100 episodes

Are you looking for financial freedom or more choices in life? You're in the right place. Each week Michael Yardney shares smart property investment strategies as well as the success and personal finance secrets of the rich, in 20 minutes or less.
While Michael is best known as a property expert, he is also Australia's leading experts in the psychology of success and wealth creation and a #1 best selling author of 8 books. He frequently challenges traditional finance advice with innovative ideas on real estate investing, personal finance and wealth creation.
His wisdom stems from his personal experience and from mentoring over 2,000 business people, investors and entrepreneurs over the last decade.
Michael's message will be priceless regardless of the size of your investment portfolio - whether you're just starting out or an experienced investor wanting to move to the next level, he will provide you a roadmap for real estate investing and financial success.
http://MichaelYardneyPodcast.com

The Michael Yardney Podcast Michael Yardney; Australia's authority in wealth creation through property

    • Investing
    • 5.0, 6 Ratings

Are you looking for financial freedom or more choices in life? You're in the right place. Each week Michael Yardney shares smart property investment strategies as well as the success and personal finance secrets of the rich, in 20 minutes or less.
While Michael is best known as a property expert, he is also Australia's leading experts in the psychology of success and wealth creation and a #1 best selling author of 8 books. He frequently challenges traditional finance advice with innovative ideas on real estate investing, personal finance and wealth creation.
His wisdom stems from his personal experience and from mentoring over 2,000 business people, investors and entrepreneurs over the last decade.
Michael's message will be priceless regardless of the size of your investment portfolio - whether you're just starting out or an experienced investor wanting to move to the next level, he will provide you a roadmap for real estate investing and financial success.
http://MichaelYardneyPodcast.com

    12 habits of highly successful people with Mark Creedon | Build a Business, Not a Job Podcast

    12 habits of highly successful people with Mark Creedon | Build a Business, Not a Job Podcast

    Success is no accident. 
    The most successful people in life may not always seem like they have much in common. 
    How are The Beatles similar to Steve Jobs? Or Warren Buffett and Shane Warne?
    But when their traits, habits, and work ethics are distilled down, these unlikely characters share many similarities.
    They do the work, they turn up, they believe in themselves and sometimes, they even wear the same clothes.
    In today’s Build a Business not a Job Podcast I chat with Mark Creedon, founder of Business Accelerator Mastermind about a dozen techniques to triumph.
    Drive – know where you’re going Whether it is the drive to be the best in the world at a specific skill – spin bowling – or the passion to build the most user-friendly tech experience at Apple, successful people are focused on their end goal.
    Proven losers Once people have the ability to spring back from their losses, they are more able to take the risks and challenges life inevitably throws out.
    And once that mindset is in place, coupled with a focus on achievement, a loss can create a gain.
    Let others do their part There is a necessary time to allow others into the business and to allow them to do the job in their way.
    By allowing others to take the load and share their knowledge, the outcome can be greater than the sum of its parts.
    Avoid distractions – from their goal and in daily life Achieving a distraction-free state of flow is the best and most efficient way to work and get things done.
    Communicate. Without it, ‘It’s like winking at a girl in the dark’ Berkshire Hathaway founder Warren Buffet says communication skills are the most important traits for success.
    “If you can’t communicate, somebody said, it’s like winking at a girl in the dark,” he says. “Nothing happens.”
    Break the mold Successful people are often willing to stand out.
    Test cricketer Stuart McGill says spin legend Shane Warne “broke the mold” in cricket, not only with his spin action but also with his off-field antics.
    This pairing of performance and personality brought new followers to the game.
    Think on your feet The ability to be agile and take chances – even if they fail – is a key habit of the successful.
    Let’s do it People who thrive see the outcome. They determine a course of action and set their minds to achieve it. 
    Routine is a common element for those who succeed.
    Yes, yes, yes, no. Make the decision Successful people are decisive. 
    They may not always be right, but at least they make a decision, which allows for a speedier process and new possibilities.
    ‘Done is better than perfect’ This leads on from decisiveness.
    The philosophy is about achieving small steps, not about sacrificing quality.
    As there is no such thing as perfection – which is different for different people – many successes consider milestones and progress more important than a mythical ideal.
    ‘I get knocked down, but I get up again’ Resilience is considered the most important characteristic for success.
    People will inevitably get knocked down, criticised, rejected, or considered wrong, but with stamina and grit, many people overcome.
    Old-fashioned hard work, turning up every day, gets results.
    T-shirt and jeans Many successful people have systematized their life to strip back distractions. 
    By either planning ahead or making a routine of everyday tasks, they can reclaim time and energy to think about other outcome-focused enterprises.
    Links and Resources: 
    Why not join Metropole’s Business Accelerator Mastermind
    Learn more about Mark Creedon – Business Coach to some of Australia’s leading entrepreneurs 
    Join us at Wealth Retreat late in 2020 in join- find and more and register your interest here 
    Shownotes plus more here: 12 habits of highly successful people with Mark Creedon | Build a Business,

    • 33 min
    Is now really a good time to buy property?

