29 episodes

The Speak Good Podcast: Using the Power of Communication for Good. Hosted by Brad Phillips, this podcast examines challenging subjects through the lens of communication. Sharp thinkers, public figures, researchers, and other experts join Brad for each episode to discuss topics such as how to counter misinformation, bridge racial divides, build stronger organizations, and manage our imposter syndrome. For more information, visit https://www.throughlinegroup.com/podcast/

The Speak Good Podcast Brad Phillips, Throughline Group

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 22 Ratings

The Speak Good Podcast: Using the Power of Communication for Good. Hosted by Brad Phillips, this podcast examines challenging subjects through the lens of communication. Sharp thinkers, public figures, researchers, and other experts join Brad for each episode to discuss topics such as how to counter misinformation, bridge racial divides, build stronger organizations, and manage our imposter syndrome. For more information, visit https://www.throughlinegroup.com/podcast/

    Brad and Christina’s 6 Presentation Tips for Advanced Speakers

    Brad and Christina’s 6 Presentation Tips for Advanced Speakers

    For more than a year, you’ve heard a lone voice at the helm of The Speak Good Podcast, host and Chief Executive Throughliner Brad Phillips. Today, you meet Throughline Group’s other half. Listen in as partner Christina Mozaffari joins Brad to reveal six advanced public speaking tips – from how to present more effective slides to how to improve your look during a virtual presentation.

    Far from a silent partner, Christina is an experienced trainer, a talented communications coach, and a self-proclaimed recovering (and Emmy award-winning) journalist who uses the best of what she learned on network news – as well as years of public speaking and media training – to help Throughline’s clients become better communicators.

    After more than 10 years of working together, they still love what they do and the opportunity to find the right set of skills, techniques, and strategies for each client to excel.

    GUEST: Christina Mozaffari, Partner, Throughline Group
    Christina is a partner in Throughline Group, a media and presentation training firm based in New York City and Washington, D.C. She has prepared some of the nation's most-visible government agencies to excel during high-pressured crisis responses, worked with hundreds of top corporate executives and developed a particular talent for training mission-driven nonprofits. She previously worked at NBC News, where she produced stories for NBC Nightly News, The Today Show, and Hardball with Chris Matthews. As a journalist, she covered everything from the 2008 presidential campaign and Hurricane Katrina to the election of Pope Benedict in Rome and the war in Iraq. She was awarded an Emmy as part of NBC’s team coverage of 2008’s presidential election night.
    Follow us on Twitter @speakgoodpod
    Check out our blog
    Got an episode idea

    • 34 min
    Two-Time World Debating Champion on How to Win Arguments

    Two-Time World Debating Champion on How to Win Arguments

    Can you apply the rules of debate to your next dinner conversation? Author and champion debater Bo Seo sees parallels between formal verbal sparring and informal chatter around the table. In this episode, we talk about his book, Good Arguments: How Debate Teaches Us to Listen and Be Heard. Bo makes the case that anyone can relay the skills needed for successful competitive debate into real-life conversations. He says one of the most important skills you can cultivate has nothing to do with the words you use, but rather the attention you bring to truly listening to what your fellow conversationalists are saying. Bo says when you make authentic connections with your verbal opponents and empathize with their stance and opinions, debate becomes transformative – an exercise that not only makes for better personal relationships but can create a more civil society. Bo shares tips and techniques on how to effectively make your case at home, work, and play.

    GUEST: Bo Seo, Author, Good Arguments: How Debate Teaches Us to Listen and Be Heard
    Bo Seo is simultaneously a world-class debater, a journalist, and a law student at Harvard Law School. In all those facets of his life, strong communication skills are a must. In his new book, Bo draws on his own experiences as a two-time world champion debater and a former coach of the Australian national debating team and the Harvard College Debating Union to share the most effective methods in hashing out disagreements – whether they take place on a debate stage or in a coffee shop. Bo is one of the most recognized figures in the global debate community, having won the World Schools Debating Championship and the World Universities Debating Championship. His articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, CNN, the Australian Financial Review, and other publications. He’s a panelist on the prime-time Australian debate program, The Drum. Born in South Korea, he grew up in Australia before heading off to Tsinghua University in China where he received a master’s degree in public policy. He’s now studying law at Harvard Law School.
    Follow us on Twitter @speakgoodpod
    Check out our blog
    Got an episode idea?

    • 54 min
    Former New York Times Editor on His Bad Workplace Experience

    Former New York Times Editor on His Bad Workplace Experience

    As the former editor-in-chief of the lifestyle blog Lifehacker, Alan Henry was well aware of the power of actionable advice in helping others maximize their potential. Little did he know he’d need some of that same advice to knock down professional obstacles that he faced after becoming the editor of the Smarter Living section of The New York Times.

