37 min

The Liturgy of Politics Jessup Think

    • Philosophy

Author Kaitlyn Schiess joins the show to discuss her recent book, The Liturgy of Politics: Spiritual Formation for the Sake of Our Neighbor.




TRANSCRIPT
0:01
Welcome to Jessup think I'm your host Mark Moore. We are so excited to welcome author Kaitlyn Schiess to the show today. She's the author of the liturgy of politics, spiritual formation for the sake of our neighbor, was released by InterVarsity press in September of 2020. She's a recent graduate of Dallas Theological Seminary and a current Ph.D student at Duke Divinity School. Faith and politics is such an important conversation for the church, we know you're going to get a lot out of the show today. Enjoy.

0:40
Thank you so much for for being on the show. And I'm a huge fan of liturgy. So when I saw your title, when it was recommended to me by my friend, Dan, the liturgy got me right away. And so I'd love maybe we can, we can start there by exploring how you how you're bringing these two concepts together, how you're applying this concept of liturgy, to the concept of politics.

1:05
Yeah, it was kind of a new word for me to have just like, realizing that the way that I grew up, the fact that there were so many things that were consistent, when I came to church were consistent in my life that were shaping me, I wouldn't have used that word to describe what was happening in my church, certainly, right, and what was happening in my life, you know, either. And so kind of coming to seminary and learning more about spiritual formation and kind of being exposed to different church traditions than the one that I grew up in. It was such a helpful word for me to realize that I was being shaped in church by the words that a pastor used or by the words of a song, but I was also being shaped by like, my physical posture. And the times when I would get up and go and, you know, have communion or the times when we would all say the same words together, or it made me think about the words of a song or the kind of motions we were going through in a different way. Whereas the way that I grew up, if I had heard the word liturgy, I probably would have thought, you know, that sounds old and stodgy and kind of, you know, ritualistic. And I mean, it's helpful language to say, you know, there are some church traditions that are more formal in their liturgy, but the churches I grew up and use the liturgy just as well, they had sort of a schedule a kind of rhythm for things. I was at my parents Church recently. And they do the same exact, you know, two songs, announcements, another song sermon. And that particular Sunday, they did one song, and the pastor who was preaching stood up and started preaching, and we all were like, What is

2:36
Yeah, well, he just changed the script once.

2:39
Yeah, yeah. So it was helpful to kind of realize, I want to be thoughtful, not just about those kinds of actual things like the sermon and the songs, those are important. But could I also be thoughtful about the order of things and the repetitive nature of things? And how am I being formed, not just by the things that I've typically been intentional about, but all of those other things as well?

3:06
Yeah. And so when you apply that to politics, how does that how does that maybe change how you approach politics?

3:14
Yeah, it was a really helpful word for me to think about politics to partially because so much of our political participation is more repetitive, and sort of like has all of these deeper meanings involved. Then some other things in our lives normally our you know, when we engage in politics, not only do most of us have sort of habits, about the media that we consume, even just the neighborhoods we live in the schools, we go to the grocery stores we shop at those are all kinds of community building things that are really kind of habits for us. If we have habits about political participation, right, like some of us are in the habit of voting or not, some o

Author Kaitlyn Schiess joins the show to discuss her recent book, The Liturgy of Politics: Spiritual Formation for the Sake of Our Neighbor.




TRANSCRIPT
0:01
Welcome to Jessup think I'm your host Mark Moore. We are so excited to welcome author Kaitlyn Schiess to the show today. She's the author of the liturgy of politics, spiritual formation for the sake of our neighbor, was released by InterVarsity press in September of 2020. She's a recent graduate of Dallas Theological Seminary and a current Ph.D student at Duke Divinity School. Faith and politics is such an important conversation for the church, we know you're going to get a lot out of the show today. Enjoy.

0:40
Thank you so much for for being on the show. And I'm a huge fan of liturgy. So when I saw your title, when it was recommended to me by my friend, Dan, the liturgy got me right away. And so I'd love maybe we can, we can start there by exploring how you how you're bringing these two concepts together, how you're applying this concept of liturgy, to the concept of politics.

1:05
Yeah, it was kind of a new word for me to have just like, realizing that the way that I grew up, the fact that there were so many things that were consistent, when I came to church were consistent in my life that were shaping me, I wouldn't have used that word to describe what was happening in my church, certainly, right, and what was happening in my life, you know, either. And so kind of coming to seminary and learning more about spiritual formation and kind of being exposed to different church traditions than the one that I grew up in. It was such a helpful word for me to realize that I was being shaped in church by the words that a pastor used or by the words of a song, but I was also being shaped by like, my physical posture. And the times when I would get up and go and, you know, have communion or the times when we would all say the same words together, or it made me think about the words of a song or the kind of motions we were going through in a different way. Whereas the way that I grew up, if I had heard the word liturgy, I probably would have thought, you know, that sounds old and stodgy and kind of, you know, ritualistic. And I mean, it's helpful language to say, you know, there are some church traditions that are more formal in their liturgy, but the churches I grew up and use the liturgy just as well, they had sort of a schedule a kind of rhythm for things. I was at my parents Church recently. And they do the same exact, you know, two songs, announcements, another song sermon. And that particular Sunday, they did one song, and the pastor who was preaching stood up and started preaching, and we all were like, What is

2:36
Yeah, well, he just changed the script once.

2:39
Yeah, yeah. So it was helpful to kind of realize, I want to be thoughtful, not just about those kinds of actual things like the sermon and the songs, those are important. But could I also be thoughtful about the order of things and the repetitive nature of things? And how am I being formed, not just by the things that I've typically been intentional about, but all of those other things as well?

3:06
Yeah. And so when you apply that to politics, how does that how does that maybe change how you approach politics?

3:14
Yeah, it was a really helpful word for me to think about politics to partially because so much of our political participation is more repetitive, and sort of like has all of these deeper meanings involved. Then some other things in our lives normally our you know, when we engage in politics, not only do most of us have sort of habits, about the media that we consume, even just the neighborhoods we live in the schools, we go to the grocery stores we shop at those are all kinds of community building things that are really kind of habits for us. If we have habits about political participation, right, like some of us are in the habit of voting or not, some o

37 min