14 episodes

This weekly course was presented by Thomas E. Woods, Jr., in 2006-2007.Download the complete audio of this event (ZIP) here.

The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History Mises Institute

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    • 4.2, 158 Ratings

This weekly course was presented by Thomas E. Woods, Jr., in 2006-2007.Download the complete audio of this event (ZIP) here.

    1. Themes and Lessons from Colonial America

    1. Themes and Lessons from Colonial America

    Fischer’s book Albion’s Seed described four British folkways into the colonies.  The four were Puritans to New England, aristocrats to Virginia, Quakers to Pennsylvania, and borderland immigrants to Appalachian backcountry.

    2. The Constitution: Four Disputed Clauses

    2. The Constitution: Four Disputed Clauses

    As of 1790, all original thirteen colonies had ratified the Constitution. Four clauses have caused great trouble ever since: The War Powers Clause; The Commerce Clause; The Necessary and Proper Clause; and, The General Welfare Clause.

    3. The Principles of '98

    3. The Principles of '98

    1798 was an important year. The Principles of ’98 influenced all of American history. The Alien and Sedition Acts and the Kentucky Resolutions revealed these principles.

    4. Lysander Spooner and Other Antebellum Radicalism

    4. Lysander Spooner and Other Antebellum Radicalism

    Lysander Spooner in the antebellum period has been overlooked. He was a radical abolitionist lawyer. He wrote The Unconstitutionality of Slavery. William Lloyd Garrison felt the Constitution was a bloody pro-slavery compact.

    5. Secession and the American Experience

    5. Secession and the American Experience

    States had the right to secede. The War Between the States was not launched to free slaves. Lincoln believed that whites were superior and favored the deportation of freed slaves. The South was for free trade; the North wanted protectionism.

    6. Secession and War

    6. Secession and War

    Secession is a progressive, not a reactionary force. It is civilized. Jefferson Davis argued that because secession is not mentioned in the Constitution it is retained by the states under the Tenth Amendment. Thomas Jefferson said that the time for separation had not yet come.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
158 Ratings

158 Ratings

Magicmarker44 ,

Tom at his best

Tom Woods is one of the best historian, economists and political thinkers around. His presentations in this podcast are extremely interesting and I highly recommend it.

Pruszkowski ,

It’s wonderful!

But what’s the name of the speaker??
What’s the name of the speaker’s book?

SailingTom ,

AKA Lies by Omission

This is a wonderful academic look at the constitution and how the current interpretation has been distorted beyond recognition.
Every parent needs to be exposed to this and their children. It appears we have already lost at least a generation.
My only wish is that this had continued up to the current day. Thank you Mr Woods for doing this series.

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