as well as any potential beneficiaries. Estate planning is not just for individuals, it is essential for business owners as well. To protect all that you have built in assets, relationships, and more, it is advised for you to meet with an estate planning attorney as soon as possible so your legacy does not go unsecured.

    What Happens to a Corporation When the Business Owner Dies?

    In the unfortunate event that a business owner dies, one of the most frequently asked questions by personnel and relatives is, “What will happen to the business?” To a degree, this depends on how it is classified. For example, a corporation or limited liability company does not die, even if the owner does.



    A corporation can live until it is either:



    * Voluntarily terminated by filing papers with the state of the corporation

    * Terminated by the state for issues with creditors, failure to file the proper forms, or failure to pay a state franchise tax



    Aside from the above, a corporation should continue to exist even if the president or sole shareholder of the company dies.

    Why Wills Are Important for Corporation Stocks

    Corporations have stocks, and if the owner who owned all or even the majority of that stock dies, the stock then becomes an asset that is subject to probate. This means that the person’s will can determine who will get his or her corporation stocks in the event of their death.



    In addition to having a will, some owners may choose to put corporate stock into a trust, as in some cases this can avoid probate and keep a business from ceasing to operate. If upon their death an owner wants to give stock to charity, that can be done through a will or a combination of a will and a trust. It is important to discuss this with your lawyers and accountants before taking action as sometimes there can be more advantage to making charitable contributions before death.



    Giving advance thought to who will get the corporation stocks if a business owner dies is critical for both the individual’s and company’s wellbeing. Because life is unpredictable and we are not promised tomorrow, it requires both parties to be proactive now, regardless of the age or health of the owner.

    The Importance of Securing a Successor Now

    Business owners often have strong relationships with employees, customers, suppliers, and government agencies, and in the event that the owner passes, those relationships must be able to be maintained in their absence.



    Many companies mistakenly do not consider that it could take some time for the business to recover from the death of an owner because that person may have acted as the primary agent in:



    * Bringing in business

    * Collecting monies owed

    * Fulfilling contracts



    The result is that in some cases a business owner can be difficult to replace. At the very least it may require time and money to do so. For this reason, it can be beneficial to have insurance or enough cash stored away that this can be handled without waiting.



    For some businesses such as sales, accounting, and such, the owner’s personal relationship with a client or customer base is critical to the company’s success. In situations like these, when an owner passes it is not uncommon for employees or staff to panic and try to grab the business, form their own business, or take the practices and relationships to a new employer who will reward them.



    To keep the business from ending up this way after the owner’s death, it is important to make good use of covenants not to compete,

    • 15 min

Top Podcasts In Business