273 episodes

Podcast host and author David Andrew Wiebe is known for his calm and level-headed delivery of instructional podcast content for independent musicians and music business owners. After a six-month hiatus from his previous show, DAWCast: Music Entrepreneurship, and some thoughtful deliberation, he rebranded and relaunched. The New Music Industry Podcast isn’t just a simple and easily understood show name – it is also the title of his latest highly-praised book – The New Music Industry: Adapting, Growing, and Thriving in The Information Age – featuring personal development and business advice and a comprehensive view of modern marketing strategies – social media, blogging, podcasting, video, live performance, radio, and more. Listeners can expect to hear interviews with a wide range of people – not just musicians, experts and industry people, but also marketers, entrepreneurs and business owners that can bring a much-needed valuable perspective to the discussion. Wiebe has already had the likes of Bob Baker, James Moore, Ross Barber, Helen Austin, Eddie Meehan, Christopher Sutton, DeCarlos Garrison, Ian Temple, Melina Krumova, James Schramko, Brian Poillucci, Andrew Galucki, Deborah Fairchild, Jason Davis, Sean Murphy, Kevin Breuner, Jules Schroeder, Dobbs Franks, Johnny Vieira, Vik Rajan, Richard "Younglord" Frierson, Monica Strut, Brent Vaartstra, Matt Starr and many others.

The New Music Industry Podcast | MusicEntrepreneurHQ.com | with David Andrew Wiebe David Andrew Wiebe

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

Podcast host and author David Andrew Wiebe is known for his calm and level-headed delivery of instructional podcast content for independent musicians and music business owners. After a six-month hiatus from his previous show, DAWCast: Music Entrepreneurship, and some thoughtful deliberation, he rebranded and relaunched. The New Music Industry Podcast isn’t just a simple and easily understood show name – it is also the title of his latest highly-praised book – The New Music Industry: Adapting, Growing, and Thriving in The Information Age – featuring personal development and business advice and a comprehensive view of modern marketing strategies – social media, blogging, podcasting, video, live performance, radio, and more. Listeners can expect to hear interviews with a wide range of people – not just musicians, experts and industry people, but also marketers, entrepreneurs and business owners that can bring a much-needed valuable perspective to the discussion. Wiebe has already had the likes of Bob Baker, James Moore, Ross Barber, Helen Austin, Eddie Meehan, Christopher Sutton, DeCarlos Garrison, Ian Temple, Melina Krumova, James Schramko, Brian Poillucci, Andrew Galucki, Deborah Fairchild, Jason Davis, Sean Murphy, Kevin Breuner, Jules Schroeder, Dobbs Franks, Johnny Vieira, Vik Rajan, Richard "Younglord" Frierson, Monica Strut, Brent Vaartstra, Matt Starr and many others.

    272 – Spiderweb Marketing Essentials for Musicians

    272 – Spiderweb Marketing Essentials for Musicians

    What is the most effective but underrated online strategy for creating results in your music career? How can you use it to grow your fan base, get your gig on, and earn an income from your passion?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Download the PDF Transcription

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:30 – An update on Spiderweb Marketing

    * 01:07 – Creating a singular strategic focus

    * 02:27 – Email vs. SMS / text messaging vs. personal connections

    * 04:04 – Content syndication and distribution may not be the best use of your time

    * 05:51 – Every social network has a pathway

    * 07:10 – Episode summary

    * 09:02 – Closing thoughts



    Resources Mentioned in This Episode:



    * 182 – Spiderweb Marketing for Musicians [Mini Course]

    * PDF Vault



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    And in this episode of the podcast, I’m going to share an update on spiderweb marketing, a topic I originally covered way back in episode 182 of the podcast and offered up as a free mini course.

    It’s kind of funny to me that I can even say “way back” because it doesn’t feel all that long ago. But true enough, it has been over two years since we published that episode.

    The strategy is still relevant and viable today. But we have learned a few things in the last couple of years.

    So, let’s talking about fine-tuning the strategy to get the best results possible.

    1. Set Goals & Create a Singular Focus for Your Spiderweb Marketing Strategy



    At the center of the spiderweb is the beastly creature himself, the spider.

    So far as this marketing strategy is concerned, the spider represents your website. The web represents the various channels you acquire traffic from. Getting people to your website is the entire goal of the strategy.

    But more than ever, we need to be clear on what we want to get people to do once they’ve landed on our website.

    Do you want them to sign up for your email list? Listen to your music? Watch a video? Buy your merch?

    It’s going to be tough to get people to buy your merch or sign up for your fan club upon first contact. So, I recommend getting them to take one of the other actions just mentioned, something low pressure.

    Since getting email signups is key to the strategy, you could potentially combine these goals. For instance, you could have the visitor enter their email address to receive a video, and upon signing up, take them to another page on your site to view that video. Boom! Now you’ve gotten more video views and have earned the right to contact the visitor about future offers.

