2 episodes

Is there an ultimate reality? And if so, can it be accounted for by science?
The panelists address the questions posed, related to the natural existence of such a reality and, if it exists, whether it can be accounted for by science. Michael Shermer, founding publisher of Skeptic Magazine and participant in the Reason Rally in Washington, DC challenges Deepak Chopra, "What is reality?"

The Nature of Reality Chapman University

    • Science

Is there an ultimate reality? And if so, can it be accounted for by science?
The panelists address the questions posed, related to the natural existence of such a reality and, if it exists, whether it can be accounted for by science. Michael Shermer, founding publisher of Skeptic Magazine and participant in the Reason Rally in Washington, DC challenges Deepak Chopra, "What is reality?"

    • video
    The Nature of Reality

    The Nature of Reality

    "Is there an Ultimate Reality?" and if yes, "Can it be accounted for by science such as mathematics, biology and physics?" Hear Deepak Chopra, Michael Shermer and a panel of scientists address these questions during a recent special event in Chapman University's Folino Theater. Michael Shermer, founding publisher of Skeptic Magazine and participant in the Reason Rally in Washington, DC challenges Deepak Chopra, "What is reality?"

    • 1 hr 55 min
    • video
    The Believing Brain with Michael Shermer

    The Believing Brain with Michael Shermer

    Michael Shermer, Ph.D., publisher of Skeptic magazine and participant in the Reason Rally in Washington, DC, lectures about skepticism and conspiracy theory. He focuses this lecture around his class, "How to think like a scientist without being a geek." He examines current beliefs, dissecting them from a scientific point of view.
    Dr. Michael Shermer is an adjunct professor at Chapman University and Claremont Graduate University. He is the publisher of Skeptic magazine, a monthly columnist for Scientific American, and is the author of "Why People Believe Weird Things," "The Science of Good and Evil," "Why Darwin Matters," and "The Mind of the Market." His latest book is "The Believing Brain."

    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

Sick, very sick ,

Excellent, if somewhat futile discussion

Interesting discussion lacking any conclusion, because no conclusion is possible. Except for Shermer's rude condescending tone and blithe reductionist dogmatism, it was a very enjoyable event to watch. The fact is that scientific method operates in a specific form in which the effect of the observer is presumed to be extricated, and therefore it is ignored. Real science, despite all of its miraculous achievements, is limited in what it can know. Science cannot determine what anything "is", only what it "does". "Reality" is ISNESS. It is outside the boundaries of scientific method, which is involved in what things DO and how they interact in that doing. Being is an unfathomable mystery because the observer cannot be separated from it. When reductionists blithely philosophize about the nature of reality based on their presumptions they are engaging in scientism and promissory materialism and by so doing, they commit the same act they criticize in the more philosophical approach represented by Chopra, Stapp and Hammerhoff.

Professional Cyber Student ,

SCIENCE IS FOUND IN EVERY DISAGREEMENT

I loved this discussion because it shows the nature of the human animal. We always believe everything we hypothosize to be genius and everything opposing those beliefs to be insanity/stupidity. Until someone discovers a system of measurement for the oposition. Then, magically, we all rejoice in our genius. The real science is found in the question. We rejoice in the answer only for the sake of our collective ego.

TheStratCat ,

Baloney.

A book advert from a nicey-nice new age con man. Just a bunch of spiritual woo woo pulled out of Chopra's backside and dressed up with science-y sounding jargon. Please don't waste your time.

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