28 episodes

We obsess about food to learn more about people. The Sporkful isn't for foodies, it's for eaters. Hosted by Dan Pashman of Cooking Channel's You're Eating It Wrong and the book Eat More Better. A Stitcher Production.

The Sporkful Stitcher

    • Food
    • 4.6, 2.6K Ratings

We obsess about food to learn more about people. The Sporkful isn't for foodies, it's for eaters. Hosted by Dan Pashman of Cooking Channel's You're Eating It Wrong and the book Eat More Better. A Stitcher Production.

    Plantation Rum Is Changing Its Name. Is That Enough?

    Plantation Rum Is Changing Its Name. Is That Enough?

    Plus a rum expert’s summer cocktail tips...The word “plantation” has been used in food branding to conjure images of a romanticized, whitewashed American South. (Think “Plantation Mint Tea” or “Plantation Chicken.”) Food writer Osayi Endolyn, whose work inspired our 2019 episode on this topic, “When White People Say Plantation,” returns to discuss Plantation Rum’s name change, as well as similar recent changes by Bigelow Tea and Aunt Jemima. Later in the show, we talk with bartender and rum expert Shannon Mustipher, author of “Tiki: Modern Tropical Cocktails.” She explains why she doesn’t have a problem serving Plantation Rum, and walks us through some of her favorite rum-based cocktails. These drinks pair especially well with difficult conversations.

    Get 500+ more great Sporkful episodes from our catalog and lots of other Stitcher goodness when you sign up for Stitcher Premium: www.StitcherPremium.com/Sporkful (promo code: SPORKFUL).

    Transcript available at www.sporkful.com.

    • 40 min
    Writer Kiese Laymon Wants To Be Heavy

    Writer Kiese Laymon Wants To Be Heavy

    On the weight of being Black in America... Kiese Laymon has spent his whole life in conflict over eating and not eating. Over the course of his life, his weight has spiked and dipped. In his book, Heavy: An American Memoir, Kiese weaves together all these experiences. In doing so, disordered eating, anti-blackness, fat-phobia, and addiction all bubble together. "As artists, we got to be able to talk about all of it at once because it always happens at once," he says. "Food to me is a paradoxical way to get into all of the mess of what we are."

    Get 500+ more great Sporkful episodes from our catalog and lots of other Stitcher goodness when you sign up for Stitcher Premium: www.StitcherPremium.com/Sporkful (promo code: SPORKFUL).

    Transcript available at www.sporkful.com.

    • 31 min
    How To Taste Food Like A Flavor Chemist

    How To Taste Food Like A Flavor Chemist

    And why natural flavors are shrouded in secrecy...“Natural flavors” show up on ingredient lists for all kinds of foods. But what does that mean exactly? We get a peek into the secretive science of flavoring when we talk with Marie Wright of ADM Nutrition, who’s created more than 1,000 flavors in her 30 years as a flavor chemist. She explains how natural flavors are made, why lemon flavor doesn’t contain lemon juice, and why flavoring plant-based burgers is so hard. Then she walks Dan through a series of experiments to teach him to taste food the way she does. (You can do your own versions with instructions at Sporkful.com.) Plus, Marie responds to criticism about the rise of natural and artificial flavors in processed foods, and their role in the obesity epidemic.

    Get 500+ more great Sporkful episodes from our catalog and lots of other Stitcher goodness when you sign up for Stitcher Premium: www.StitcherPremium.com/Sporkful (promo code: SPORKFUL).

    Transcript available at www.sporkful.com.

    • 33 min
    A Reckoning At Bon Appetit

    A Reckoning At Bon Appetit

    A beloved brand with a toxic workplace... The videos shot in the Bon Appetit Test Kitchen are among the most popular food videos on YouTube, beloved for their depiction of a workplace that feels cool, fun, and diverse, full of chummy editors who have become celebrities. But that all changed this week when a photo of Bon Appetit editor-in-chief Adam Rapoport in brownface was posted to Twitter. It brought to the fore long-simmering anger about a lack of diversity among the staff and the cuisines that get highlighted, as well as pay inequities and hostile treatment for people of color at BA. We speak with reporter Rachel Premack, former staffer Nikita Richardson, and current BA assistant editor Sohla El-Waylly to find out what it’s like to work at Bon Appetit, and what it will take to change it.

    Get 500+ more great Sporkful episodes from our catalog and lots of other Stitcher goodness when you sign up for Stitcher Premium: www.StitcherPremium.com/Sporkful (promo code: SPORKFUL).

    Transcript available at www.sporkful.com.

    • 34 min
    When White People Say Plantation

    When White People Say Plantation

    The word "plantation" pops up a lot in the food world – Plantation Mint Tea, Plantation Chicken, Plantation Rum. But it's not a culinary term. It doesn't indicate certain spices or cooking methods. So what are white people in food who use this word trying to evoke? Inspired by a piece by food writer Osayi Endolyn, we go on a mission to find out. In the process, we try to learn something about whiteness in America. 

    Transcript available at www.sporkful.com.

    This episode is from The Sporkful's archives. Normally, this episode and hundreds like it are only available with Stitcher Premium. But in these difficult times, we're releasing it for free — both to help our listeners through quarantine, and to say thanks for continuing to support our show. If you'd like to have access to our entire archive, you can sign up for Stitcher Premium at www.stitcherpremium.com/SPORKFUL, and use the promo code SPORKFUL for a special discount.

    • 42 min
    Can A Restaurant Be For Everyone?

    Can A Restaurant Be For Everyone?

    "White people are comfortable anywhere," says restaurateur Andy Shallal. "In order for a black person to walk into a space, there need to be signals that say, 'You're welcome.'" In this week's show we decode those signals, which include the decor and music, the staff and other customers, and more. These codes tell you what kind of place a restaurant is, and whether it's for you. So what happens when a restaurant uses these signals to bring certain people in, and keep others out? This week we visit three very different restaurants in Washington D.C. to talk with the owners and customers about the different signals these places send, and what those codes can tell us about larger questions of race and culture. This episode is co-hosted by writer and reporter Kat Chow, formerly of the NPR podcast and blog Code Switch.

    Note: This episode first aired four years ago. We know that many of us can’t go to restaurants right now, but we think the questions it raises are bigger than restaurants, and remain very relevant today.

    Get 500+ more great Sporkful episodes from our catalog and lots of other Stitcher goodness when you sign up for Stitcher Premium: www.StitcherPremium.com/Sporkful (promo code: SPORKFUL).

    Transcript available at www.sporkful.com.

    • 42 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
2.6K Ratings

2.6K Ratings

TMT-DC ,

Loved the plantation update!

Your co-host was perfect: well-informed, funny, poignant, appropriately disdainful, just all-around wonderful!!!

aley burd ,

Fantastic

I started listening to the Sporkful on a road trip and fell in love. Probably my favorite food related podcast I’ve found so far. “When White People Say Plantation” is also one of the best (but also most frustrating) podcast episodes I’ve listened to. So much more than cooking tips or the same old food-related conversations, this feels a lot more personal, sometimes uncomfortable, important, and genuinely enjoyable.

ghkjjgjhfc ,

The best

This the best food podcast ever!!!’

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