    Is now really a good time to buy property?

    The coronavirus crisis has transformed our markets back to buyers’ markets. But does that mean it’s a good time for you to buy property? 
    That’s what I’m going to discuss in today’s show, and in quite some detail. 
    Of course, like with most things in property, the answer is that it depends. 
    Are you buying a new home or an investment property? How secure is your job? How easy is it for you to get financing? 
    I’ve got a couple of interesting concepts that I’ll discuss during the podcast, but let me answer the question: yes, it’s a good time to buy property if you’re one of the lucky ones who remains financially secure. 
    Because if you buy well now, you could set yourself up for the growth that’s certainly going to come later this year. 
    But there are a lot of ifs and buts and maybes between now and then. 
    In this episode, I’ll give you more detail about what I see happening to the property market in the short and long-term, as well as some lessons we can learn from previous downturns. Hopefully, at the end of this episode, you’ll have some more clarity about what’s ahead. 
    What’s ahead if you decide to purchase property?
    Is now a good time to buy property?
    Should I hold off and wait for property values to fall further?
    What’s ahead for our economy and the property markets as Australia falls into recession?
    These are the type of questions I’m regularly answering for our clients at Metropole and for the many journalists who have been asked me for my opinion.
    And what I have been telling them is that our economy started the year with a little cold that progressed to the flu and now looks more like we have a case of economic pneumonia.
    What’s next?
    Based on my perspective having been involved in the property market for over 45 years, I believe the impact of this on our property market will ultimately be temporary. 
    Now, this view may be a little different from what others who are forecasting that property values will drop anywhere from 10 percent to 30 percent; but remember …this too shall pass.
    What will happen to our property markets will depend upon how long we are in lockdown, how soon our economy picks up, the level of unemployment, and importantly the level of consumer confidence coming out of our recession, which will be a good barometer of all the above factors.
    Of course, if Australia experiences are multiyear downturn, caused by the world economy imploding, then, of course, property values would drop considerably.
    I know some doomsayers are predicting this, but these are not the type of forecasts made by the credible economists I have been following.
    What will be the short-term effects of coronavirus on Australia’s housing markets?
    Clearly our housing markets won’t be immune to the Coronavirus economic fallout, but the impact on property values will depend on how long it will take to contain the virus.
    Transaction levels will be significantly impacted over the next two to three months with discretionary sellers staying out of the market.
    It really makes no sense to put your property on the market for sale at this time unless you really need to.
    However, there will always be nondiscretionary buyers and sellers who do need to transact over the next little while.
    It is likely that sellers will discount the price of their properties to conclude a sale, while buyers will take advantage of this to nab a bargain
    But this doesn’t mean property values will plummet.
    In fact, as an asset class, bricks and mortar has performed exceptionally well during previous economic shocks.
    This time around, with the banks giving mortgage deferments or holidays, it is unlikely that we will have a large number of forced or mortgagee sales that could undermine market confidence. 
    Many commentators are trying to compare the current markets predict how the current marke

    • 35 min
    Robert Kiyosaki Interview – Do what the 99% are not doing!

    Robert Kiyosaki Interview – Do what the 99% are not doing!

