270 episodes

Welcome to The One Big Tip Podcast, where I interview digital marketers, business owners, executives and entrepreneurs to discuss business strategy and the tools that make it happen. After 10+ years in the digital marketing trenches, I have seen SEO pandas and penguins come and go and have watched fads explode and fizzle out. With this podcast, I present to you the most interesting people that I can find, and ask them to give you their one big tip to be more successful in your business. Learn more at: https://jeffmendelson.com/onebigtip

The One Big Tip Podcast with Jeff Mendelson Everyone has that One Big Tip!

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 32 Ratings

Welcome to The One Big Tip Podcast, where I interview digital marketers, business owners, executives and entrepreneurs to discuss business strategy and the tools that make it happen. After 10+ years in the digital marketing trenches, I have seen SEO pandas and penguins come and go and have watched fads explode and fizzle out. With this podcast, I present to you the most interesting people that I can find, and ask them to give you their one big tip to be more successful in your business. Learn more at: https://jeffmendelson.com/onebigtip

    E305 - Reveal the insights of your advertising with strategic creativity to build great branding and create superior designs | with Robin Landa

    E305 - Reveal the insights of your advertising with strategic creativity to build great branding and create superior designs | with Robin Landa

    Robin Landa is a distinguished professor at Michael Graves College at Kane University, as well as an award-winning author who has written 25 books. She did her training as a Designer and fine artist and was swayed into writing. Robin’s books are an extension of her work in the classroom to educate people and have taught 1000s of people to tap into their creative potential.
    One quick way for people to tap into their creative potential is to be curious and observant, and it’s critical to maintain your creativity and mental health. There have been articles about the fact that being observant, wards off civility, and asking specific questions, posing questions about possibilities outside your own experience, not about regrets, but about possibilities. Listen to what other people say. That's how inventions are created. 
    Strategic creativity is the power to conceive something that solves a problem and benefits people, aiming empathetically at an appropriate target audience, which is the key. When people think about creativity, they often think about poets or painters being creative and doing their own thing for themselves. In advertising, branding, and design, we aim at mass audiences. Being strategic in the creative process, and being relevant in order to connect with people and resonate in the long term. Being thoughtful and fitting into people's lives to have context, appropriate perspective, and humanistic, being people-centered. Make those observations, always look for that human truth, and have the insight on to base an idea. Solutions have to be interesting, something that people will want to spend time on. 
    Looking at the social film for Intel by PJ Pereira, the president and chief global Creative Officer of Pereira O'Dell, called The Beauty Inside. Auditioning people on Facebook to be in the film, all fans – male or female – were called to audition for the lead role of Alex because his appearance changes every day. Every time this person wakes up, he's in a different body, it's the same person on the inside, just like Intel is on the inside, but the person looked different on the outside. People also played Alex throughout the experience on his Facebook timeline, via photos and videos, adding to his narrative at every step. When this person fell in love, he had to deal with the fact that his physical being kept changing. It was a real breakthrough idea in advertising, a branded content piece for Intel.
    You don't want your work to sound like advertising. Nobody wants to be sold. Nobody wants a sales pitch and therefore you have to get under people's radar. The greatest risk is to do something pedestrian, to do whatever the other guys are doing because no one's going to take notice. It hurts when advertising sounds like hucksters or snake oil salesmen. A lot of brands right now are trying to do good for society. Contribute the foundations they have, to sustainability. To align their values with Gen Z as Gen Z really wants to know what you're doing for the world, doing more than just making a profit. 
    In this episode:
    [02:23]  Ways to help people tap into their creative potential  and communicate it to the world
    Asking specific questions and being very curiousBeing observant is critical to not only maintaining your creativity but your mental health
    [04:49]  How strategic creativity is so important for advertising agencies and graphic designers
    The power to conceive something that solves a problemConnect with people in order to be relevant and resonate long termLooking for that human truth, that insight on what you can base ideas on
    [08:45]  Discussing examples of great advertising
    Mcdonald's and Burger KingThe Fearless Girl on Wall streetThe social film for Intel by PJ Pereira called The Beauty...

