127 episodes

Artist Rebecca Crowell shares experiences and thoughts from three decades of painting, teaching and traveling, as well as her conversations with other artists. She is joined by her co-host, producer, and son, Ross Ticknor, who brings an entrepreneurial Millennial perspective. The conversations are broad and eclectic, focused on ideas, information and anecdotes that other artists may find helpful in their work and careers. A new episode is uploaded every Saturday!

The Messy Studio with Rebecca Crowell Rebecca Crowell

    • Arts
    • 4.8, 59 Ratings

Artist Rebecca Crowell shares experiences and thoughts from three decades of painting, teaching and traveling, as well as her conversations with other artists. She is joined by her co-host, producer, and son, Ross Ticknor, who brings an entrepreneurial Millennial perspective. The conversations are broad and eclectic, focused on ideas, information and anecdotes that other artists may find helpful in their work and careers. A new episode is uploaded every Saturday!

    Episode 127: Visual Language

    Episode 127: Visual Language

    Learning to use the visual elements and design principles in your work is often compared to acquiring vocabulary and then being able to use those words to communicate. It also means being able understand better what other artists have to say in their work. This understanding is basic and contributes to your growth for your whole artistic life. It also grows in tandem with intuitive responses and understanding. Yet many artists do not progress much beyond a limited vocabulary, used in only a few repeated combinations. Today we will give a perspective on the benefits of growing your visual vocabulary.


    It’s hard to progress as an artist without a good understanding of the basic concepts of the visual elements and design principles. Although learning about the visual elements and design prinicples can seem academic, a working knowledge of these widens your range of ideas, helps you to evaluate your work as you go, and helps establish personal voice and direction. Basic concepts are vital at any stage, and even very experienced artists benefit from revisiting them often along with changes in your work.


    So many aspects of art involve balancing different approaches, and it's important to note that intuition plays as much a role in manipulating elements of our work as does more objective knowledge. Knowledge itself is not inhibiting. It leads to understanding that is implanted in your creative approaches, a basis that once solid you can step away from more easily. Explore what works for you, starting with your natural inclinations toward particular elements and compositions. It is an exciting journey involving an infinite number of combinations and interactions,


    As a beginner, you can learn about the visual elements (line, color, value, shape, and texture) and the design principles (which describe ways of combining the visual elements into compositions) in many ways. You can find resources online, in books, and in workshops or classes. But practice and exploration in the studio are essential. Working not only with the elements and prinicples that appeal to you strongly but also those that are more difficult offers a lifetime of creative challenge and oppotunity.


    For more from The Messy Studio:
    www.messystudiopodcast.com
    www.facebook.com/messystudiopodcast


    For more from Rebecca Crowell:
    www.rebeccacrowell.com
    www.squeegeepress.com


    The Messy Studio is a CORE Publication MGMT production.

    • 33 min
    Episode 126: Handling Critique

    Episode 126: Handling Critique

    It can be very unsettling to put your work in front of someone else for a critique. We may fear harsh, judgmental comments. Yet the value of critique is exactly that, the chance to gain an outside perspective and insight, and very often criticism can be given and received in a supportive way. Today we’ll talk about the positive aspects of critique as well as handling negative criticism with regards to our work.


    First, let's distinguish between the meaning of the words, critique and criticism. The definition of critique is “a detailed analysis”, or as a verb “to evaluate.” This implies an objective point of view, not an attempt to find fault. Criticism has two meanings, One is “the expression of disapproval of someone or something based on perceived faults or mistakes.” The second meaning is “the analysis and judgment of the merits and faults of a literary or artistic work.” This meaning when applied to an art form includes positive as well as negative aspects, with an emphasis on judghement on the part of the person delivering it.


    The kind of criticism that hurts or stings, seems unfair, or completely off base is not likely to be of value. It probably springs from the other person’s ego or bias, or perhaps from a lack of understanding of your intentions. It is often one-sided and opinionated. Destructive criticism can have a powerful impact and unfortunately we tend to give negative comments more credit than the positive ones.


    But if what someone tells you seems true on some level, and has a basis in objective observation, critique can be extremely helpful. And critique is not limited to simply passing judgement. It is a way to delve into what you want as an artist especially if you seek it out when you are ready to engage with it. In addition to pointing out problems, a knowledgeable observer of your work can enable you to see things in a new and exciting way.


    Critique is best if it is a conversation and not a monologue in which you have no chance to respond and engage. It is also helpful if you establish some parameters ahead of time--deciding what you wish to show, setting the stage for a proper focus, and giving thought to what you hope to gain from the feedback. At the same time, being open and allowing a critique conversation to evolve and flow in accordance with the other person's thoughts may bring surprising and positive insight.