    My special guest today is Robert Kiyosaki author of the best-selling book  Rich Dad, Poor Dad.
    When Robert’s team reached out to me and asked me if I’d like to have him as a guest, I jumped at the opportunity, because I heard that he’s got a message that he wanted to share with Australians about the challenges for our economy ahead, and the opportunities on the other side of the downturn. 
    Now, I don’t agree with everything he has to say, but I respect that he’s taught millions of people about the basics of financial literacy, so I was keen to hear his opinions. 
    You’re going to enjoy the conversation as we talk a bit about his basic financial concepts before we get into deeper topics. 
    Although I don’t agree with everything Robert says, I thought I’d give him the courtesy of the airtime he deserves, then after my chat with him, I’m going to share my views. 
    So, be sure to listen to both sides of the discussion, and then you’ll be able to use that to inform your own views.
    Topics that Robert and I discussed:
    Why so few people are becoming financially independent Robert’s advice to people taking on too much debt The shadow banking system The Cashflow Quadrant What’s ahead for the average Australian’s financial future How bad Robert thinks the crisis is going to get Whether Robert’s predictions have become more pessimistic over time The upside Robert sees on the other end Factors other than resilience that it takes to be a successful entrepreneur Whether today’s technologies make it easier to get started in business What Robert thinks will happen to house prices in the capital cities Robert’s thoughts about superannuation What it was like dealing with Donald Trump before he was president Michael’s Thoughts on Robert's Interview
    Clearly Robert knows a bit about real estate in the United States, where the rules are very different, where the tax regimes are very different, where the markets are very different, where the way you invest is very different. 
    In previous podcasts, I’ve explained why Australian real estate is different from overseas, but many overseas gurus just don’t get it. In Australia, property markets are underpinned by the fact that 70% of properties are owned by homeowners, and half of them don’t even have a mortgage against their properties. 
    Of the other half, many are well ahead in their payments, while others are using their mortgage to support the purchase of investment properties that bring cash in. This is very different to overseas. 
    Australia really doesn’t have a debt problem – at least, not when it comes to real estate assets.
    Robert also suggests that your home is not an asset – meaning that it doesn’t bring money in, only expenses going out, so it’s a liability. And if you accept his definition of an asset, he’s right. 
    But that’s not my definition of an asset. It’s also not the common definition of an asset. 
    I believe a million dollars is an asset if you have it sitting in a bank, or even if you take it out and put it under your mattress. It’s an asset even with no cashflow. 
    Robert is a cashflow investor, and that’s what’s appropriate for the tax rules and the system in the United States, but it has not made people wealthy in Australia. 
    There are four ways to make money on residential real estate in Australia: 
    capital growth,  rental return,  tax benefits, and  manufacturing growth through renovation and development.  The most important of those is tax-free capital growth. Unfortunately, too many people look for cashflow from their residential real estate investment, and that’s just not how it works in Australia. 
    Similarly, Robert’s concerns about our superannuation funds not being fully funded are just not accurate. The average superannuation fund that you and I are part of are fully funde

    • 56 min
    The #1 factor that makes poor people rich | RICH HABITS, POOR HABITS Podcast

    The #1 factor that makes poor people rich | RICH HABITS, POOR HABITS Podcast

    There are many definitions of what it means to be rich. 
    In today’s podcast, we’re going to discuss the #1 factor that makes poor people rich. 
    Being rich is more a state of mind than a dollar amount, though – the rich can be poor and the poor can be rich. 
    Being rich is really more about having what you want and being able to enjoy your wealth. 
    You need a sense of balance, and true wealth isn’t about money or how many properties or shares you have. 
    You need your health. You need time to enjoy and appreciate things. You need somebody to love and someone to love you. You’ve got to have the ability to give back to the community. You need spirituality. You need to be able to grow and learn. 
    In these podcasts, I talk a lot about money, but money isn’t a zero-sum game. 
    One person’s wealth can’t stop you from becoming wealthy as well. 
    And in today’s episode, you’ll hear more about building the habits that can help you become wealthy. 
    How can poor people become rich?
    If no poor person on the face of the earth ever rose from poverty to wealth, you might have a case that it’s impossible to become rich if you were born and raised poor.
    But, reality paints a very different picture.
    There are thousands of poor people every day who become rich. 
    According to Forbes Magazine, just in America, there are approximately 1,700 working-class people a day who become millionaires.
    And, according to Tom Corley’s Rich Habits study, 41% of the 177 self-made millionaires he studied were born and raised in poverty.
    What was the #1 factor that helped them shake off the chains of poverty and become wealthy?
    Changing their daily habits.
    Changing your habits can be hard, especially if you don’t know how.  Here are some short-cuts to changing habits.
    Habit Merging
    When an old habit does not perceive a new habit as a threat, it does not wage war against the formation of the new habit.
    Law of Association
    Old habits can be triggered by the individuals you associate with.
    If you are trying to get rid of some old, bad habits you need to limit the time you spend associating with those individuals who act as a triggers for those bad habits and begin associating with individuals who possess the new good habits you are trying to adopt.
    You can find these new individuals in network groups, non-profit groups, trade groups or any group that is focused on pursuing similar goals.
    Changes in Your Environment
    It is much easier to abandon old habits and form new habits when your environment changes.  
    New home, new neighbors, new friends, new job, new colleagues, new cities, etc., all offer an opportunity to forge new habits.
    When your environment changes, you are forced to think your way through each day.
    Start Small
    It is far easier to change your habits if you start with small habits.
    Small habit change involves adding habits that require very little effort.  
    Examples include drinking more water during the day, taking vitamin supplements or listening to audiobooks while you commute to work.
    Schedule Your New Habits
    Sixty-seven percent of self-made millionaires in my study maintained a to-do list.
    To-do lists are a way of processing success into your life.  
    One of the tricks self-made millionaires use is to incorporate certain good daily habits onto their to-do list.
    Firewall Your Bad Habits
    One trick to habit change is to make it harder for you to engage in a bad habit by creating some type of firewall between you and the bad habit.
    Links and Resources: 
    Michael Yardney
    Tom Corley - Rich Habits
    Get your own copy of our international bestseller Rich Habits Poor Habits 
    Join Michael Yardney and Tom Corley at Wealth Retreat 2020 – click here and register your interest
    Wondering what’s ahead for our property markets? Organize a time to speak with the team at Metropole by cl