    • 18 min
    E304 - Avoid making six to eight-figure mistakes by solving unpleasant problems with exciting solutions | with Tim Calise

    E304 - Avoid making six to eight-figure mistakes by solving unpleasant problems with exciting solutions | with Tim Calise

    Tim has spent the past 15 years as a Founder, Operator, and Growth Partner Investor of hyper-growth companies ranging from investment management, product and services, tech-enabled services, and software development. As a strategy and execution partner to multiple 8-figure CEOs, and advisor to over 15 privately held businesses with annual revenues from 250,000 to 10 million plus, Tim has made a name for himself in being risk aware and adept at successfully navigating companies and teams through challenging business issues centered around a core value proposition. His well-earned playbook is now a valuable resource to company Owners and Founders.
    Tim helps companies avoid making six to eight-figure mistakes, solving unpleasant problems with exciting solutions. He focuses on helping companies on the lower end, either those who are just getting started, or who have stalled or feel like something's missing, to grow in their own journey. He explains that mistakes come in two forms. They are the ones that we make knowingly and the ones that we make, unknowingly. He believes these things are kind of acting as brakes to progress and provide clarity, especially in a team. If all of them aren't moving in the same direction, it's going to be really hard to grow. Pull back and retreat to a position of strength, and then build with clarity and continuity.
    A number of business owners and entrepreneurs start with a kind of belief, to be the singular product that they want to bring to market. In reality, every time we bring something to market, we're actually solving a problem for the buyer. Most of the companies that Tim works with are in the services industry, where he will take a business that is somewhat of a commodity in the market, and get very specific about who they are targeting, talking to, and their value proposition. Looking at other consumables that people may need over time, other opportunities to deliver upon as a full suite of services.
    It’s a misconception if you are providing a service that you have to be the one to actually produce each piece of the product. You can be exceptional in one piece, and then go find partners that will look for joint ventures or partnerships in other areas. The sum of the parts is solving a problem in its totality. It provides operational breathing room, clarity, and focus. 
    There are five core functions of a business, lead generation, lead nurturing, conversion, sales process fulfillment, and then upsell and retention, and they have helped people in all five of those. His company grew quickly from about $400,000 in revenue in 2017 to over 50 million in revenue in just a few short years. That growth came from a mutually beneficial dynamic that was created. The six weeks challenge was priced on average, somewhere in the neighborhood of $600, and the importance of that was because, for the gym owner, it allowed for more efficient lead generation, it improved the short-term cash flow of the business, and therefore allowed the gym owner to reinvest in that relationship to provide a better level of service for the members. 
    Although the price was higher than typical, what it did was, for the first time in the mass market, it hit the three key areas that someone needed to go through a transformation. It was very much success based rather than action based. There was a movement component, there was a nutrition component, and there was an accountability component. That $600 ticket was high, but it was high because it worked and the quality of the experience was very good. The level of success was astronomical, aligning all the pieces.
    Focus on opportunities to deliver upon a full-service suite and solve a specific problem, this framework is your message and your margin, and there are four key components to it. Number one is your positioning. Number two is your product. Number three is the packaging. And number four is your pricing. How you define these...

    • 24 min
    E303 - Gain pricing power through pricing strategy methods | with Per Sjöfors

