662 episodes

Unrivalled analysis of the latest in UK politics, with Anoosh Chakelian, Andrew Marr and the New Statesman politics team.
New episodes Tuesday and Friday.
Send us a question on anything related to UK politics, in Westminster and beyond, by emailing podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The New Statesman Podcast The New Statesman

    • News
    • 4.8 • 55 Ratings

Unrivalled analysis of the latest in UK politics, with Anoosh Chakelian, Andrew Marr and the New Statesman politics team.
New episodes Tuesday and Friday.
Send us a question on anything related to UK politics, in Westminster and beyond, by emailing podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Inside Liz Truss and Kwasi Kwarteng’s economic meltdown, with David Gauke and Duncan Weldon

    Inside Liz Truss and Kwasi Kwarteng’s economic meltdown, with David Gauke and Duncan Weldon

    With the cost of debt rising and the pound still falling, just how much damage has the Conservatives’ mini-Budget done to the economy?
    To unpick what’s going on, Anoosh Chakelian is joined by David Gauke, who was work and pensions secretary and chief secretary to the Treasury under Theresa May, and by the economist and author Duncan Weldon, along with the New Statesman’s business editor, Will Dunn.
    They discuss why the markets reacted so badly to the Chancellor’s statement on 23 September, what the subsequent Bank of England intervention actually did, and what the impact of all of this might be on ordinary voters as well as the electoral prospects of the Tory party.
    Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.

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    • 31 min
    Is Keir Starmer’s vision enough? With Ed Miliband

    Is Keir Starmer’s vision enough? With Ed Miliband

    Anoosh Chakelian and Freddie Hayward are joined by Ed Miliband, the shadow climate change and net zero secretary and former Labour leader, to discuss Keir Starmer’s speech from the Labour Party conference in Liverpool.
    They discuss the pledge to create a publicly owned “Great British energy” company to cut bills and the conference slogan “A fairer, greener future”; how the economic turmoil will affect their ability to deliver these promises; and whether Miliband would advise a note of caution to the optimistic party faithful. 
    Then the New Statesman polling expert, Ben Walker, joins the podcast to discuss a recent YouGov poll that shows Labour leading the Tories by 17 points and whether the plunging pound has damaged public confidence in Liz Truss’s government.


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    • 19 min
    Is Labour finally a government in waiting?

    Is Labour finally a government in waiting?

    Anoosh Chakelian, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Wearmouth report from the Labour Party conference in Liverpool.
    They discuss the remarkably upbeat mood among the party faithful, the headline policy announcements so far, and the alternative vision for the economy set out by the shadow chancellor, Rachel Reeves, as the pound continues to plummet after Liz Truss’s tax-cutting frenzy.
    Then in You Ask Us, they answer a listener’s question on the prospects of the party abandoning the first-past-the-post electoral system, after polls show a majority of the British public are in favour of change.
    If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk
    Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.

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    • 18 min
    The Tories’ plan to make the rich richer

    The Tories’ plan to make the rich richer

    Kwasi Kwarteng, the Chancellor, presented a mini-Budget today (23 September) whose centrepiece was the biggest tax cuts in decades in an attempt to stimulate the economy. Anoosh Chakelian, Rachel Wearmouth, Rachel Cunliffe and Emma Haslett take us through the announcements that shocked the House of Commons. 
    They discuss how these ideological policies will disproportionately benefit the rich; the UK’s precarious financial position as borrowing costs jump; and whether this is a departure from the last twelve years of Tory rule, as was suggested by Rachel Reeves, the shadow chancellor.
    In You Ask Us, the team answer Rachel Cunliffe’s question: does this now mean that a post-2009 graduate on £50,000 a year will pay a higher marginal tax rate (including student loan repayments) than someone on £200,000 who went to university for free before tuition fees were introduced?
    If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk
    Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.

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    • 29 min
    Inside Britain’s housing crisis

    Inside Britain’s housing crisis

    The UK has a housing crisis: in the past decade, decent and stable living arrangements have become an impossible dream for many.
    The New Statesman’s senior associate editor Rachel Cunliffe speaks to Hashi Mohamed, author of A Home of One’s Own, which draws on his own history of housing insecurity and his professional career as a planning barrister, about how we came to this point and what can be done.
    They discuss the segregating and alienating effects of housing insecurity, why successive governments have failed to act on this crisis, and how they can be persuaded that it’s a priority.
    Podcast listeners can get a subscription to the New Statesman for just £1 per week, for 12 weeks. Visit www.newstatesman.com/podcastoffer

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    • 30 min
    Trussonomics: Is Trickling Down the new Levelling Up?

    Trussonomics: Is Trickling Down the new Levelling Up?

    The newly appointed Chancellor of the Exchequer, Kwasi Kwarteng, is facing criticism after he sacked Tom Scholar, permanent secretary at the Treasury since 2016, and following reports that he plans to scrap caps on banker bonuses. 
     
    Anoosh Chakelian is joined by Harry Lambert, Freddie Hayward and Rachel Wearmouth to discuss what’s really behind the sacking of the Treasury's most senior civil servant, and Prime Minister Liz Truss’s plans to encourage economic growth through tax cuts during a cost-of-living crisis.
     
    Then, in You Ask Us, Rachel Cunliffe joins the team to answer a listener question on whether the police crackdown on anti-monarchy protestors is the result of the Police, Crime, Courts and Sentencing Act.
    If you have a question for You Ask Us, email podcasts@newstatesman.co.uk
    Podcast listeners can subscribe to the New Statesman for just £1 a week for 12 weeks using our special offer. Just visit newstatesman.com/podcastoffer.

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    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
55 Ratings

55 Ratings

Johnny in the Mass Hills ,

Disappointing episode

Regular host is on vacation and substitute is not a skilled moderator. Discussion was superficial and interactions between the speakers was at times very awkward.

blablayaddayadda ,

Love it.

Very chill, very informed, learn something every time about topics I’m interested in and positions I align with.

AldoBermondsey ,

Amazing podcast

Solid analysis, loved Marr’s analysis of the current crisis.

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