    Today's Episode is Sponsored by Multimedia Artboard:
    https://multimediaartboard.com/
    Check out their Memorial Day Sale and use promo code GOPAINT at checkout for 30% off!


    For more from The Messy Studio:
    www.MessyStudioPodcast.com
    www.facebook.com/MessyStudioPodcast


    For more from Rebecca Crowell:
    www.RebeccaCrowell.com
    www.SqueegeePress.com


    The Messy Studio Podcast is a CORE Publication MGMT production.

    • 39 min
    Episode 125: Art As Therapy

    Episode 125: Art As Therapy

    As we record this episode, a few months into the COVID-19 pandemic, there is much we don’t know—what the situation means in our own lives and in the world at large, how long it will last and what we will endure before it is over. How can our art practices help us through this difficult and anxious time? Today our podcast includes thoughts from two art therapists, Mimma Della Cagnoletta and Barbara Bagan, who generously shared their ideas about this topic via email.


    Artists are often said to be highly sensitive people. Being vulnerable, introspective, thoughtful about what we experience are all personality traits that help bring meaning and emotion to our work. But those same qualities can also cause us to be more unsettled than others around us. Are there also experiences we have as artists that can be helpful to us now?


    Artists are no strangers to uncertainty. We face it in the creative process every time we’re in the studio. This uncertainty is not comparable to the terrifying influence of the pandemic, of course. But we’ve been training our thoughts and emotions, often for years, to deal with the unknown. In fact, a characteristic of creative mindset is ability to deal with ambiguities and situations that are not clear-cut. Many of us are wired to adapt, and to bring our responses to difficult times into our work.


    As difficult as it may be, studies show that there are long-term benefits to facing and working through our emotions during trauma. These benefits include enhanced creativity and other kinds of personal growth. As Mimma Della Cagnoletta put it, “we know that making art is resilience in itself and affirms human capacity to deal with ‘the brutality of life.’”


    To quote Barbara Bagan, "Art plays a variety of therapeutic roles. Throughout history when going through intense experiences, especially where there are anxieties around mortality and what life really means, people turn to art. They turn to making art and beholding art. Accepting this current situation, even though we do not like it and rejuvenating ourselves in whatever ways we are comfortable with and creating again are what artists do."


    Article referenced in the podcast:
    https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/beautiful-minds/post-traumatic-growth-finding-meaning-and-creativity-in-adversity/


    For more from The Messy Studio:
    www.MessyStudioPodcast.com
    www.facebook.com/MessyStudioPodcast


    For more from Rebecca Crowell:
    www.RebeccaCrowell.com
    www.SqueegeePress.com

    • 29 min
    Episode 124: Voices Of Experience

    Episode 124: Voices Of Experience

    If you have ever had a really good art class, whether in school or a workshop, you probably retained some real gems of wisdom from the instructor. These may be specific things that were emphasized, or their overall teaching philosophy. These positive ideas and words have the power to shape our studio practices for our entire creative lives. We reached out to some art instructors, all friends of the Messy Studio Podcast, to ask them to share their insights and approaches to teaching, as well as how they motivate and inspire students to find their own direction.


    Teaching art is a work in progress, and most instructors see their messages evolve over time to be more supportive of students, as well as more challenging. The best art instructors have years of experience, and know what it takes to find a meaningful path because they have traveled that path themselves. Other instructors,however, have only enough experience to come up with something that works, and they teach in a formulaic way. They know what is true for them, but not how to help others find their own way.


    Meaningful art comes from personal experience. Teaching individuals involves guiding them to draw from their own well of resources, and requires the instructor to understand approaches other than their own. Students do need basic nuts and bolts information. However, they also need a wider context that goes beyond a one-size-fits-all teaching style.


    We asked several friends, colleagues, and former guests about their teaching approaches and advice and invite listeners to recall words of wisdom from their own art instructors.


    For more from The Messy Studio:
    www.MessyStudioPodcast.com
    www.facebook.com/MessyStudioPodcast


    For more from Rebecca Crowell:
    www.RebeccaCrowell.com
    www.SqueegeePress.com

    • 37 min
    Episode 123: A Call For Change

    Episode 123: A Call For Change

    Many artists are feeling stuck right now--not only in their homes in the midst of the COVID-19 stay-at-home orders but stuck in their work as well. We not only contend with our own worries and struggles but the constant drumbeat of bad news from the media. Our usual ways of working may no longer seem suited to what our lives have become.
    Historically, art reflects the times in which it is made. Today, we are considering this aspect of creativity in light of what we are all experiencing. The way in which we handle the current situation creatively can also be applied to other traumas that we experience in life.