    E303 - Gain pricing power through pricing strategy methods | with Per Sjöfors

    Per Sjöfors is the founder and CEO of Sjöfors & Partners, a thought leader in everything pricing, driving growth, sales volume, and profits. His team of pricing consultants has profound knowledge of pricing strategies validated by powerful AI software to produce the pricing strategy services you most definitely need. They work with globally recognized brands on ways to gain pricing power through comprehensive analysis and pricing strategy methods. Forming marketing and sales strategies with tactics to transform companies to their next best level.  
    Per is a sought-after speaker for various conferences, part of the Forbes Business Council and The C-Suite, appears regularly on podcasts and radio shows, and gets routinely quoted in the financial and business press. His new book "The Price Whisperer - A Holistic Approach to Pricing Power" is an Amazon best seller.  
    When Per started experimenting with pricing, some of those experiments were very successful, pushing revenues up 25%, but they didn’t understand why these experiments worked. 15 years ago, he set up his own shop and decided to develop a process that would make every pricing experiment a success. Creating a holistic view of how to price correctly, driving higher revenue, sales volume, and higher profits.
    Pricing is an art, combining process and science. Most people try to simplify the pricing model, thinking about the cost of the goods. But you actually need to price above your cost. The problem is that the costs have nothing to do with the value that you deliver, whether that is a service or a product. The willingness to pay means that you can measure how much people are willing to pay for the value you deliver. When you price accordingly. Your sales volume will increase, your revenues will increase and your shareholder value and profitability will increase all at the same time. 
    The way we work as humans is that we cannot compare numbers. If you think about how many websites set up prices, they start with a low price, and then as you read left to right prices go up. That is wrong. What you want to do is start with a high price, which is called price anchoring. As you read left to right and top to bottom that’s going to be the first price you see, which makes what appears after that more affordable. This will lead to higher sales volume, as opposed to doing it the traditional way, where you have an anchor, which is lower than the rest of the prices, leading to a lower willingness to pay and a lower sales volume.
    Create a value stack, starting with 10,000 where customers see that first, then 6000, then the 4000, which will increase sales of both the 4000 and the 6000. What you really want to do is have a mega-large package for 30,000, which nobody will buy. Just there as an anchor point. One of the most successful anchor points was when Apple introduced ‘the watch’ a few years back. The normal Apple watch was 349 bucks which had exactly the same electronics as the limited edition in a gold case for 17,000. But it wasn't there to be sold. It was there as an anchor point. 
    To do this properly, have pricing as a centerpiece in your business strategy. Within an organization, the company's profit comes from only three variables, the total cost, the total sales volume, and the price of what you sell. Of the three, the price has the highest leverage that impacts profit the most. If the organization, from a managerial and executive point of view, knows how small price changes will change the profitability of the company, you will take your company to the next level. 
    In this episode:
    [01:23] Per, "the Price Whisperer" explains why he has this title
    He developed a process that would make every pricing experiment a successThe holistic view of how to price correctly
    p...

    • 21 min
    E302 - Digital literacy is a necessary leadership skill - learn to work with a tech team | with Sophia Matveeva

    E302 - Digital literacy is a necessary leadership skill - learn to work with a tech team | with Sophia Matveeva

    Sophia Matveeva is the CEO and founder of tech for non-techies an educational company and consultancy. She hosts the top-rated tech for the non-techies podcast, which teaches non-technical perspective professionals how to speak tech and succeed in the digital age through corporate and individual training programs. As a non-technical founder, Sophia has co-created apps and algorithms that have been used by 1000s. She sits on the board of the University of Chicago's alumni in the UK and also contributed to the Harvard Business Review, Financial Times, The Guardian, and forums on entrepreneurship and technology. 
    She realized that there was a huge gap for business people who wanted to have a great career, who are dedicated and hardworking, getting unexpectedly sucker punches, as the tech sector arrived. Speaking with other successful people who are non-technical in tech, she learned what she needed to know. Understanding the core concepts, rather than having the skills, knowing the backend, and the front end, and how they interact with each other. 
    As a leader, you may think, “I'd have to learn all these things, I have to do all these things, and I am never going to sleep”. Every year, another programming language or concept comes out and as soon as you learn C++ you get a new thing called Ruby on Rails or Python or Visual Basic. As long as you understand the possibilities, set a goal that is going to be applicable to the engineers, or the product team within a particular timeframe, and then it is up to them to figure out how to get there. 
    The most critical step for a digital leader who is not technical is to realize there is freedom in the absence of choice. Make a public commitment like setting up a weekly meeting with your technical counterpart. Tell them what you're working on and ask them what they're working on. Put yourself in a situation where you have to learn. Start listening to the tech on techies podcast to start learning the language of technology. Find people who are doing what you want to be doing. Get connected to them and speak to them, or just Google and read everything about them. What you need in this journey is information, and learning how to speak tech. But you also need to see how people that you identify with are doing it. 
    One of the biggest mistakes startup founders make is going straight to development, hiring developers, and actually forgetting the design process. There is a whole discipline called Design for technology. The first part of the design is user research. Hire a designer, listen to design podcasts, get some design books, and learn how to do user research properly, because every product is a solution to a problem. Make a prototype, which is something that feels like an app, with no code. Research, test the prototype, and iterate only when the prototype has been tested. Then work with developers, before ending up wasting a phenomenal amount of money. 
    In this episode:
    [01:40]  Sophia shares detail on her company called Tech for non-techies
    Helping people have great careers that are fulfilling, interesting, and future proofHow the tech sector came along and feeling unexpectedly sucker punched You don’t have to learn everything, or do everything, and never sleep, it doesn't work.
    [05:28]  Know the backend, and the front end, and how they interact with each other
    Don’t think that you have to learn and do everything when it’s not the caseUnderstand the possibilities and set a goal that is going to be applicable 
    [13:31]  The most critical step for a digital leader who’s not technical and is effective
    Get freedom in the absence of...