    At Music Entrepreneur HQ, our singular focus is to get newcomers to sign up for the PDF Vault. This is reflected on our homepage, and soon, it will be reflected across the entire site.

    2. Getting Your Content Seen / Your Spider Web Content Marketing Strategy

    ShortStack says only 10% of your followers see your new post on Instagram.

    Across the entire spectrum of social networks, that number is much closer to 3 to 6%.

    Meanwhile, email campaigns are generally seen by an average of 28 to 33% of your entire list.

    There’s a reason we suggest prioritizing email list growth.

    • 10 min
    271 – 5 eCommerce Solutions for Musicians

    271 – 5 eCommerce Solutions for Musicians

    So, the ability to get your music out to dozens of destinations using music distribution services is awesome. But what if you want to sell your music and merch through other platforms and earn a greater income? What eCommerce solutions can musicians take advantage of?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Download the PDF Transcription

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:36 – The two pathways to earning an income from your music online

    * 01:36 – Bandcamp

    * 03:08 – Shopify / Single

    * 04:22 – Gumroad

    * 05:38 – Sellfy

    * 06:46 – Koji

    * 07:44 – Episode summary



    Resources Mentioned in This Episode:



    * Bandcamp

    * 155 – How to Use Shopify to Sell Your Music

    * Single

    * Gumroad

    * 10XPro

    * Sellfy

    * Koji



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    Now, I’ve shared before about the two pathways you can take to create an income from music online. And of direct response marketing and eCommerce, eCommerce is the easier one to get started with.

    And the great news is, whether it’s direct response marketing or eCommerce, you can set the price of your music. You’re not obligated to sell your albums for $9.99 and your singles for 99 cents. You can be much more intentional and strategic about pricing.

    Plus, it allows you to do things like put your latest single up on Spotify, and then tell your fans, “if you’re interested in the whole album, check out my website at AtomikPenguins .com” or wherever you send people to buy your music.

    Now, the big question is whether you can even make money selling music as a musician, right? Just because you can set up an online store doesn’t automatically mean people will buy. But after listening to this podcast episode, I don’t think there’s going to be a shadow of doubt in your mind.

    So, keep listening to the end, and let’s get to the first of five eCommerce solutions we’ll be talking about today:

    1. Bandcamp



    Bandcamp is one of the most popular eCommerce solutions for musicians, focused exclusively on music. On their homepage, they advertise the fact that fans have paid artists $199 million in the last year. So, forget the idea that you can’t get paid for your music – there are plenty of artists doing it already.

    Unlike most other solutions available, Bandcamp is a marketplace. And that means they actively promote artists through discover, tag hubs, artist recommendations, fan collections, and music feed. You shouldn’t expect to receive a ton of promotion this way unless you’re already growing a following and selling your music on Bandcamp, but it’s still nice to know they care.

    Bandcamp gives you control over the design and colors of your page, and it lets you add key information like a short bio, lyrics, and liner notes too.

    In addition to digital music, you can also sell vinyl, cassettes, T-shirts, and other merch. Bandcamp even says in the last five years, vinyl sales have gone up by 613%, cassettes by 349%, and T-shirts by 492%, and they’ve already sold $341 million worth of merch.

    • 10 min
    270 – How We’ve Collected Over 5,000 Emails

    270 – How We’ve Collected Over 5,000 Emails

    Are you looking to grow your email list and attract your 1,000 true fans? What if you could grow your email list well beyond 1,000 subscribers?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Download the PDF Transcription

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:26 – 1,000 true fans

    * 01:18 – Laying the groundwork to grow your email list

    * 02:24 – Creating an irresistible lead magnet

    * 02:59 – The best type of lead magnet: Content upgrade

    * 04:13 – Which pages do you create content upgrades for?

    * 06:02 – You’ll need to adjust and optimize your strategy

    * 07:37 – Episode summary

    * 09:05 – Setting up your OTR website



    Resources Mentioned in This Episode:



    * 086 – How to Work Less & Make More as a Music Entrepreneur

    * 10XPro

    * ConvertKit

    * Music Money Machine

    * PDF Vault



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    Now, the title of this episode is How We Collected Over 5,000 Emails, but in the grand scheme of things, 5,000 emails is nothing.

    There are plenty of bloggers and businesses out there that have collected over 10,000, 100,000, even one million plus subscribers over the years.

    But we’ve all heard about 1,000 true fans, the idea that you could have a perfectly sustainable, even thriving artistic career if you had a minimum of 1,000 people who bought everything you made.

    And a small, engaged audience, is better than a huge database of subscribers who don’t open your emails.

    Anyway, getting to the point of finding your 1,000 true fans is likely going to take collecting more than 1,000 emails, but if you could get 5,000 people on your email list, do you think you’d have a pretty good chance at living out the independent music career of your dreams?