    • 26 min
    Will the bubble burst or do we burst Harry’s Dent’s Bubble? | Interviews with Harry Dent and Pete Wargent

    Will the bubble burst or do we burst Harry’s Dent’s Bubble? | Interviews with Harry Dent and Pete Wargent

    We’re heading for the biggest crash since the great depression and it’s just around the corner, according to Harry Dent. He’s doing a virtual seminar telling anyone who’s prepared to listen that we’re headed for a stock market crash, a major depression, and the value of your home dropping 40-50%. Today we’re going to have a chat with Harry Dent, and I’m also going to have a talk with Pete Wargent.

    Before we get into the interview, a word of warning. Especially for the fainthearted. Harry makes some really scary predictions. Please listen to the whole interview, and don’t sell up your assets before you listen to my views and Pete Wargent’s. 
    Topics Discussed With Harry Dent
    Why Harry thinks that we’re approaching an economic winter with fallout worse than the Great Depression Why Harry believes we’re in a bubble Whether bubbles have to burst – can’t they just deflate? What the demographics are indicating will happen next to our economy The trigger that will burst the bubble Whether Harry believes there are safe ways to invest What business owners should be doing right now What Harry sees happening to the property market in Australia How immigration underpins Australia’s real estate market The upsides that Harry sees on the other side of the downturn What Harry would say to people who heard his previous predictions The message that Harry has for Australians in his virtual seminar Topics Discussed With Pete Wargent
    What a bubble really is and what happens when one bursts Whether the average Australian household has taken on too much debt The government’s current response to the crisis What the government has learned from previous downturns When the recovery will begin How Australia’s demographics compare to other countries The soundness of Australia’s banking system What could cause a collapse in the value of property in Australia Australia’s culture of homeownership Where there are likely to be the most difficulties in the property market Links and Resources: 
    Michael Yardney
    Get the team at Metropole to help build your personal Strategic Property Plan Click here and have a chat with us
    Harry Dent’s website
    Harry Dent’s Australian virtual seminar
    Pete Wargent  Next Level Wealth 
    Pete Wargent’s new book Low Rates High Returns
    Shownotes plus more here: Will the bubble burst or do we burst Harry’s Dent’s Bubble? | Interviews with Harry Dent and Pete Wargent
    Some of our favourite quotes from the show:
    “Well, we have some features of a bubble, yes, but we’re actually not in a bubble.” – Michael Yardney
    “Here we’ve got 70% of properties owned by homeowners, half of them without debt, and those of them that do have debt, it’s in the hands of those who can afford it.” – Michael Yardney
    “In the rest of the world, a lot of people expect to be tenants all their life; here in Australia people would rather eat dog food than give up their homes.” – Michael Yardney
    PLEASE LEAVE US A REVIEW
    Reviews are hugely important to me because they help new people discover this podcast. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave a review on iTunes - it's your way of passing the message forward to others and saying thank you to me. Here's how

    • 1 hr 13 min
    We’re all in the same Coronavirus storm, but not in the same boat. Who will be hit the hardest? With Simon Kuestenmacher