    • 29 min
    E301 - As couple partners, recognize each other's gifts and talents and assign resources and responsibilities based on tactics and strategies | with Kyle and Ariel Tresch

    E301 - As couple partners, recognize each other's gifts and talents and assign resources and responsibilities based on tactics and strategies | with Kyle and Ariel Tresch

    Kyle and Ariel Tresch are husband and wife digital marketing consultants who have built a thriving relationship and many thriving businesses over the last 10 years. The happy couple found themselves in a dark place a few years ago, as the everyday stresses of business began to take a toll on their relationship. Thankfully, Kyle and Ariel chose to fight for their marriage. And in doing so, they pioneered a brand new approach to doing life and business in a way that has allowed their relationship to flourish, and their businesses to skyrocket. Today, they are the founders of the mentorship company called ‘Couple Partners’, where Kyle and Ariel equip other entrepreneurial couples with proven strategies, to rapidly scale their businesses to seven figures, or more, all without compromising their relationship in the process. 
    Coming from what we would call humble beginnings. They were from a small town in Ohio and dated for seven years, and both had their own separate businesses during that time. After they self-funded their dream wedding in the Bahamas, which is where Ariel wanted to get married, they thought things were only going to get better from there. Unfortunately, that wasn't quite their experience. They became so focused on their individual pursuits and their businesses that they actually started to neglect their marriage. 
    They launched a coaching company this year called ‘Couple Partners’ and as soon as they launched that, they had couples from all over the world coming to them. As a result, they’re able to coach and mentor other couples in business, helping them not only grow businesses but actually stay unified in their relationship every step of the way.
    What they discovered was, instead of one person having to take all the spotlight, they were able to recognize each other's gifts and talents and assign those resources and responsibilities based on those tactics and strategies that they’re great at. One of the things that were the most helpful for them was to trust each other in terms of handling each individual responsibility. When they divide the roles and tasks, being able to trust the other person to own that role and to take care of business. 
    They have an ABCD formula that triggers all three areas of the brain in the right order, meaning you have to first trigger the survival area of the human brain by getting people's attention. Once you have their attention, trigger the limbic area of the brain. And then use the neocortex in order to get people to rationally make the choice to move forward. With the ABCD formula, you can sequence your communication in such a way that motivates any buyer, any visitor, any social media, post reader, or any video watcher to take a desired action that you want them to take.
    The A essentially stands for attention, you want to get their attention by sharing something that is new, something different, or something potentially dangerous.
    B is for stating the benefit your audience can get from your product or service.
    C stands for connection, once you get somebody's attention, and they know clearly what the benefit is of consuming your material, trigger the limbic part of the brain by connecting with your audience. 
    D is to demonstrate how you can help them because if you can get your audience to see how you can actually help them, they'll have all the logical reasons justified to take the action you want them to take.
    Kyle and Ariel want to challenge everybody that learns this, when going through the ABCD formula, to use it only for good, never use it to lie, never use it to cheat, never use it to steal, but only use it to positively influence somebody to take an action that is best for them. 
    In this episode:
    [02:27]  How Kyle and Ariel became successful couple partners
    Having their own separate businesses...