    Keep listening to find out how we did it…

    Setting the Foundation

    If you don’t lay the groundwork, you can’t collect emails. That’s the bottom line.

    There are many methodologies out there, and you can experiment with all of them to see what works best for you.

    But for Music Entrepreneur HQ and practically any other site we’ve established, there’s only been one reliable way of growing our email list. We haven’t gotten results with putting up a signup form on our website and waiting for people to sign up. I guess that works for some people…

    We follow a methodology created by James Schramko of SuperFastBusiness called Own the Racecourse or OTR. By the way, I had an excellent conversation with him in episode 86 of the podcast.

    People often think the key to OTR is publishing great content, when really the most critical aspect of it is setting up a platform you own. It’s one of the reasons we believe so strongly in that. In the long run, though, you do want to establish a platform that’s full of content your audience will love. But you can and should start collecting emails from day one.

    Once you’ve bought your domain, paid for hosting, and have established your website, that’s the time to start collecting emails. That’s your foundation.

    Create Lead Magnet(s)

    The next step is to create your lead magnet.

    • 10 min
    269 – 5 Steps to Web3 Success for Independent Musicians

    269 – 5 Steps to Web3 Success for Independent Musicians

    Is it time to embrace Web3 as a musician? What steps should you take if you’re interested in making a go of it as an independent artist?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Download the PDF Transcription

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:27 – Web3 is here

    * 01:06 – Learning about blockchain-powered, decentralized platforms

    * 02:13 – Discover the platforms and experiment with them

    * 03:41 – Dig your rolodex well before you’re thirsty

    * 04:34 – Create your first NFT (if you haven’t already)

    * 05:46 – Understanding how to handle cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, Ethereum, etc.

    * 07:01 – Episode summary

    * 08:10 – Closing thoughts



    Resources Mentioned in This Episode:



    * 016 – 5 Things I Learned From Blockchain Revolution

    * 180 – The IMDb of the Music Industry

    * 192 – Looking to the Future of a Blockchain-Powered Music Industry

    * 237 – Music Streaming, Copyright & NFTs

    * 248 – Get Your Music Distributed & Tap into More Revenue Streams

    * 260 – The Future of Music & Multimedia

    * Odysee

    * BitClout

    * Koji

    * PDF Vault



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    Like it or not, Web3 is here. Now, nobody knows for sure how things are going to shake out with the current hype. The parallels to the dot-com bubble are practically beyond reproach, so separating hype from reality is a serious challenge.

    But investor Eric Siu makes a good point – it’s called Web3 for a reason. It’s happening, and it’s here to stay. It’s the next evolution of the web.

    And so, we need to begin dipping our toes into the waters before jumping headlong into the unknown. But the time to get started is now. The longer you wait, the greater the chance you will miss out on incredible opportunities.

    Today, we’re going to be looking at five steps to Web3 success for independent musicians.

    Step #1 – Begin Learning

    What is Web3? How does it work? Why does it matter?

    Whether on The New Music Industry Podcast or Music Entrepreneur HQ blog, we’re no stranger to blockchain related topics:



    * You can go all the way back to episode 16 of the podcast to listen to my review on Blockchain Revolution and pick up the book if it interests you

    * In episode 180 of the podcast, I talked to Vasja Veber of Viberate

    * You can have a listen to episode 192 of the podcast with a href="https://musicentrepreneurhq.com/192-looking-to-the-future-of-blockchain-powered-music-in...

    • 9 min
    268 – Uncover Your Core Message – with Tara Divina

    268 – Uncover Your Core Message – with Tara Divina

    Do you know what your brand message is? Do you know what difference you’re out to make in the world with your music?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Download the PDF Transcription

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:25 – Tara Divina’s awakening

    * 02:48 – Why Tara found the career path stifling

    * 03:30 – What does “meaning” mean to Tara?

    * 05:08 – Rediscovering your identity as an artist

    * 08:17 – How to scale a successful business

    * 11:03 – What is core message marketing?

    * 14:40 – Exercise to discover your core message

    * 17:44 – Examples of core brand messages

    * 19:44 – Turning your life and business into a work of art

    * 21:03 – Branding sounds like a lot of work…

    * 23:00 – Tapping into creative inspiration

    * 28:30 – Why is beauty so important?

    * 30:45 – How do artists monetize their work effectively?

    * 34:36 – What’s the last YouTube video Tara watched?

    * 35:03 – What is Tara’s daily routine like?

    * 35:44 – What is the greatest challenge Tara has overcome?

    * 36:00 – What is the greatest victory Tara has experienced?

