237 episodes

Welcome to The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman, where we give you insights into the mind, brain, behavior and creativity. Each episode we’ll feature a guest who will stimulate your mind, and give you a greater understanding of your self, others, and the world we live in. Hopefully, we’ll also provide a glimpse into human possibility! Thanks for listening and enjoy the podcast. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-psychology-podcast/support

The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufma‪n‬ Scott Barry Kaufman

    • Social Sciences
    • 4.5 • 1.2K Ratings

Welcome to The Psychology Podcast with Scott Barry Kaufman, where we give you insights into the mind, brain, behavior and creativity. Each episode we’ll feature a guest who will stimulate your mind, and give you a greater understanding of your self, others, and the world we live in. Hopefully, we’ll also provide a glimpse into human possibility! Thanks for listening and enjoy the podcast. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-psychology-podcast/support

    Sam Harris || Free Will (Part 1)

    Sam Harris || Free Will (Part 1)

    Today it’s great to have Sam Harris on the podcast. Sam is the author of five New York Times best sellers, including The End of Faith, Letter to a Christian Nation, The Moral Landscape, Free Will, Lying, and Waking Up. The End of Faith won the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. His writing and public lectures cover a wide range of topics—neuroscience, moral philosophy,religion, meditation practice, human violence, rationality—but generally focus on how a growing understanding of ourselves and the world is changing our sense of how we should live. He also hosts the Making Sense Podcast, which was selected by Apple as one of the “iTunes Best” and has won a Webby Award for best podcast in the Science & Education category.

    Topics

    [1:57] Sam’s reflections on his childhood

    [7:18] Sam’s interest in martial arts

    [8:04] Sam’s experience with MDMA

    [12:09] How Sam ended up on the Dalai Lama’s security detail

    [16:39] Sam’s experience with meditation teacher Sayadaw U Pandita

    [23:12] Dualistic vs Nondualistic mindfulness

    [24:34] Sam’s experience with Dzogchen meditation

    [28:27] Sam’s dream about Dilgo Khyentse

    [34:15] Sam’s experience with fiction writing

    [37:50] Scott questions Sam’s position on free will

    [41:33] Sam’s disagreement with Daniel Dennett

    [42:41] Sam’s take on free will and human interaction

    [46:38] Why Sam thinks we’re getting “free will” wrong


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    • 58 min
    Simon Baron-Cohen || How Autism Drives Human Invention

    Simon Baron-Cohen || How Autism Drives Human Invention

    Today it’s great to chat with Simon Baron-Cohen. Simon is professor of psychology and psychiatry and director of the Autism Research Centre at Cambridge University. He is the author of six hundred scientific articles and four books, including The Science of Evil and The Essential Difference.

    [2:47] Simon’s evolution of thought on autism

    [5:19] How the social realm of autism has evolved

    [8:12] The difference between autism and psychopathy

    [10:26] The role of affective vs cognitive empathy

    [12:37] How to navigate autism amidst cancel culture

    [14:18] Having autistic traits vs being on the autism spectrum

    [17:52] How autism drives human invention

    [22:11] The “systemizing mechanism” of the brain

    [24:03] The role of “if-and-then patterns” in autistic individuals

    [26:41] Simon’s thoughts on language acquisition

    [27:48] “The empathy circuit”

    [37:28] The role of creativity in autism

    [41:19] The Brain Types Study

    [42:43] The biological basis of creativity and autism

    [45:24] Why monkeys don’t skateboard

    [48:12] Why language isn’t a necessary precursor to invention

    [55:12] How Scott measured implicit learning and pattern-seeking

    [59:28] Why Simon’s work has sparked some pushback

    [1:01:04] How to support autistic people

    [1:05:45] How we can nurture the inventors of the future

    [1:07:18] Sex differences in autism


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    • 1 hr 16 min
    Jennifer Aaker & Naomi Bagdonas || How Humor Can Save The World

    Jennifer Aaker & Naomi Bagdonas || How Humor Can Save The World

    Today it’s great to chat with Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas on the podcast. Dr. Jennifer Aaker is the General Atlantic Professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and a leading expert on how purpose and meaning shape individual choices and how technology can positively impact both human well-being and company growth. Her work has been widely published in lead in scientific journals and featured in The Economist, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, and Science. A recipient of the Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award and the MBA Professor of the Year, Aaker counts winning a dance-off in the early 1980s among her greatest feats.