    In this episode, Alan talks about his new book, Seen, Heard, and Paid: The New Work Rules for the Marginalized, in which he explores the struggles he faced at The Times as a person of color. Often overlooked and kept from interesting work and career-advancing opportunities, he developed a new set of work rules to allow people of color, women, and LGBTQ+ employees to have the same access to success, interesting work, and career opportunities as those with more privilege. 

    Now the senior editor at WIRED, Alan shares some of the new hacks he’s learned for career advancement and offers advice to managers on how to get the most out of all of your team members.

    GUEST: Alan Henry, Editor, Journalist, and Author, Seen, Heard, and Paid: The New Work Rules for the Marginalized

    In his own words, Alan Henry is a writer, editor, blogger, gamer, streamer, classy geek, recovering physicist, unapologetically Black, and severely opinionated. He’s also a journalist, editor, and author of the book Seen, Heard, and Paid: The New Work Rules for the Marginalized. He’s spent his career sharing the journalism that helps readers make readers embrace technology and use it to work and live better. He’s the former editor of the productivity and lifestyle blog Lifehacker and previously worked as the Smarter Living editor at The New York Times. He is the author of the newsletter “Productivity Without Privilege,” which was launched by his  2019 New York Times piece. He’s currently the senior editor at WIRED and based in New York City.
    LINKS:
    Seen, Heard, and Paid: The New Work Rules for the Marginalized
    Productivity, Without Privilege newsletter 

    Follow us on Twitter @speakgoodpod
    Check out our blog
    Got an episode idea?

    • 47 min
    A Republican and a Democrat Walk Into a Bar...

    A Republican and a Democrat Walk Into a Bar...

    A Republican and a Democrat walk into a bar. They see a liberal buying a conservative a drink, while a priest chats with a rabbi and minister. A CEO is talking with a union leader. A grandmother is there with her granddaughter, while an environmentalist is speaking to an oil company exec. “Is this a joke?” one of them asks. The bartender points to a sign above the bar. It reads: “No talking about religion or politics. It’s how we stay in business.”

    That’s not how our guest Mónica Guzmán thinks we should be doing business. She believes talking openly about today’s issues brings about better solutions. Yet, she has witnessed how today’s political polarization leads to discord and strained communication among family members, friends, co-workers, and community leaders. In this episode, this director of digital and storytelling at Braver Angels, a nonprofit working to depolarize America, shares ways we can broaden our perspectives to become better listeners and better communicators. Do you want more moments of “I never thought of it that way?” We talk to Mónica about how to make those moments happen.

    Guest Mónica Guzmán
    Mónica Guzmán is the author of I Never Thought Of It That Way: How to Have Fearlessly Curious Conversations in Dangerously Divided Times. She embraces conversations that encourage all participants to think about and assess their unique biases, prejudices, and feelings on matters large and small. This journalist, author, and community collaborator has worked to find the intersection between communications and personal perspectives, so as to generate a greater understanding of where we all stand in times of disruption, political polarization, and a search for truth. Guzmán also is the director of digital and storytelling at Braver Angels, a nonprofit working to depolarize America, and host of the Crosscut interview series Northwest Newsmakers. She’s a 2019 fellow at the Henry M. Jackson Foundation, where she studied social and political division, and a 2016 fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University, where she studied how journalists can better meet the needs of a participatory public.
    LINKS:
    I Never Thought Of It That Way: How To Have Fearlessly Curious Conversations in Dangerously Divided Times 
    Braver Angels
    The Reclaim Curiosity Newsletter 
    Follow us on Twitter @speakgoodpod
    Check out our blog
    Got an episode idea?

    • 45 min
    What Is Capitalism, Anyway? (Part 2)

    What Is Capitalism, Anyway? (Part 2)

    For centuries, America has put its collective faith in democracy and capitalism, social and economic systems that have been tried and tested during numerous cultural, economic, political, and civil shifts. Our guest, Jonathan Levy, has identified four distinct ages that have shaped America’s economy and led us to where we are today.

    In a previous episode, Levy talked about how America rose from its agrarian beginnings to become a world economic power. In this episode, he shares how America wobbled but didn’t fall during the Great Depression, only to be hobbled once again – nearly 80 years later – during the 2008 market meltdown. 

    What’s the next age? Levy theorizes where we might be headed, and the principles we might want to consider in shaping a prosperous and equitable future for all.

    GUEST: Jonathan Levy is the author of Ages of American Capitalism: A History of the United States.
    In it, he tracks the history of American economics from colonial times to the Great Recession. Throughout, he uses a historian’s eye to look at how modern economic life and American capitalism were shaped through wealth acquisition, as well as social and fiscal policies. Jonathan is a history professor at the University of Chicago, where his research and teaching spans the 19th and 20th centuries – specifically the relationships among business history, political economy, legal history, and the history of ideas and culture. He’s also a member of the  John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought at the university and the faculty director of the Law, Letters, and Society program. In 2012, he published his first book, Freaks of Fortune: The Emerging World of Capitalism and Risk in America. He lives in Chicago.
    LINKS:
    Ages of American Capitalism: A History of the United States
    The Feegee Mermaid
    The Great Depression
    The New Deal
    The gold standard
    The Wagner Act

    Follow us on Twitter @speakgoodpod
    Check out our blog
    Got an episode idea?