    We’re all in the same Coronavirus storm, but not in the same boat. Who will be hit the hardest? With Simon Kuestenmacher

    The coronavirus has clearly infected Australia. 
    And it doesn’t discriminate rich or poor, young or old. 
    I heard it said that we are all in the same boat. 
    But it's not like that.  We are in the same storm, but not in the same boat.  
    Your ship could be shipwrecked and mine might not be or vice versa. 
    For some, quarantine is optimal. A moment of reflection, of re-connection, taking life easy, or having a cocktail or coffee.  
    For others, this is a desperate financial & family crisis. 
    For some that live alone, they're facing endless loneliness. While for others it is peace, rest, and time with their mother, father, sons, and daughters. 
    Some are getting money from the government through JobKeeper and JobSeeker while others are working more hours for less money due to pay cuts or loss in sales. 
    Some want to go back to work because they don't qualify for unemployment and are running out of money. Others want to kill those who break the quarantine. 
    Some are home spending 2-3 hours a day helping their child with online schooling while others are spending 2-3 hours a day to educate their children on top of a 10 to 12-hour workday. 
    So, we are not in the same boat. We are going through a time when our perceptions and needs are completely different. 
    Each of us will emerge, in our own way, from this storm. It is very important to see beyond what is seen at first glance. Not just looking, actually seeing. 
    We are all on different ships during this storm experiencing a very different journey.
    And in today’s podcast, I want to chat about how the coronavirus crisis is going to affect different demographics and generations with leading demographer Simon Kustenmacher. As always you’ll find my chat with him educational, informative, and lots of fun, so welcome to today’s episode of the Michael Yardney podcast.
    Topics We Discuss in This Episode:
    We will see a slowdown of migration intake for at least two or three years Australia will have 0 net migration or negative net migration for 2020 Migration was the main driver for the housing market, so this will have a major impact on property The small towns will be hit first – bad news for regional Australia Temporary visitors like students or short-term workers will be affected as well. This, in turn, affects the short-term rental markets, like student accommodations and Airbnbs.  Regional Australia is somewhat reliant on temporary workers, so this is more bad news for them Different generations will be affected differently Baby boomers who are now about to retire will see their super balance shrink by 20% or more Some may have to put off retirement Holidays overseas are also probably canceled for some time to come Local tourism may be on the rise, which may be beneficial for Australia Baby boomers may find themselves supporting adult children who have lost jobs Gen Xers will probably suffer a lot from the coronavirus Xers are at a time in their life when they’re most likely to be overextended and spending every penny they earn Millennials are in a better position to ride out the next few years They’re reaching family formation stage of the life cycle More likely to have jobs where they can work from home and will want homes that allow for that. Millennials will need larger homes They may look for homes in the suburbs or in satellite cities Gen Z is concerned with global issues They’re in a position to ride out the pandemic and recession before kickstarting their career The pandemic may be the kickstart needed for working from home to happen on a large scale Links and Resources: 
    Michael Yardney
    In these challenging time why not get the team at Metropole to build you a personalised   Strategic Property Plan – this will help both beginning and experienced investors.
    Simon Kuestenmacher - Director of Research a

    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

Nickle Pickle Tickle ,

Universal Investing Concepts!!!

Thank you Michael for all the sound investing guidance and information! I live in Eugene, Oregon, USA and although much of your focus leans toward Aussie markets - your overall mindset advice and investing experience very easily and effectively extrapolates to my market in the US! I’ve enjoyed listening to you so much over the last year that I’ve been inspired to spend a month in Melbourne with my family for vacation in January! Hope all is well for you! Thank you for giving back to the property investor community! Cheers my friend! -Nick

Invest in knowledge ,

Thank you!

I was introduced to this podcast by my mother and find the information Michael shares incredibly valuable. Inspired by Michael I have decided to take a learning approach in preparation while saving for my first investment property and do this in a job that has me in the car a lot. I love being able to listen to the podcasts in otherwise ‘lost time’ during extensive driving time. Thank you Michael for your dedication in sharing your knowledge and experience in mindset and property
- Caiti Smith

Katie Joy B. ,

Property Made Pleasant

Michael and his wide variety of knowledgeable guests are making property investment pleasant! The great advice they provide, combined with the relatable way in which they deliver it had me hooked from the very first listen. Thanks for putting out such a stellar show Michael - keep up the great work!

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