    Naomi Bagdonas is a Lecturer at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and an Executive Coach. She helps leaders be more creative, flexible and resilient in the face of change by facilitating interactive sessions for Fortune 100 companies and coaching executives and celebrities for appearances ranging from Saturday Night Live to the Today Show. Formally trained at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, Bagdonas performs at comedy venues and teaches improv in San Francisco’s county jail. Her constant stream of foster dogs describe her as gullible and full of treats.

    Topics

    [3:15] Why the world needs more humor

    [6:06] Humor at the expense of others/4 Styles of humor

    [8:49] Origin story of “Humor, Seriously”

    [12:51] The bottom-line value of humor

    [18:19] How to infuse humor in the workplace

    [22:05] Jennifer’s thoughts on humorlessness

    [24:58] Cultivating the comedian’s toolbox

    [28:30] How to create your own signature joke

    [30:17] Scott and Naomi’s experiences at Upright Citizen’s Brigade

    [34:11] The link between humor and mental health

    [37:45] The relationship between status and humor

    [42:17] The value of self-deprecating humor

    [44:10] The importance of context in humor

    [50:22] One of Jennifer’s pranks on her students

    [51:21] Biological vs cultural dimensions of humor

    [54:58] How humor reflects elements of our society

    [58:27] Should there be moral rules for comedy?

    [1:03:13] Why truth and misdirection are at the core of comedy


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    • 1 hr 4 min
    Adam Grant || Think Again

    Adam Grant || Think Again

    Today it’s great to have Adam Grant on the podcast. Adam is an organizational psychologist at Wharton, where he has been the top-rated professor for seven straight years. He is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of four books that have sold millions of copies and been translated into 35 languages. His work has been praised by J.J. Abrams, Bill and Melinda Gates, and many others. Grant’s TED talks have been viewed more than 20 million times, and he hosts the chart-topping TED podcast WorkLife with Adam Grant. He has been recognized as one of the world’s 10 most influential management thinkers, Fortune’s 40 under 40, Oprah’s Super Soul 100, and a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader. Adam received distinguished scientific achievement awards from the American Psychological Association and the National Science Foundation. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife Allison and their three children.

    Topics

    [4:17] What is rethinking?

    [7:02] “Preachers, prosecutors, and politicians”

    [8:08] Why we need to cultivate a scientific attitude

    [11:48] The path to being effective

    [12:17] Linking character and success

    [16:10] Adam’s new construct of character

    [20:42] The importance of authenticity and integrity

    [25:05] The role of consistency in exercising our values

    [30:37] The role of integrity in politics

    [33:07] The tension between personality and pursuing values

    [36:08] “A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing”

    [38:32] The trap of cognitive entrenchment

    [40:50] The importance of having diverse interests

    [41:40] Cognitive underpinnings of thinking again

    [42:31] Actively open-minded thinking

    [45:53] The benefits of disagreeableness

    [51:42] Selfishness as the 6th factor of personality

    [57:31] Why “agreeing to disagree” is wrong

    [1:00:04] How to destabilize stereotypes

    [1:05:25] Psychological safety in universities

    [1:09:40] What “good faith” means

    [1:11:18] Crossing psychological safety with accountability

    [1:12:59] What Scott thinks Adam should rethink

    [1:17:26] The importance of benevolence and universalism


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    • 1 hr 23 min
    Steven Kotler || The Art of Impossible

