1,183 episodes

Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

The NPR Politics Podcast NPR

    • News
    • 4.5 • 23K Ratings

Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

    Why Women Seek Abortions After 15 Weeks

    Why Women Seek Abortions After 15 Weeks

    The Supreme Court could allow Mississippi's ban on abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy to take effect. In the United States, many women end up getting abortions after that point because of clinic backlogs and cost issues.

    This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, national correspondent Sarah McCammon, and legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg.

    Connect:
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    • 14 min
    The High Cost Of Vaccine Conspiracies

    The High Cost Of Vaccine Conspiracies

    An NPR analysis finds that people living in counties which strongly supported Donald Trump in the 2020 election could be three times more likely to die of coronavirus than those in counties which strongly supported Joe Biden. That difference appears to be driven by partisan differences in vaccination rates, as vaccine conspiracies spread among far-right voters.

    This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, senior Science editor and correspondent Geoffrey Brumfiel, and White House correspondent Scott Detrow.

    Connect:
    Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.
    Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org
    Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
    Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.
    Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
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    • 15 min
    Weekly Roundup: December 3rd

    Weekly Roundup: December 3rd

    Congress passed a short-term funding bill to avoid a government shutdown, but they only punted and they still have a long list of things to do before the end of the year. Plus, there's a lot of talk about Vice President Harris and Transportation Secretary Buttigieg. Will they or won't they run for president in 2024?

    This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.

    Connect:
    Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.
    Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org
    Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
    Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.
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    Find and support your local public radio station.

    • 24 min
    Why Two Experts Think The Supreme Court Is Prepared To Roll Back Roe V. Wade

    Why Two Experts Think The Supreme Court Is Prepared To Roll Back Roe V. Wade

    The Supreme Court heard arguments for a case that challenges the foundation of Roe v. Wade, the decision that originally made abortion legal. In their questioning, the conservative justices seemed primed to overturn the fifty year old precedent. That decision would radically change abortion access in the United States.

    This episode: political correspondent Juana Summers, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and Mary Ziegler, author of Abortion And The Law In America.

    Connect:
    Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.
    Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org
    Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
    Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.
    Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
    Find and support your local public radio station.

    • 13 min
    The Big Consequences Of Small Changes To Congressional Maps

    The Big Consequences Of Small Changes To Congressional Maps

    Congressional districts are redrawn every ten years by state legislatures. In theory it is so populations are accurately represented when voting, but partisan gerrymandering means when you look at the map you'll probably see some really wonky shapes. We look at two states, Texas and Georgia, where redistricting will have major consequences for politicians and policy.

    This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, Georgia Public Broadcasting's Stephen Fowler, and KERA's Bret Jasper.

    Connect:
    Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.
    Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org
    Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
    Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.
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    Find and support your local public radio station.

    • 14 min
    Congress Has A LOT To Do, But Can They Stop Fighting For Long Enough To Do It?

    Congress Has A LOT To Do, But Can They Stop Fighting For Long Enough To Do It?

    Congress and, in particular, congressional Democrats have a long to-do list before the end of the year. But inter- and intra-party disputes threaten any kind of action. So what are the disagreements, and when push comes to shove can they get the job done?

    This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Deirdre Walsh, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.

    Connect:
    Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.
    Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org
    Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
    Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.
    Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
    Find and support your local public radio station.

    • 14 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
23K Ratings

23K Ratings

troxel2021 ,

Listening to hear what you are saying

I don’t won’t this to be taken the wrong way: I think Ayesha is a fine reporter but she needs to get rid of that thick accent. As an African-American originally from South Carolina, I matriculated at a private New England graduate school years ago. Back then, I was determined to keep my accent. At one point, a dear friend pulled me aside and told me that she couldn’t get past my accent to hear what I was actually saying. It wasn’t rude or mean or unkind or unjust or racist. It was necessary. In their zeal to be the most “woke” among us, Ayesha, I know your NPR colleagues will never be honest with you about this. But the reality is, when we elect to interact and participate in a professional milieu some adjustments must be made without sacrificing who you are, or your identify or the love of where you are from. It’s just something you have to do. To wit: get rid of the accent.

Sportsaholic07 ,

A daily listen for me

I appreciate this pod for keeping me updated on the many political issues going on every day AND for putting these things into a broader historical and contemporary context. Their deep knowledge and experience allow me to understand the daily workings of politics in our country far more than I could have without that scaffolding.

I was so disappointed to read the reviews specifically negative about Ayesha Rascoe. I will admit - when Rascoe first appeared on the pod, I had to confront some of my own racism that I had been blind to despite working actively for years against it. Rascoe reports with intelligence, insight, AND incisive humor (which is also employed by many of the other hosts of the pod). If you struggle to hear what she is actually saying past her manner of speaking or humor, but this doesn’t happen with the other hosts, I’d encourage you to step back enough to engage with what in yourself may be causing that. Thank you, NPR politics, but specifically Ayesha Rascoe, for being consistently clear, delightfully funny, and representative of many of the ways to be an American engaged with our political system. You have become voices I look forward to hearing from daily.

had fox taken over npr? ,

frustrated listener

There are so many important, substantive issues that listeners hope to hear in-depth reporting and analysis of… but you guys frequently waste time on on the what is best characterized as the gossip of the day - Will PeteButtigieg run in 2024?! What is the dynamic of the Harris-Buttigieg relationship?! Is there tension between Biden and Harris?! How low is Biden in the polls? Please do the American people and democracy a favor and do your job by reporting on real issues! You pose the question “why hasn’t the political credit been given” to the Biden administration for passing a huge infrastructure plan. Perhaps it’s because you and other media outlets fail focus your coverage on substance. Instead you resort to dismissive phrases like “big wonky projects” as if no one would possibly be capable or interested in the learning the details. Too often you’re interpretation of “politics” is little more than palace intrigue.

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