    • 31 min
    E300 - Strategy has no one size fits all approach, you need to find the one that works for you | with Beate Chelette

    E300 - Strategy has no one size fits all approach, you need to find the one that works for you | with Beate Chelette

    Beate Chelette is the founder of The Women's Code, a company devoted to helping leaders and visionaries grow their authority to scale their impact. Listed on the top 100 global thought leaders by People Home and one of the 50 must-follow women entrepreneurs according to HuffPost. Beate works with household names such as Chevron, Amazon, and Johnson and Johnson. She encourages entrepreneurs of all levels to turn their strategy into the demands and goals of their businesses so that they can grow their companies.
    She was a photographer and then became an accidental entrepreneur, by growing and building a business in a decade of bad luck and brutal adversity. Including fires, floods, riots, earthquakes, September 11, and a tsunami. Little did she know she was going to add a pandemic to her ever-growing repertoire of adversity. When she figured out how to crack the code, she was able to sell her business for millions of dollars to Bill Gates. She took what she learned, and put it into systems, processes, and workflows. Today, she works as a growth architect helping visionaries, and leaders, to scale their impact and grow their authority.
    Beate’s superpower is that she can take what people do, and turn it into their signature system and formula. Take all the different pieces under one umbrella, and ad additional steps. Magically everything you do makes sense because now it's become a step-by-step formula. A lot of people don't have the ability to understand the strategy or systems, especially creative people, or people with big ideas because it's just not how they're wired.
    She realized the three things people struggle with, are not having a signature system and not being able to articulate their uniqueness. Secondly, they don't have a strategy because it intimidates them. Third, is the authority building, which is really a client attraction system. Leads authority is not celebrity authority but industry expertise. She systematically created a support service and if you are within this system, this five-star success blueprint, she can help you diagnose where you are in that system, where you're stuck, and what steps you need to take next.
    The first thing is an uncovering, a personal conversation with Beate for about 30 to 45 minutes, to pinpoint where the misalignments are. It’s not about reinventing everything, it’s maximizing what you already have. Filling in the pieces that are missing, and working through her process, and her formula to assemble one solid picture. She believes that, whatever it is that you do, it must be aligned with who you are and she helps you figure out what that is.
    It is crucial that you figure out lead generation client interaction systems because if you miss that, you're going to be a dead fish in the water. Her personal favorite strategy right now is podcasting. When using your podcast as a lead gen tool, be deliberately strategic about where you go, where you show up, and who you speak to. If it's not a fit then don't waste your time. The strategies you use should support you and make you look good and get you in front of the right people that are attracted to that kind of person or that kind of brand that you're portraying.
    In this episode:
    [02:41]  Beate’s superpower is taking what people do and turning it into their signature system 
    Take all the different pieces, pack them under one umbrella, and ad additional stepsBeate speaks about the three things people struggle with mostly
    [06:38]  Identifying core issues to help them implement this five-star system
    Going deeper into these aspects within 30 to 45 minutes of conversationFilling in the pieces that are missing by working through her process
    [12:45]  Looking at different related strategies to...

    • 20 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
32 Ratings

32 Ratings

JeffyRay35 ,

Neat perspective!

Jeff has a neat perspective on marketing and his guests / content topics reflect that. Love it!

Walk 2 Wealth ,

Amazing show!

Such an amazing podcast! I love the quality of guests that come on every week!

ParkerTNash ,

Must subscribe!

Great host, great insights, always fun to listen to. In a handful of minutes you’ll learn something powerful to grow your business. Highly recommend subscribing.

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