    Steven Kotler || The Art of Impossible

    Today it’s great to chat with Steven Kotler on the podcast. Steven is a New York Times bestselling author, an award-winning journalist, and the Executive Director of the Flow Research Collective. He is one of the world’s leading experts on human performance. He is the author of nine bestsellers (out of thirteen books total), including The Art of Impossible, The Future Is Faster Than You Think, Stealing Fire, The Rise of Superman, Bold and Abundance. His work has been nominated for two Pulitzer Prizes, translated into over 40 languages, and appeared in over 100 publications, including the New York Times Magazine, Wired, Atlantic Monthly, TIME and the Harvard Business Review. Steven is also the cohost of Flow Research Collective Radio. Along with his wife, author Joy Nicholson, he is the cofounder of the Rancho de Chihuahua, a hospice and special needs dog sanctuary.

    Topics

    [4:04] Understanding human potential

    [9:58] Why not going big is bad for us

    [11:22] Insights into the flow state

    [15:06] "Biology scales, personality doesn’t"

    [18:44] The importance of confidence and grit

    [19:05] Physical vs. psychological recovery

    [20:51] Conscious vs. unconscious self-esteem

    [22:49] The difference between impossible and Impossible

    [25:21] How to get to Impossible

    [27:39] Reflections on failure

    [31:14] Steven’s thoughts on bravery

    [32:51] Fear as a compass

    [33:44] Exercising clarity of vision

    [34:37] Confronting physical barriers to performance

    [36:57] Steven's dimensions of grit

    [40:51] How practice makes confident

    [43:31] How the "courage to be” may be a form of grit

    [44:54] Steven’s thoughts on passion

    [49:34] The role of purpose in peak performance

    [53:16] How to be a high performer

    [55:09] The "habit of ferocity"


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    • 1 hr
    Noam Chomsky || On Human Nature and Human Progress

    Noam Chomsky || On Human Nature and Human Progress

    Today it’s great to have the legendary Noam Chomsky on the podcast. Noam is a public intellectual, linguist, and political activist. He’s the author of many influential books, including Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media, and his latest book with Robert Pollin called Climate Crisis and The Green New Deal: The Political Economy of Saving The Planet. Chomsky is also known for helping to initiate and sustain the cognitive revolution. He’s the Laureate Professor of Linguistics at The University of Arizona and Institute Professor Emeritus at MIT.

    Topics

    [02:06] The cognitive revolution of the ‘50s and ‘60s

    [03:49] Noam’s first encounter with behaviorism

    [12:41] What it was like to be part of the cognitive revolution

    [17:49] Implicit learning and artificial grammar

    [26:30] Noam’s view on modern-day behavioral genetics

    [28:05] Noam's thoughts on intelligence

    [32:02] Noam’s take on creativity

    [38:41] Chomsky's view vs. Foucault's view

    [42:49] Noam’s thoughts on modern-day social justice movements

    [45:50] Is there such a thing as human nature?

    [49:06] Identity vs. human nature

    [54:54] Noam’s views on race consciousness in America

    [59:16] Why Noam thinks Trump is the worst criminal in human history

    [1:00:34] How can democrats appeal to Trump supporters?

    [1:03:47] Cancel culture

    [1:05:10] The complexities of the slogan "defund the police"

    [1:08:36] Noam reflects on his life regrets

    [1:10:17] Chomsky's life advice


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    • 1 hr 13 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
1.2K Ratings

1.2K Ratings

Seemysparkle ,

Love this podcast

The conversation is educational and upbeat. Thanks for making this podcast for us to enjoy!!!

Panbozz ,

Treasure Chomsky

Self evident.

lorireviews ,

Became a lesser version of what it could be...

Somehow this is now super watered down. It isn’t really deep or insightful, just political. I can find this anywhere. Bleh. Obvious bias isn’t the issue, it’s the lack of differing perspectives and expertise with guests. If I can guess the world views of every guest before I even know anything about them, then the show is severely lacking in complexity.
Everyone has biases, however, this show could be great if they actually followed a more scientific approach, which requires an open quest for knowledge & truth, no matter the discomfort. So disappointing because this show has potential, but refuses to reach it.

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