22 episodes

The Padverb Podcast with KMO explores the interplay between technology, innovation, communication, and cognition, and examines the role knowledge networks and data-driven technologies play in helping progress along.

Our guests are interdisciplinary thinkers and innovators who have harnessed the creative power of combinatorial thinking. Some call them "dot connectors," others – "new knowledge synthesizers." We like to think of them as philosophers of the networked age.

The Padverb Podcast with KMO Padverb

    • Technology
    • 4.7 • 7 Ratings

The Padverb Podcast with KMO explores the interplay between technology, innovation, communication, and cognition, and examines the role knowledge networks and data-driven technologies play in helping progress along.

Our guests are interdisciplinary thinkers and innovators who have harnessed the creative power of combinatorial thinking. Some call them "dot connectors," others – "new knowledge synthesizers." We like to think of them as philosophers of the networked age.

    022 Digital Humanities with Ben Blatt

    022 Digital Humanities with Ben Blatt

    Ben Blatt is a former staff writer for Slate and the Harvard Lampoon. Ben is a numbers guy who has taken his fun approach to data journalism to topics such as Seinfeld, map-making, the Beatles, and Jeopardy.


    This conversation centers around Ben's book "Nabokov's Favorite Word is Mauve" (2017). It's a book about what we can learn about writing and authors based not on what they say, or what impressions we get from reading their books, but on something that results from applying rigorous data analysis to their actual texts. Specifically, KMO and Ben discuss:



    00:25 – Moneyball and its influence on Ben
    02:12 – The attraction of baseball for analytical people
    04:25 – Ben's interest in numbers and writing
    06:40 – Patterns, correlations, and writing advice
    10:00 – -LY adverbs
    12:00 – British vs American English
    14:40 – Bloke, blimey and the Harry Potter Effect
    16:00 – Loud vs quiet verbs
    19:08 – Pronoun and characters stats
    20:00 – Comparing authors' noise levels
    23:00 – Gender differences in literature
    27:50 – Professionals and amateurs: the statistical differences
    30:25 – Reading fan fiction
    32:50 – Restraining style choices to foster creativity
    34:50 – Revising one's novels
    36:00 – Fame and success affecting one's writing style
    38:00 – Data tools
    40:15 – Vonnegut
    42:10 – The validity of "write what you know"
    43:10 – Digital Humanities and Franco Moretti's "Atlas of the European Novel"
    47:15 – Ben's advice for aspiring writers
    50:15 – Creating writing and progress in AI
    52:05 – Ben's next project




    Ben (The Guest):



    Twitter: @BenBlatt




    KMO (The Host):



    Twitter: @Kayemmo
    en.padverb.com/kmo




    Padverb:



    The Padverb Telegram Channel:
    t.me/padverbpodcast

    • 57 min
    021 Cyber Republic with George Zarkadakis

    021 Cyber Republic with George Zarkadakis

    George Zarkadakis is the author of both fiction and non-fiction books, who describes himself as a science communicator, an artificial intelligence engineer, a futurist, and a digital innovation professional. His most recent book is called "Cyber Republic: Reinventing Democracy in the Age of Intelligent Machines" (MIT Press, 2021).


    In this conversation, KMO and George discuss:


    06:05 – Why democracy needs to be reinvented
    06:50 – Incorporating technologies into democracies
    18:10 – Animal labor's role in creating inequality and its implications
    25:40 – The psychological dimension and transforming spectators into actors
    32:40 – Financial time machine
    37:30 – Running out of units of measurement
    41:30 – Obviating the need for trust with the blockchain
    46:00 – Precarious creative gigs and AI's progress with artistic tools
    57:20 – Blockchain technology in search of problems to solve
    65:05 – The current web's dysfunctional nature
    01:07:50 – George's book




    George (The Guest):



    Twitter: @zarkadakis
    georgezarkadakis.com




    KMO (The Host):



    Twitter: @Kayemmo
    en.padverb.com/kmo




    Padverb:



    The Padverb Telegram Channel:
    t.me/padverbpodcast

    • 1 hr 15 min
    020 Moons and Planets with Francis Nimmo

    020 Moons and Planets with Francis Nimmo

    Francis Nimmo is a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research specialty is understanding the structure and evolution of rocky and icy planets.


    KMO and Francis discuss:


    02:30 – The importance of the James Webb and other telescopes
    03:40 – NASA probes, the AI connection, and technical challenges
    08:30 – The possibility of finding life and the radiation factor
    09:45 – Europa and Enceladus
    10:42 – Breaking molecules at fly-by speeds
    11:50 – Technology limitations and ambiguity in our search for life
    14:40 – The question of independent emergence of life
    16:05 – Subsurface oceans
    18:40 – Moons
    23:25 – Saturn's rings
    26:05 – The Kuiper belt and beyond
    28:00 – Autonomy and hibernation
    29:25 – Gas giants vs ice giants
    31:25 – Pluto
    35:50 – Mission re-assignment
    40:10 – Canned apes and getting to Mars
    42:30 – Sci-Fi future we were promised
    44:15 – Venus
    49:40 – Mercury
    53:45 – Comets
    56:05 – The Earth
    57:40 – Deep Time




    Francis (The Guest):



    websites.pmc.ucsc.edu/~fnimmo/
    Francis Nimmo @ Wikipedia




    KMO (The Host):



    Twitter: @Kayemmo
    en.padverb.com/kmo




    Padverb:



    The Padverb Telegram Channel:
    t.me/padverbpodcast

    • 1 hr 5 min
    019 Forget and Imagine with Lauren Aguirre

    019 Forget and Imagine with Lauren Aguirre

    Lauren Aguirre is an award-winning science journalist who has produced documentaries, short-form video series, podcasts, interactive games and blogs for the PBS series "Nova." She has covered everything from asteroids to human origins to art restoration, but is particularly fascinated by the brain. "The Memory Thief" is Lauren's first book.


