49 min

The Many Paths of Pathogens with Dr. Philip Hardwidge, associate director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Something to Chew On - Global Food Systems at Kansas State University

    • Natural Sciences

In this episode, we host Dr. Philip Hardwidge, associate director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases in the Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology at Kansas State University. Dr. Hardwidge’s research focuses on understanding, treating and preventing diarrheal disease caused by bacterial pathogens. These pathogens represent important threats to food safety, biosecurity and animal health. His research team is tackling the fundamentals of biochemical interactions, leading to a better understanding of mitigation methods.  
 
Transcript:
The Many Paths of Pathogens with Dr. Philip Hardwidge, associate director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
We have to be as scientists extremely open and and generally willing to share data be transparent about our
raw data and like other aspects in life know when to ask for help.
[Music]

Something to chew on is a podcast devoted to the exploration and discussion of global food systems produced by the Office of Research Development at Kansas State University. I'm Maureen Olewnik. Coordinator of Global Food Systems.

I'm Scott Tanona. I'm a philosopher of Science.

We welcome back co-host Dr. Jim Stack Professor of Plant Pathology.
Diarrheal disease caused by bacterial pathogens is a challenge in both humans and animals in many instances the introduction of pathogens in animal systems causes illness and in some cases is carried through meat processing affecting contamination of food meant for human consumption. Studies of food safety at K-State includes fundamental through applied research. The importance of research in the area of pathogenic bacteria has been addressed in several of our podcasts to date. Most focusing on the applied research in testing, monitoring, and mitigating potential contamination of food products. However, the basic molecular biology of host pathogen interaction is not well understood. In today's podcast, we will talk with Dr. Philip Hardwidge, Associate Director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases here at K-State. His study of host pathogen interaction has led to a better understanding of the mechanisms by which pathogens enter and colonize in a host system. With studies leading to an understanding of how this impacts autoimmune disorders, cancer, and more.

I would like to welcome Dr. Philip Hardwidge to the podcast. Dr. Hardwidge is the Associate Director of NIH and Cobra Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. I am hopeful that he will explain to us exactly what all that means. Before we get started in talking about your current activities, Dr. Hardwidge could we maybe get a little bit of understanding of who you are, what your background is, and what brought you to K-State. What brought you to the area of study that you're in, today.

Thanks for having me on this podcast series. I'm from the midwest, Michigan and Illinois. My father was a Pfizer scientist and we happened to be living in Central Illinois when I was a high school student, so he gave me some interest in Microbiology and Chemistry, so I ended up doing a Microbiology degree at the University of Illinois, and wanted to develop a research program kind of at the interface between Biochemistry and Microbiology, so I knew from a fairly early age where my career would hopefully head. I did a PHD at the Mayo Clinic Graduate School
in Rochester, Minnesota. So, Mayo is a very famous hospital. They also have a very robust graduate training program. And after that, I did a postdoc at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver Canada. Primarily because one of the leading E Coli Microbiologists was running his laboratory in Vancouver and when I finished my education I took an Assistant Professor Position in South Dakota State University back in 2005. There were some unique opportunities to help develop their graduate program, and I had the opportunity to work with germ-free piglets which are

In this episode, we host Dr. Philip Hardwidge, associate director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases in the Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology at Kansas State University. Dr. Hardwidge’s research focuses on understanding, treating and preventing diarrheal disease caused by bacterial pathogens. These pathogens represent important threats to food safety, biosecurity and animal health. His research team is tackling the fundamentals of biochemical interactions, leading to a better understanding of mitigation methods.  
 
Transcript:
The Many Paths of Pathogens with Dr. Philip Hardwidge, associate director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases
We have to be as scientists extremely open and and generally willing to share data be transparent about our
raw data and like other aspects in life know when to ask for help.
[Music]

Something to chew on is a podcast devoted to the exploration and discussion of global food systems produced by the Office of Research Development at Kansas State University. I'm Maureen Olewnik. Coordinator of Global Food Systems.

I'm Scott Tanona. I'm a philosopher of Science.

We welcome back co-host Dr. Jim Stack Professor of Plant Pathology.
Diarrheal disease caused by bacterial pathogens is a challenge in both humans and animals in many instances the introduction of pathogens in animal systems causes illness and in some cases is carried through meat processing affecting contamination of food meant for human consumption. Studies of food safety at K-State includes fundamental through applied research. The importance of research in the area of pathogenic bacteria has been addressed in several of our podcasts to date. Most focusing on the applied research in testing, monitoring, and mitigating potential contamination of food products. However, the basic molecular biology of host pathogen interaction is not well understood. In today's podcast, we will talk with Dr. Philip Hardwidge, Associate Director of the Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases here at K-State. His study of host pathogen interaction has led to a better understanding of the mechanisms by which pathogens enter and colonize in a host system. With studies leading to an understanding of how this impacts autoimmune disorders, cancer, and more.

I would like to welcome Dr. Philip Hardwidge to the podcast. Dr. Hardwidge is the Associate Director of NIH and Cobra Center on Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. I am hopeful that he will explain to us exactly what all that means. Before we get started in talking about your current activities, Dr. Hardwidge could we maybe get a little bit of understanding of who you are, what your background is, and what brought you to K-State. What brought you to the area of study that you're in, today.

Thanks for having me on this podcast series. I'm from the midwest, Michigan and Illinois. My father was a Pfizer scientist and we happened to be living in Central Illinois when I was a high school student, so he gave me some interest in Microbiology and Chemistry, so I ended up doing a Microbiology degree at the University of Illinois, and wanted to develop a research program kind of at the interface between Biochemistry and Microbiology, so I knew from a fairly early age where my career would hopefully head. I did a PHD at the Mayo Clinic Graduate School
in Rochester, Minnesota. So, Mayo is a very famous hospital. They also have a very robust graduate training program. And after that, I did a postdoc at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver Canada. Primarily because one of the leading E Coli Microbiologists was running his laboratory in Vancouver and when I finished my education I took an Assistant Professor Position in South Dakota State University back in 2005. There were some unique opportunities to help develop their graduate program, and I had the opportunity to work with germ-free piglets which are

49 min