    * 36:41 – Tara’s recommended books

    * 39:01 – Tara’s final thoughts



    Resources Mentioned in This Episode:



    * Tara Divina

    * Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert

    * Attached by Amir Levine and Rachel S. F. Heller

    * Healing Back Pain by Dr. John E. Sarno

    * 257 – Living Pain-Free in Music & Life

    * Knockout Originals

    * PDF Vault



    Transcription:

    David Andrew Wiebe: Today I’m passing the mic with Tara Divina. How are you today, Tara?

    Tara Divina: I’m doing great.

    David Andrew Wiebe: I understand that you became an intern at London-Sire Records in New York City at 20 years old. Then you joined the executive team at Warner Music Group overseeing the independent music arm, specifically in digital sales and marketing. But then you realized you’re made for something else. What happened?

    Tara Divina: Well, what happened was that I had sort of a rocket ship to the moon type career in the music industry. And I had originally gotten into the business because at the end of my university degree in business, I thought to myself, “What am I going to do next?” And the answer, unlike most of my peers, was not become a product manager at Pepsi Cola, or an accountant at KPMG. That for the going, typical career flow was and so I thought to myself, well, I love music. I love being a musician, perhaps entering the industry will bring me closer to these things. And over time, what I discovered was that being in the industry, took me much further from these things, and from my creative impulses. And so, being a very creative spirit, I began to get progressively more and more depressed and disillusioned, even though on paper, I had everything that anyone would ever want, you know, wonderful, prestigious career, lots of abundance financially, lots of engagement with things. It just didn’t add up for me. And I hit a breaking point where I was starting to decline and then went to Burning Man,

    • 40 min
    267 – 10 Ways to Fail as an Independent Artist

    267 – 10 Ways to Fail as an Independent Artist

    Do you wish you could be a spectacular failure in the music business? Are you looking for the step-by-step process that will make you an embarrassing disgrace to yourself, your family, and the world?

    That’s what we’re going to be looking at in this episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    Download the PDF Transcription

    Podcast Highlights:



    * 00:32 – A framework for failure

    * 00:52 – Be a jerk to everyone

    * 01:17 – Flake out on everything

    * 01:58 – Don’t improve as a musician

    * 02:29 – Spend all your time on social media

    * 03:18 – Don’t build email lists

    * 03:55 – Make Spotify your sole source of income

    * 04:34 – Don’t get expert coaching

    * 05:16 – Don’t invest in your personal growth

    * 05:56 – Don’t reinvest in your music career

    * 06:29 – Remain a Blockbuster in the age of Netflix

    * 07:00 – Episode summary



    Resources Mentioned in This Episode:



    * 266 – The 5 Layers of Independent Music Success

    * Leadpages

    * The New Music Industry by David Andrew Wiebe



    Transcription:

    Hey, it’s David Andrew Wiebe.

    So, normally I talk about frameworks for success, just like in the last episode of The New Music Industry Podcast.

    This episode is going to be a little different. What follows is a framework for failure.

    Now, this might seem a little strange, but by the end of it, I think you will begin to see how powerful an exercise it can be.

    You’ll see what I mean. Let’s get into this.

    1. Be a Complete Jerk

    Insult the people you meet. Make fun of your fans. Criticize and attack your bandmates. Curse the media. People are awful and they deserve to know just how much they suck and how much better you are.

    Hit on men or women who are already attached to someone else. Stay at hotel rooms, throw the TV out the window, and refuse to pay for your stay. Flip off everyone. They’re horrible people for not recognizing your greatness.

    2. Be a Flake

    Don’t show up to band meetings or rehearsals. Don’t show up to gigs. Don’t show up to radio or podcast interviews. And if you do show up, make it an hour late, and pretend like you weren’t at fault. Make no excuses, no apologies, and put no effort into salvaging the opportunity or resolving the situation whatsoever.

    Be a person who promises big and delivers small. Or deliver nothing at all. Disappoint your friends, your family, your fans, and anyone else who dares express any interest in you.

    Make bad excuses. Say, “I’m washing my hair that night,” or “I’m tired,” or “I have to get up early tomorrow,” or “my dog ate my homework,” in contexts where it doesn’t make sense, and pretend like people buy your reasons for being absent.

    3. Don’t Improve

    Spend no time whatsoever working on your craft. Don’t try to be better.

    Next time you have a show, or a new release, make no effort. Don’t practice. Don’t market. Don’t show up with new material unless it’s just as bad as your earlier works. Don’t engage the fans. Don’t engage the venue owner, event organizer, or anyone else connected to your show or project. Actively insult them instead.

    Give a half-assed attempt at everything, just to make sure your performances aren’t getting better. You don’t want to improve by mistake and give the wrong impression.

    4. Rely Exclusively on Social Media

    Spend all your time and energy on social media. Create accounts far and wide – Bandcamp, Facebook, Fanbase, Instagram,

    • 9 min

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I raise my goblet of rock to you, good sir!

The music industry has changed dramatically and this podcast will help you evolve with the times so that you can pursue your dream of being a musician!

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