    In this conversation, Lauren and KMO discuss:



    02:03 – Lauren's memory incident
    06:42 – Waking up and not knowing where you are
    08:28 – Retrograde and anterograde amnesia
    13:10 – The fentanyl connection
    20:53 – Experimental brain surgery
    24:18 – Amnesia sufferers' self-worth
    29:13 – Faking anterograde amnesia
    31:18 – Science communication
    33:38 – Disappointment in science
    34:53 – The Memory Thief's target audience
    36:28 – Multilayer narratives
    39:13 – Our shared experience of forgetting
    43:08 – Remembering our remembering of events
    44:38 – The trauma connection
    47:35 – Optogenetics
    49:08 – The scientific process and the pursuit of truth



    Lauren Aguirre (The Guest):



    laurenaguirre.com
    @lsaguirre




    KMO (The Host):



    Twitter: @Kayemmo
    en.padverb.com/kmo




    Padverb:



    The Padverb Telegram Channel:
    t.me/padverbpodcast

    • 54 min
    018 Humanoids Need Not Apply with Carla Diana

    018 Humanoids Need Not Apply with Carla Diana

    Carla Diana is a designer, author, and educator who explores the impact of future technologies through hands-on experiments in product design and tangible interaction. Her latest book, "My Robot Gets Me: How Social Design Can Make New Products More Human," published by Harvard Business Review Press, came out in March 2021. Carla and KMO discuss: 02:20 – Carla's book's title 02:30 – What 4D design is 04:40 – Robot friends 13:05 – What a robot is 21:10 – What "entities" are 28:55 – Robots' association with labor 33:28 – Robots interacting with the environment 37:15 – Robots, faces, and shared attention 44:45 – Whether humanoid robots a good idea at all 48:50 – Science fiction affecting robot design and key concepts from Carla Carla (The Guest): carladiana.com KMO (The Host): Twitter: @Kayemmo en.padverb.com/kmo Padverb: The Padverb Telegram Channel: t.me/padverbpodcast Featured quote “Humans were still not only the cheapest robots around, but also, for many tasks, the only robots that could do the job. They were self-reproducing robots too. They showed up and worked generation after generation; give them 3000 calories a day and a few amenities, a little time off, and a strong jolt of fear, and you could work them at almost anything. Give them some ameliorative drugs and you had a working class, reified and coglike.” ― Kim Stanley Robinson, 2312

    • 1 hr 2 min
    017 Us and Not Us with Michael J. Spivey

    017 Us and Not Us with Michael J. Spivey

    Michael J. Spivey is a professor of cognitive science at the University of California Merced. He earned his BA in Psychology at the University of California Santa Cruz and his PhD in Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the University of Rochester. After 12 years as a psychology professor at Cornell University, Michael moved to UC Merced to help build a department of cognitive and information sciences. He has published over 100 journal articles and book chapters on the embodiment of cognition and interactions between language, vision, memory, syntax, semantics, and motor movement. His most recent book, published in 2020, is "Who You Are: The Science of Connectedness." (MIT Press)



    In this conversation, KMO and Michael discuss:



    03:20 – The book's title and table of contents; externalism and egregore
    07:30 – The role of the prefrontal cortex in our conception of self
    11:30 – Non-scientific view of interactions between brain parts
    12:50 – Mental representations of the world and the tricks they can play on us
    15:35 – Letting go of oneself
    17:25 – The value of familiar environments
    18:45 – The futility of widely used time-management tricks
    19:40 – Extending our mind past our skin
    25:20 – The skipped question of emergent group intentions and desires
    26:15 – Connecting to other bodies and life forms; emergence, again
    28:25 – Murmurations and being in charge of a flock
    28:45 – Boundaries between objects
    35:20 – Perceiving objects as extensions of ourselves
    37:02 – Virtual reality and tracking the direction of gaze
    43:15 – AI and dogs
    44:55 – Computer-generated imagery; deep fakes and their antidotes
    49:35 – Extending your sense of self to the planetary scale
    53:55 – Apocalyptic predictions, prepping, and the future of civilization
    55:47 – Going beyond our planet and contacting life elsewhere
    58:20 – Anti-natalism, suffering, and feeling one with the universe
    1:02:28 – Michael's closing points; practical advice in the book




    Michael (The Guest):



    Michael's page at ucmerced.edu
    Who You Are at MIT Press




    KMO (The Host):



    Twitter: @Kayemmo
    en.padverb.com/kmo




    Padverb:



    The Padverb Telegram Channel:
    t.me/padverbpodcast

    • 1 hr 8 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

Ergo, Ergo ,

Highly recommend

KMO is the best interviewer I’ve ever heard. He asks intelligent, informed, relevant questions and is a great listener. Also, it’s obvious that he’s a humble, heterodox thinker. Whether you are specifically interested in any of the topics on the Padverb Podcast or just enjoy a quality, thoughtful conversation, I encourage anyone to give it a try.

Archaic Revival ,

Kmo is the thinking man’s thinking man

Cutting edge topics, interesting guests, and a great host. Wonderful podcast!

fryguyerd ,

Me like kmo

Me like kmo
He wise and humble
Also mind is open to be wrong and change mind
Prolly smell good
Like a wet tree I think

Top Podcasts In Technology

Lex Fridman
Jason Calacanis
Cal Newport
NPR
Jack Rhysider
The New York Times

You Might Also Like