    Artists usually consider personal voice to be a concentration of focus that carries us along. It helps others understand what it is that we are communicating. A consistent process, point of view, or approach is achieved through a mastery of technique and a deep, ongoing interest in particular ideas. Traumatic events can disrupt this flow, and change our focus. Now may be the time to loosen our concept of what constitutes our crative voice, and allow for different aspects of ourselves to come forth.


    Artists may wish to resist this natural change. There is so much disruption in life without having to completely change artistic direction. This change may also feel like a threat to the personal voice that has been developed through years of work and refinement. Or, in a positive light, our ongoing work may be something that can encompass the new reality, perhaps offering viewers something uplifting or comforting.


    This may, however, be the perfect time to explore something new as part of our ongoing journey. Art is a calling, and acknowledgeing that helps connect us with our roots, when we first started making art. For many us it is also a therapy, and during difficult times having a creative outlet may be more necessary than ever. This creative outlet does not need to be related to your current art practice, and can be purely an escape. The art you create at this time may never be shown to anyone else, but it may reveal new insights.


    Article referenced in this episode:
    https://www.sothebys.com/en/articles/for-the-love-of-art-alain-de-botton-on-art-as-therapy?fbclid=IwAR3BCqbEobPi7JXmEP_Ym0xYCA1QCVZnAp7xrd2KmyXzZy8kQeqL4QTJdUs


    For more fromt The Messy Studio:
    www.messystudiopodcast.com
    www.facebook.com/messystudiopodcast


    For more from Rebecca Crowell:
    www.rebeccacrowell.com
    www.squeegeepress.com

    • 35 min
    Episode 122: Sell More Art Online, Interview With Dave Geada

    Episode 122: Sell More Art Online, Interview With Dave Geada

    For the last several weeks we have faced an unknown and invisible enemy. COVID-19 has disrupted large portions of the international economy and thrown millions into unemployment. As artists we face these same challenges. Our galleries have closed, our workshops have been cancelled, and we have no idea when (or if) things will return to “normal”.


    However, we still have at our disposal the most powerful marketing and sales tool ever created. The internet is a way of selling art that many of us have ignored until recently and have no idea how to use properly. In the midst of economic chaos, it is crucial to learn to use the internet in ways that will help us sell more artwork, now and in the future.


    To explore some of the fundamentals of online marketing, we invited marketing professional Dave Geada to join us on the Messy Studio Podcast. What he taught us is deceptively simple: tell your story. We all have one, though we may not realize it. Dave emphasized that when people buy art, they are buying not only the work itself, but you and your story. That personal connection can make all the difference in a decision to purchase.


    Stories are like any other form of art. They contain essential elements that, when properly composed, are satisfying for the audience. In much the same way that a painter uses line, color, shape, form, value, texture, and space to create a painting, a storyteller uses characters, setting, plot, conflict, and resolution. A basic, archetypal storyline involves a hero/heroine who faces a villain (a person or other obstacle) and then triumphs with the help of a guide.


    This basic storyline can be applied to any person’s life and struggles. In the story of today's episode, our hero is the artist who faces the villain of COVID-19 and, with the help of a guide, learns to use the internet to sell their art. Our guide on today’s show is Dave Geada. He’s the CMO at[ Boldbrush (www.boldbrush.com) and has over 20 years of experience in technology and marketing. The interview provides some basic tools to start generating more art sales online, but if you want to learn more check out the special offer he has provided to Messy Studio listeners.


    To take advantage of Dave Geada's special offer for Messy Studio Listeners:
    https://l.faso.com/72


    For more from the Messy Studio:
    www.messystudiopodcast.com
    www.facebook.com/messystudiopocast


    For more from Rebecca Crowell:
    www.rebeccacrowell.com
    www.squeegeepress.com


    The Messy Studio is a CORE Publication MGMT production.
    Special Guest: Dave Geada.

    • 1 hr

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
59 Ratings

59 Ratings

loverainsound ,

A podcast not to miss!

Listening to these podcasts has been wonderful, especially during these very “isolated” times in this current world crisis. I feel like Rebecca and her son are sitting in my own living room! What a gift. I really appreciate their insights and honesty about living the life of creativity.

delusionfan ,

My favorite art podcast!

I have listened to many art podcasts, including Australian and British ones but this one is my favorite. Rebecca, in her extraordinarily soothing voice, has helped me gain a deeper understanding of where original art comes from when it is not meant to be representational. But I have learned from all the episodes and plan to show my gratitude in a small way when times are better.

luvabstraction ,

painterperson

I listen every week and appreciate the range of content and the viewpoiunt of a professional artist and her entrepreneurial son. They both offer a lto to think about!

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