    • 37 min
    What Is Capitalism, Anyway? (Part 1)

    What Is Capitalism, Anyway? (Part 1)

    How did America become the world’s largest economy? By constantly evolving and responding to economic disruptions, says our guest Jonathan Levy.

    Across four distinct ages, the United States moved from an agrarian past to a capitalistic future, fueled by an economic system in which investors and consumers bank on future profits, while the government directs and sustains that growth through fiscal and legislative policy.

    In this episode, Levy talks about that shift, as well as the impact that enslaved labor, particularly in the south, had on U.S. economic growth and accumulation of wealth. Given the breadth and depth of the economic history of America, we’ve divided our interview with Jonathan into two parts.

    In Part I, Jonathan talks about America’s leap from its colonial past to its emergence as the world’s most productive economy by the early 1900s.

    In Part 2, he’ll bring us through the New Deal and into our present-day boom-and-bust cycles, as well as theorize where American capitalism is headed next.

    GUEST:
    Jonathan Levy is the author of Ages of American Capitalism: A History of the United States. In it, he tracks the history of American economics from colonial times to the Great Recession. Throughout, he uses a historian’s eye to look at how modern economic life and American capitalism were shaped through wealth acquisition, as well as social and fiscal policies. Jonathan is a history professor at the University of Chicago, where his research and teaching spans the 19th and 20th centuries – specifically the relationships among business history, political economy, legal history, and the history of ideas and culture. He’s also a member of the  John U. Nef Committee on Social Thought at the university and the faculty director of the Law, Letters, and Society program. In 2012, he published his first book, Freaks of Fortune: The Emerging World of Capitalism and Risk in America. He lives in Chicago.
     LINKS:
    Ages of American Capitalism: A History of the United States (https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/227741/ages-of-american-capitalism-by-jonathan-levy/) 
    The American Civil War https://www.britannica.com/event/American-Civil-War 
    The Great Depression https://www.history.com/topics/great-depression/great-depression-history/ 
    The New Deal https://www.loc.gov/classroom-materials/united-states-history-primary-source-timeline/great-depression-and-world-war-ii-1929-1945/franklin-delano-roosevelt-and-the-new-deal/ 
    The gold standard https://theconversation.com/whats-the-gold-standard-and-why-does-the-us-benefit-from-a-dollar-that-isnt-tied-to-the-value-of-a-glittery-hunk-of-metal-150340

    Follow us on Twitter @speakgoodpod
    Check out our blog
    Got an episode idea?

    • 45 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

Ryan Honick ,

Thank You, Brad

The Speak Good podcast is one of the most thoughtful and engaging in the field of communications that I’ve heard. I have followed Brad’s work for over a decade, and he has undoubtably made me a smarter, more well-rounded communications professional with his insights and expertise. Brad and his guests provide thought-provoking conversations around myriad topics and social issues.

I have always appreciated Brad’s willingness to admit where he still needs to grow and openly have the tough conversations that facilitate that evolution. Brad himself is a gifted interviewer and he invites other professionals in their fields; authors, advocates, and academics to enrich the conversations and explore how effective communication and persuasion permeate all areas of our lives. Whether you are a communications professional or not, Brad’s podcast will make you think, engage your mind, and teach effective communication strategies no matter your audience.

Brad is also very genuine person whose willingness to have tough conversations around very sensitive topics makes him a rare find. The Speak Good podcast is just one of the ways Brad aims to leave the world a better place and I appreciate what he continually puts out in the world.

purple516 ,

All speak good

For years I have listened only to politics podcasts, especially during Trump years. But look at what I’ve been missing…. Brad finds great people and asks tough but polite questions. I’m going back to the ones I missed

Giants2010WSChamps ,

Speak Good excellent resource for communications professionals

I am a big fan of Brad Phillips. I have his Mr. Media Training guidebook and have shared multiple copies with people I have represented in communications through the years. I was excited when Brad launched the Speak Good podcast. He has lived up to my expectations, delivering relevant, helpful and interesting speakers on current newsworthy and vexing topics. I listened to his interview with Kirsten Powers yesterday (Thanksgiving 2021) before going to our family dinner and was inspired. Brad is sensitive to and inclusive of all viewpoints. His expert guests take the time to break down issues and provide helpful explanations and tips. I highly recommend the Speak Good podcast and look forward to more episodes.

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

C13Originals | Team Downey
Wondery
iHeartPodcasts
This American Life
Glennon Doyle & Cadence13
WNYC Studios

You Might Also Like

NPR
Freakonomics Radio + Stitcher
New York Times Opinion
TED